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Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Fa. 




JANUARY 14, 1920 




New Year Number 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students 9 Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop 9 * 



$1.00 a Week 

WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 

Watch and Diamond 
CLUB 

The P. H. Caplin Co. 

The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 

206 Market Street 

tiarrisburg, Pa. 



H. J, C0L0V1RAS C. S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS 9 
CARAMELS, ETC 

SWEETLAND 

Light Lunches, 
Ice Cream and Sodas 

LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
ICENT ICE CREAM PAR- 
LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

331 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE C& 



UCIBLE 



THE 

CRYSTAL 

Restaurant 

C. D. Papachristos 
John Boutselis 

OPPOSITE PENNSYLVANIA 
RAILROAD STATION 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sport 

Kodaks Toys 
Bicycles Guns 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 
205 MARKET STREET 

Harrisburg, Penna. 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Furnishings 

KIN PORTS 

Ann vi lie, Pa 

Students' Discount 

Packard and American Lady 
SHOES 
A.rrow Collars and Shirts 



SPALDING 

Athletic 
Equipment 
For 
Every 
Indoor 
And 
Outdoor 
Sport 

BASKET BALL, BOXING 
GYMNASIUM CLOTHING 
ICE SKATES AND SHOES 

Send for Catalogue 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
126 Nassau St. N. Y. 




CLOTHING 

FOR 

Well Dressed 
MEN 

McFall & Son 

Third & Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



114 

College 

Women 

Demand 

Heavy 

Brogue 

Oxfords 

For 

Winter 
See 
Ours 
First 



THE CRUCIBLE 

Young Men and Women 
Who Demand Smart Footwear 
Go to the 

WALK-OVER 

226 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



College 
Men 
Demand 
Brogues 
This 
Season 
See 
Ours 
In 

Mahogany 
Cordovan 



Lower Prices 

For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can Now Buy That Hart, Schaffner & Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit or Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

For Reliable Clothing See 

L^q i i Bros. 
Tailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 




What Is Vacuum ? 



IF THE traffic policeman did not hold up his hand and control the 
automobiles and wagons and people there would be collisions, 
confusion, and but little progress in any direction. His business 
is to direct. 

The physicist who tries to obtain a vacuum that is nearly perfect 
has a problem somewhat like that of the traffic policeman. Air is 
composed of molecules — billions and billions of them flying about 
in all directions and often colliding. The physicist's pump is designed 
to make the molecules travel in one direction — out through the 
exhaust. The molecules are much too small to be seen even with a 
microscope, but the pump jogs them along and at least starts them in 
the right direction. 

A perfect vacuum would be one in which there is not a single free 
molecule. 

For over forty years scientists have been trying to pump and jog 
and herd more molecules out of vessels. There are still in the best 
vacuum obtainable more molecules per cubic centimeter than there 
are people in the world, in other words, about two billion. Whenever 
a new jogging device is invented, it becomes possible to eject a few 
million more molecules. 

The Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company have 
spent years in trying to drive more and more molecules of air from 
containers. The chief purpose has been to study the effects obtained, 
as, for example, the boiling away of metals in a vacuum. 

This investigation of high vacua had unexpected results. It be- 
came possible to make better X-ray tubes — better because the 
X-rays could be controlled; to make the electron tubes now so essen- 
tial in long-range wireless communication more efficient and trust- 
worthy; and to develop an entirely new type of incandescent lamp, 
one which is filled with a gas and which gives more light than any of 
the older lamps. 

No one can foretell what will be the outcome of research in pure 
science. New knowledge, new ideas inevitably are gained. And 
sooner or later this new knowledge, these new ideas find a practical 
application. For this reason the primary purpose of the Research 
Laboratories of the General Electric Company is the broadening of 
human knowledge. 




General Office 




Schenectady, N. Y. 



116 



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Lebanon Hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 
211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Hat Cleaning, Rebloching 

LADIES' and GENTLEMEN'S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 



GRAN/TINE 
WALL PLASTER 
COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitine Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders' Supplies 

Tiuscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



C. G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 

43 No. 9th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE CHARM OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



STATIONERY e. j. SNAVELY& co 

PICTURES FRAMES SpOTt'lUg GOOdS 
KODAKS FINISHING Athletic Equipment 

Leather GOOdS Umbrellas, Trunks 

Lamps and Shades ^IStt 

HARPEL'S MARKET SQUARE 

V LEBANON, PA. 

t* fHF GIFT STORE OF LEBANON" I * 



THl 



CRUCIBLE 



Vol ume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, January 14, 1920 No. 6 



Editor-in-Chief 

ORIN J. FARRELL, '21 

Associates 

OLIVE E. DARLING, '21 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21 
AMMON HAAS, '21 
MIRIAM CASSEL, '22 



Literary 

RHODES R. STABLEY, '22 
MAE REEVES, '23 
MA RYAN P. MATUSZAK 

Activities 
GEORGE O. HOHL, '23 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22 

Alumni 

LUCILE SHENK, '23 



Athletics 

GUY W. MOORE, '21 
HAROLD LUTZ, '23 

Music 

EMMA WITMEYER, '21 
BEULAH SWARTZBAUGH, '21 

Jokes and Exchanges 

HEBER MUTCH, '23 



Business Manager 

CARROLL R. DAUGHERTY, '21 

Assistants 

P. RODNEY KREIDER, '22 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23 
GASTON VANDEN BOSCHE, '2 2 
RALPH E. MARTIN 

Copyist 

ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23 



Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1910, at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single cop- 
ies, 15c each. 



Address all communications to Carroll R. 
Daugherty, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's 
hands before the second and fourth Friday of 
each month. 



EDITORIAL 

X 1921 — A Year of Readjustment 

Another year has passed into the irrevocable 
past. It was a year full of grave situations. 
Many conflicts waged upon this little earth. Dur- 
ing the twelve months that have just ended there 
were evolved problems galore with which coun- 
tries, statesmen, and everyone in general will have 



to be concerned during the year that has just 
begun. 

There is preeminently the question of feeding 
and clothing destitute Europe. This good work 
must be done ; else will it be to the shame of us 
who sit in comparative ease and plenty. In this 
work of relief everyone should have a part. See 
that 1921 frowns not upon you for turning a deaf 
ear to this urgent call, 



118 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Closer home comes the question of raising rev- 
enue for liquidating our war debt. This is a 
serious problem and needs to be thought out 
thoroly and applied wisely. Familiarize your- 
self with the issues of this project. Ours is a 
government of the people. The opinion of the 
people is bound ultimately to prevail. Help 
formulate a wise and proper opinion concerning 
this weighty matter so that our legislators may 
arrive at the best way of clearing off our great 
war debt. 

Just now the industrial situation seems to be 
reaching a climax. A return to something like 
pre-war conditions is inevitable. This means low- 
ering of prices and wages. Perhaps it means 
times of depression and unemployment. These 
things must be expected. But we believe that 
they are now at the worst, and that soon tran- 
quility will be restored. The Federal banking 
system has done wonderful work in stemming the 
lowering tide so that the fall might be brought 
about gradually. And so we firmly believe that 
after this temporary depression we will again be 
on level ground and will be sailing along smooth- 

ly. 

These few of the more important features of 
the day have been cited to show that 1921 has an 
outlook for a prominent place in the world's his- 
tory. We feel that some day in the far-distant 
future historians will speak of this year as the 
"year of readjustment." We are confident that 
these mighty problems will be solved, and that 
the end of this year will find the world in a state 
of peace and prosperity. And each one of ua 
may help bring this about by readjusting our- 
selves to our new and changed circumstances. 
Fall in line with the work of the "year of read- 
justment." 

FIT'S HONEST VERDICT 
III. My Room in College 

A room in college is a wonderful thing. Ev- 
erybody that knows says so. Back home I had 
things first rate. When I stayed with my brother 
we 'ud go to bed at half past eight or 9 an' talk, 
an' talk, an' talk. Here in College my room- 
mate an' I talk, an' talk, an' talk an' then go to 
bed. Then he talks in his sleep. I heard him 
ask one night who was on the table an' I saw 
plain as daylight they warn't no one on it, so I had 
a good laff all to myself. He got out on the porch 
rooft one night, at a place where he was sleeping, 
an' never woke till next day, but that don't tell 
anything about our room. We have a grass rug 
on the floor an' some bought pictures on the wall. 
You know I think a light that you can't blow out 



is a funny thing, but it's handy though, after you 
learn to use it. That's the kind we have. 

We have tables to study on and rocking chairs 
to sit on. My roommate owns the chairs an' the 
rug. The school furnishes the tables. I own the 
pictures. You know I could of got just as nice 
a ones out of the papers but my roommate bought 
these unbeknowance to me, at the 10c store an' 
then said I oughter pay for sumthin'. Well of 
course that's only fair, so I paid fer them, but I 
think it 'ud a paid better to a paid it on my books 
or* meals an' then I'd a had sumthin in return. My 
roommate says if I furnish the money he'll furn- 
ish the taste. He'd have a regular parlor out a' 
what he calls our den if I'd buy it. He says 
while our room is a lookin' so well that I oughter 
buy a flowered waist basket at the 10c store. He 
says the shoe box we use is an eye sore. Don't 
see why he has to look at it if he don't want to, 
do you? 

We git along very well. He is quite a help to 
me. He says he's sorry he can't say the same 
fer me, but he doesn't act it. 

We have iron beds. They are not as big as 
ma's wooden stids but they are well sprung. We 
have white counterpains on top. We had them 
at home when company came, but we seem to be 
company all the time here. Every day seems to 
be Sunday judgin' from the way some dress, an' 
all the year seems like a summer time. 

We have curtains on our windows. My room 
mate brought them from his home. He thinks it 
makes the room cozier. I think you can't see 
through the window as well. He has funny no- 
tions, don't you think? But they say all room- 
mates are funny. Guess they just want to be 
different. 

Next time I'll tell you about the whole dormi- 
tory (the house where all the boys stay). 

DAVID FIT. 

THAT'S LUCK! 

When you've fought a fight with courage bold 

And you've won the laurels, too; 
When you've toiled with never ending will 

And you've brought the victry thru ; 
When you've giv'n your best to meet the test • 

And you've climbed to heights of blue — 
That's luck! 

i 

When you've struggled hard against the odds 
And you've reached the place of few; 

When you've pulled when pulling seemed in vain 
And you've got Success in view; 

When you've worked with pep while others slept 
And you've reached your goal, your due — 
That's luck! 



THE CRUCIBLE 



119 



When you've tried again though oft you've failed 

And you've made a winning, too ; 
When you've smiled at loss and grinned at fate 

And said to Want — "Adieu"; 
When you've driv'n to doom the clouds of gloom 

And you've let the Sunshine thru — 
That's luck! 

—RHODES R. STABLEY. 
STRIKES 

Ever since the war a general conflict between 
American employer and the union has been im- 
minent. At first it was somewhat masked, but 
now the contest is open and becoming more and 
more serious. During the war the unions were 
quietly, but surely booming stronger. 

One would think that since the war is over 
everybody would be willing to settle down and 
do their work in order to bring about the old order 
of things, instead we hear nothing but strikes and 
labor disputes. The war doubtless helped to pro- 
mote this condition, but the fundamental reason 
is the fact that the work of the modern trades- 
man and laborer is so specialized, so devoid of 
intrinsic interest that the workman finds no in- 
centive to work except the pay he receives. Most 
people hate work. They work because they must 
earn a living. It is little wonder that they hate 
it. They go through the same movements day 
after day, week after week, year in and year out. 
But if a man is interested in a certain kind of 
work and he gets joy out of doing it, he will not 
strike. Why will some men give up good jobs 
and high salaries for some other jobs which will 
pay only half as much? Is money really the most 
important factor? No, money is not as strong 
an incentive as it is usually thought to be. When 
money is all a man gets for his work, of course, 
he will take any means possible to get all he can. 
When he works because of other motives he will 
become less conscious of the amount of pay he 
receives. The work must be made more interest- 
ing for the working class. Did you ever wonder 
why ministers do not strike? A New York 
clergyman said, "The reason ministers do not 
strike is because they are not in the work for the 
money but because of their interest and love for 
the work." This is not only true of ministers, 
but it is true of a large number of men who have 
chosen a certain line of work because they are 
interested in it and find pleasure in doing it. 

Making the work interesting would be a big 
help in solving the labor problem. The old 
theory of education used to be that the duller, 
and uninteresting subjects were better for stu- 
dents than the interesting ones because of the dis- 



ciplinary value of making the student do what he 
disliked. But the modern and better way is to 
present the dead subjects in an interesting way. 
Psychology has shown that the way to do a thing 
quickly and well is to become intensely inter- 
ested in it. Enough variation should be left in 
a man's job to kill the monotony. He must also 
see that he is a vital part of the organization. 
No man will show interest unless there is a possi- 
bility of promotion. This was shown very clearly 
in the army. Before the armistice was signed 
men worked hard and with much interest because 
thev saw a chance for a commission. But as soon 
as the armistice was signed they lost all interest 
because they realized that no promotions were 
possible. 

The present industrial unrest will not cease 
until the workman is studied as a human organism 
with the purpose in mind of giving him some in- 
terest in his work beside the pay he receives. 

THE CHRISTMAS BANQUET 

North Hall, gorgeously decked in holiday garb 
of laurel, rhododedron and ground pine, with gay 
lights and lavish touches of the Christmas colors, 
awaited on December 15 the guests of the Christ- 
mas banquet. 

About six o'clock they began to pour in, filling 
the parlor and hall. While the final preparations 
were being completed behind the closed doors of 
the dining hall, the eager crowd amused itself with 
animated conversation and a good deal of fun 
about the counterfeit mistletoe which hung above 
the" doorway of the parlor. Finally, the sweet 
familiar music of the dinner bell was heard and 
Dr. and Mrs. G. D. Gossard led the procession to 
the dining hall. 

What a pleasing spectacle greeted the eyes up- 
on entering — the old dining hall transformed into 
a festive banquet hall, illumined by the light of 
many candles. Waiters ushered each guest to his 
or her place which was indicated by artistic hand- 
painted place cards. And then what a dinner! 
No wonder that it took two hours and half to 
devour it. At last, however, it was accomplished 
and the toastmaster, Dr. Gossard, rose to intro- 
duce the speakers. This was done so thoroughly 
that the students were delighted to learn several 
unique incidents in the history of the lives of our 
professors. The toast that followed furnished a 
savory course of smiles garnished w 7 ith laughs. 
Professor Shenk discoursed in a learned manner 
about "???". Professor Beatty deliberately and 
shamelessly set out to violate all accepted rules 
of oratory trying to describe the characteristics 
of "Osmanli," a formidably strange subject which 



120 



THE CRUCIBLE 



turned out to mean nothing but turkey. Then 
Professor Derrickson expounded upon the very 
comprehensive subject of "Zero". Edith Stager 
paid a tribute to "1921" while Rhodes Stabley ex- 
pressed his sentiment in "Ishkebibble". Harold 
Lutz dealt with the mysteries of "Farce aux Hui- 
tres". Finally, kind greetings of the season were 
extended to all by Cynthia Drummond. 

After this the company retired to the parlor 
where a brilliant Christmas tree stood. Everyone 
was quite surprised to witness a wedding cere- 
mony in which Mr. Short and Miss Tall were unit- 
ed in the bands of matrimony. Soon after this in- 
cident, sleigh bells were heard and suddenly, 
Santa Claus himself bobbed in through the win- 
dow, there being no chimney to furnish the cus- 
tomary ingress. The old gentleman had two big 
packs of presents for the good little boys and 
girls of L. V. 

The distribution of the many gifts lasted a long 
while and squeals of surprise and shouts of hilar- 
ity rang through the dorm. At last, it was all 
over and the guests departed in high spirits, 
laden with various toys. 

DAY STUDENTS PARTY 

In answer to personal and written invitations, 
forty day students from Lebanon, Annville, Pal- 
myra, Hershey and the environs gathered at the 
Moose Hall for a lively Christmas party. The fun 
of the evening was started by "Going to Ann- 
ville," a game renamed to suit the occasion and 
from this start a series of merry games followed 
one another in close succession. Music was furn- 
ished by Rachel Parry, of Lebanon, who joined in 
the spirit of the evening with as much pep as any- 
one. • 

After refreshments were served, our modern 
Santa Claus, in the person of Bobby Hynson, ap- 
peared with his pack. He had gifts for everyone 
and presented them with merry remarks and sal- 
lies of wit which threw the whole company into 
uproarious laughter. 

At eleven thirty the Annville students left and 
the Lebanon students grouped about the piano 
to sing Christmas songs. They sang until the 
town clock struck twelve, a warning which caused 
the students to scatter regretfully to their various 
homes. 

SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY HOLDS MEETING 

Thursday evening, December 16, 1920 the 
Scientific Society met in the Biology recitation 
room and presentated a program. 

Miss Mabel Miller gave an illustrated talk on 



Deer. Miss Miller was very familiar with her 
subject. She told about the mating of these an- 
imals, how the young are cared for, how very soon 
they "grow up" and are able to run with amaz- 
ing swiftness, how the horns grow and branch, 
in short all about the Deer. She added greatly 
to her talk by presenting pictures thrown on the 
screen by the projection machine. 

Mr. Harold Bender read a paper on Gas. He 
was full of his subject. Mr. Bender traced the 
history of the gas lamp from its crudest earliest 
forms to the present efficient glowing Welsbach 
burner. He explained why gas has not entirely 
been replaced by electricity and why it will hold 
its own for many years yet. 

Two new members were received in the busi- 
ness session: Messrs. Farrell and Martin. Sev- 
eral new members have been taken in this year. 
The interest is growing. The Society is fast be- 
coming one of the principal student organiza- 
tions. Your presence is solicitated for the next 
meeting. Come once and you will come always. 

THE FRESHMAN BANQUET 

The annual banquet of the Freshman class was 
held at the Penn-Harris in Harrisburg on Monday 
evening, January 3, 1921. The banquet hall was 
prettily decorated with the colors of the Fresh- 
man class and with college pennants. 

The following menu was served : Cherrystone 
Oyster Cocktail, Celery, Queen Olives, Cream of 
Corn, Stuffed Roast Turkey, Cranberry Sauce, 
Brussels Sprouts, Candied Yams, Endive Salad 
Chiffonaide, Strawberry Ice Cream, Assorted 
Cakes, Demi Tasse, After Dinner Mints. 

After this delightful banquet, toasts were given 
with Professor T. B. Beatty as toastmaster. The 
toasts were as follows : General Review, Wm. E. 
Wolfe. President; Our Girls, Carl Bachman ; Our 
Boys, Mildred Kreider; Vocal Selection, Dorothy 
Sholly; Reading. Rachel Heindel ; Assorted Nuts, 
Mary Yinger; Piano and Vocal Selections, Ruth 
Harpel; French Play, Ruth Oyer; Football, Rus- 
sell Behman; Our Past, A. Miller; Class Poem, 
Cynthia Drummond; Basketball, Richard Stauff- 
er; Entomology, Rolfe Baltzell ; Reading, Esther 
Singer. 

A tired but happy bunch returned to school and 
as the last girl stole up the stairs at North Hall, 
another Freshman banquet had become history. 

DR. HERSHEY GIVES CONCERT 

The students of Lebanon Valley College and 
their Annville patrons were given an unusual 
treat on Tuesday evening, December 14, in Engle 



THE CRUCIBLE 



121 



Hall. Professor Urban H. Hershey, the new di- 
rector of the Conservatory, showed his remark- 
able skill as a performer on the organ. He was 
ably assisted by Miss Hilda Lichtenberger, so- 
prano soloist, and Miss Elizabeth Schlegelmilch, 
harpist. 

Dr. Hershey played three groups of excellent 
numbers. "Concert Piece" by Volckman, "Gar- 
otle" by Suk and "Caprice" by Yehsreh were 
among the best liked renditions. He was also a 
very excellent accompanist. 

Miss Lichtenberger sang beautifully two groups 
of songs. "Oh, Would I Were The Cool Wind" 
by Hershey was well-rendered. In "Spring" by 
Stern, she displayed her splendid lyric work. 

A harpist was quite a novelty for Lebanon Val- 
ley College. Rarely are we privileged to hear an 
artist on the harp but in Miss Schlegelmilch we 
were well-pleased. She is a member of the Sal- 
zedo Ensemble. She played two groups and an 
encore, accompanied on the organ by Dr. Hershey. 

We are hoping that we will have the privilege 
of hearing more of Dr. Hershey's playing as well 
as other artists. 

MATH ROUND TABLE MEETS 

The lovers of the exact science gathered around 
the table Wednesday evening, January 5th, 
where they held a discussion on two subjects: 
Mathematics of the Bible, and Geometry. 

The discussion on the first topic was led by Miss 
Mabel Miller. She did thoro research work ; and 
as a result the blackboard was crowded with il- 
lustrations which proved the preponderance of 
Mathematics in the Holy Writ. She showed how 
that all the numbers up to ten have each a pe- 
culiar significance. The number seven (7) seems 
to be the most important number in the history 
of mankind. Eleven (11) was shown to predom- 
inate the field of music. This exposition by Miss 
Miller was an eye-opener to all who heard it. 

Mr. Gaston VandenBosch followed with a pa- 
per on the History of Geometry. He traced the 
beginnings of this branch of Mathematics back 
to the earliest times and showed how it has been 
developed to its present form. The content of 
his paper should be known to every student of 
Mathematics. 

Mr. Heber Mutch presented a sketch of the life 
of Euclid. His biography of this eminent scien- 
tist of long ago was indeed interesting and prof- 
itable. It is well to know the character and his- 
tory of those who have laid the foundations for 
the Queen of Science. 

A few of the most interesting of Geometrical 



theorems and their various proofs were explained 
by Mr. Marion Matuszak. He had his proofs 
well in hand and was able to present them in a 
most interesting manner. The various ways in 
which these theorems can be proven indicates 
that there are still other ways yet to be found. 
This thought adds a zest to the study of numbers 
and figures and opens the way for original work. 
We should be more than glad to hear one of 
these days that some member of the Round Table 
had devised a new method of proof or demonstra- 
tion of some theorem. 

In the business session that followed three new 
members were admitted to sit at the Round Table. 
These were Misses Brunner and Balsbaugh and 
Mr. Williard. New members are being received 
at every meeting. Come to the next session. We 
promise you it will be well worth attending. 

BASKETBALL 

The Blue and White basketball season is on. 
Coach "Hobey" Light has picked the five men who 
will represent Lebanon Valley College and the 
team left on January 6 for its first three games 
with college quintets, Blue Ridge at New Wind- 
sor, Md., on Jan. 6; Washington at Chestertown, 
Md., on Jan. 7, and Gallaudet at Washington, D. 
C, on Jan. 8. Fifteen other games besides these 
are on the schedule, eight of which are to be 
played away from home, five at Lebanon and two 
in the college gymnasium at Annville. 

Two games, scheduled principally for the pur- 
pose of testing the mettle and ability of the Blue 
and White cage representatives, have already 
been played in the college gymnasium, Captain 
"Giggs" Moore's men winning one and losing one. 
The first opponents were the Annville Big Five, 
a team of the best local players. They were easy 
victims for the Blue and White five, which tri- 
umphed to the tune of 56 to 25. Captain Moore, 
with ten field goals, most of them of the one- 
handed southpaw type, was the individual star 
of the fray, but the playing of the entire team 
was snappy and fast and pleasing to Coach Light. 



The lineup for this game was: 



Annville 




Lebanon Valley 


Rohland 


Forward 


Wolfe 


Wagner 


Forward 


Stauffer 


Light 


Center 


Glick 






(Stabley) 


Keller 


Guard 


Moore 


(Barry) 






Grimm 


Guard 


Wolf 



(Homan) 

Field goals — Wagner 6, Rohland 3, Moore 10, 
Stauffer 6, Wolf 4, Glick 3, Wolfe 2, Keller, Stab- 



122 



THE CRUCIBLE 



ley. Foul goals — Rohland, 5 out of 12; Moore, 
4 out of 10. Referee — Hollinger. Timekeeper 
— Renn. 

Unlike the first, the second game was one of 
the most closely contested seen on the college floor 
in several seasons. On the opposing team, the 
Lebanon All Collegians, were two former Leba- 
non Valley stars in the persons of Paul L. Strick- 
ler and Joe Hollinger. The former was able to 
play only a few minutes, however, as an injury 
to his jaw early in the game caused his removal. 
Hollinger, on the other hand, played the entire 
game and did some spectacular shooting for his 
team. The game was nip and tuck throughout, 
neither quintet having a safe lead at any time dur- 
ing the game. The Blue and White five, how- 
ever, trailed in the rear until late in the game 
when they forged ahead. Later the score was tied 
but a foul goal by Hollinger and a field goal bv 
Hynson, former Princeton star, gave the All Col- 
legians a three-point lead at the close of the 
game, the final score being 32 to 29. 

The lineup was: 



Lebanon Valley 

Stauffer 

Wolfe 

Wolf 

Moore 

Homan 



Lebanon All Collegians 

Hynson Forward 
Strickler Forward 
Hollinger Center 
Havard Guard 
Binder Guard 

Substitution — Harpel for Havard for Strickler. 
Field goals — Hollinger 4, Wolf 4, Hynson 3, Hav- 
ard 3, Wolfe 3, Binder 2, Stauffer, Moore. Foul 
goals — Hollinger, 8 out of 17; Moore, 11 out of 
17. Referee — Bell. Timekeeper — Fake. 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

With the aim of helping each other by co-opera- 
tion and maintaining friendly business conditions 
and proper prices, Lebanon Valley students en- 
gaged in various business pursuits at the insti- 
tution, have formed an organization to be known 
as the Students' Board of Trade. At the initial 
meeting on January 4 R. Rhodes Stabley '22 was 
chosen president and Harold T. Lutz '23 secre- 
tary-treasurer. A committee has been appointed 
to draft a constitution and the board will hold 
regular monthly meetings. 

Included in the membership of the Board of 
Trade at present are : R. Rhodes Stabley and J. 
Russell Bowan of the 1922 Quittapahilla staff ; 
Nitrauer and Bachman, tailors; Lutz Brothers, 
typists and reporters; Vandenbosche, barber; 
Vandenbosche & Lutz, dealers in second-hand 
books; Williard, printer; C. C. Smith, photograph- 
er; Farrell, photographer; Gribble, barber; Shad- 
er, barber. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Graduates and friends of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege will be interested to learn of the marriage of 
Miss Edith Marie Lehman, daughter of Professor 
and Mrs. J. E. Lehman, of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, to Professor Ralph Lincoln Bartlett, a mem- 
ber of the faculty of Lehigh University, Bethle- 
hem, on December 27, 1920, at high noon with 
the Rev. Dr. I. E. Runk, of the Annville United 
Brethren Church, officiating. The bride is a 
graduate of Lebanon Valley College, Class of 

1913, and has been prominent in college circles 
during practically her whole life. She was in- 
structor in German at her Alma Mater and was 
recently granted the degree of Master of Arts 
by the University of Pennsylvania. She also 
taught in various high schools throughout the 
state since her graduation from college. Profes- 
sor Bartlett is a well-known and popular instruc- 
tor in the Department of Mining Engineering at 
Lehigh University. 

Professor Henry E. Snavely, Superintendent of 
the Public Schools of New Castle, Delaware, a 
graduate of Lebanon Valley College, Class of 

1914, had the honor of addressing the Browning 
Society of Philadelphia only recently on the sub- 
ject, "Classes And Masses In England After Wat- 
erloo." 

Victor Heffelfinger '13 is principal of the high 
school at Dubois, Pennsylvania. 

On the evening of the first day of the New 
Year at 379 North Ninth Street, Lebanon, Dr. and 
Mrs. H. E. Maulfair announced the engagement of 
their daughter, Miss R. Helena Maulfair, '20, to 
Mr. Norman Bouder, '19. The home was beauti- 
fully decorated in the colors of the Clionian Lit- 
erary Society of which the bride-to-be was an in- 
terested and active member while in college. The 
guests present were college chums of Miss Maul- 
fair, who at the present time is instructor in Eng- 
lish and Public Speaking in the high school at 
Dover, Delaware. Mr. Bouder is a son of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. S. Bouder, also of Lebanon, and at the 
present time is in the employ of the government 
as a research chemist at Edgewood Arsenal, Edge- 
wood, Maryland. 

Another engagement of great interest to stu- 
dents of Lebanon Valley College is that of Mr. 
Paul L. Strickler, '14, a member of the Lebanon 
High School facultv, and Miss Lucetta Eckert, of 
212 South Eighth Street, Lebanon, which was 
announced by the latter's mother, Mrs. Matilda 
Eckert, on December 27 of last year. The bride- 
to-be is a graduate of Lebanon High School, Class 
of 1913, and the prospective groom was Athletic 
Coach of Lebanon Valley College in the winter 



THE CRUCIBLE 



123 



of 1919-1920 and at present is a member of the 
Lebanon High School faculty and also athletic 
coach. The wedding will probably take place 
sometime in June. 

The first day of the New Year brought death to 
one of Lebanon Valley College's staunch friends 
in the person of William O. Appenzellar of Cham- 
bersburg, Pa. For a number of years Mr. Appen- 
zellar had served the college as a member of the 
board of trustees, his term not expiring until 1922, 
and he was at all times a loyal supporter of the 
institution and its efforts towards advancement. 
Two of his sons, Prof. J. Lester Appenzellar, prin- 
cipal of the Lebanon High School, and W. Ralph 
Appenzellar, trust officer of the Chambersburg 
Trust Company, are graduates of Lebanon Valley. 

THE CHAP WHO WON 

It wasn't because his dad was rich that he made 

success in life, 
It wasn't because he'd been to school that he won 

in bitter strife, 
It wasn't because he had the luck that he got the 

golden prize, 
But he fought with zeal and he dared to do with 

a spirit that never dies ! 
It wasn't because he had the "pull" that he 

reached the skies of blue, 
It wasn't because he had the "brains" that he 

made a fortune too, 
It wasn't because it never rained that with hap- 

iness he's blest, 
But he worked with pep, while others slept and 

he gave the world his best. 

R. Rhodes Stabley. 

DINNER TABLE REPARTEE 

Baltzell — "What I don't know isn't worth 
knowing." 

Female Voice — "How about Mathmetics?" 
Baltzell — "I'm not mathematically inclined." 
Second Voice — "How about Chemistry?" 
Baltzell — "I'm not chemically inclined." 
Third Voice— "How about Physics?" 
Baltzell — "Well, I am physically inclined." 
Lutz — "And above all, you're mentally de- 
clined." 

JOKES 

"Where did you get that cigar?" 
"Somebody gave it to me." 
"A friend?" 
"I don't know yet." 

— American Legion Weekly. 

Here's to our income — we can't live within it 
or without it. — Nashville Tennessean. 



Professor Beatty in English II — Anybody can 
have an auto for the taking. 
Is that how he got his? 

Fresh — I'm so despondent over my literary out- 
look. 

Soph — How so? 

Fresh^I sent my best essay "Why Do I Live" 
to the English instructor and he wrote back "Be- 
cause you didn't bring this in person." 

— Ursinus Weekly. 

The following were present at the New Year's 
Party and Dance given by Miss E. E. Miller in 
honor of her charge, Miss Carline Hiser, this sea- 
son's debutante : Misses Iona Still, Virginia Dair, 
Montayne Dew, I. Emma Bootleggah, Extray Dri- 
Jinn, Clarette Champain. Rose Sherry, Toxie Rat- 
ed, and Gingie Ginger-Ayle ; Messrs. Al Cohol, 
B. Friskat Whiscay, U. R. Full, Branday B. Hork- 
ivino, B. A. DeStiller, Hadsum Ginrickay, J. Bar- 
leigh Korn, I. M. Coynyack, U. R. Hoam-Brew, 
Seymore Roote Beer, C. U. Spidor. 

All had a lively time and felt the spirit of the 
season — Society Note by William Wenner. 

"Freddy is thinking seriously about marriage." 
"Oh! How long has he been married?" 

? — "What is the shape of a kiss?" 

! — "Give me one, and we'll call it square." 

— Philomath College Chimes. 

An absolutely "fire-proof" building has been 
erected in New York. Inquiry develops the fact 
that it has been insured. — Boston Transcript. 

Presents make the heart grow fonder. — Colum- 
bian Record. 

New York police are ordered to arrest all out- 
of-town criminals. They propose to protect home 
industries. — Pittsburgh Gazette Times. 

Political Science Student — Well, President 
Harding is cautious enough. 

Professor Gingrich — How so? 

Political Science Student — He wears both belt 
and suspenders. 

"You're no judge of beauty." 
""No?" 

"No, this is not the most beautiful baby in the 
show." 

"My eye for beauty is all right. Have you 
seen its mother?" 
"No." 

"Take a look at her." — Courier Journal. 

"Of course, there is no such thing as woman's 
supremacy." 

"Think not? From the time a boy sits under 
the street-light playing with a toad until he's old 



124 



THE CRUCIBLE 



and blind and toothless, he has to explain to some 
woman why he didn't come home earlier." 

— Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

Young Husband — Well, Ethel, I've just suc- 
ceeded in borrowing a thousand pounds from your 
uncle to start in business. 

Ethel — Oh, Jack, I always knew you'd make 
good. — Passing Show. 

The motto of King Constantine seems to be out 
of the frying pan into Greece— Colliers. 

The latest efforts of scientists to manufacture 
genuine diamonds have met with failure, but ev- 
erybody has seen a simple little maiden make a 
fine diamond grow out of a spoon. — Lowell Cour- 
ier-Citizen. 

A court has decided that the man is the head 
of the family, but the man still has to prove it — 
Minneapolis Tribune. 

Everything, good authority tells us, is lower in 
price. Even the $5.00 silk shirts are down to 
$8.50, reduced from $13.50 — New York Tribune. 

Prof. — What is there to substantiate the opin- 
ion that Shakespeare was a prophet? 

Soph — He was fortelling the era of home brew 
when he wrote the recipe for Witches Broth in 
Macbeth — Pitt Panther. ^ 

"I don't see why you haggled so with the tailor 
about the price. You'll never pay him." 

"Oh, but you see, I'm conscientious. I don't 
want him to lose more than is necessary." 

"While I appreciate the honor of your proposal 
of marriage, circumstances beyond my control 
compel me to decline." 

"What are those circumstances?" 

"Yours." 

1620 — Indians sold Manhattan Island for keg 
of whiskey. 

1920 — Citizens want to trade back. 

"Don't they allow us to raise children in this 
apartment house?" 
"No." 

"Nor kittens, nor puppies, nor parrots?" 
"No. Nothing is permitted to be raised here 
but the rent." 

Parent — What is your reason in wishing to mar- 
ry my daughter? 

Young Man — I have none, sir; I am in love. 

Our inquisitive biologists — Shader, Oberholtzer 
and D'Addario. 



The captain had ordered his men not to forage. 
That night he met a corporal with a sheep over 
his shoulder. 

"Forget what I said, Corporal?" 

"Not exactly; but no sheep can bite me and 
get away with it." 

First Constable — Did you get that fellow's num- 
ber? 

Second Constable — No, he was too fast for me. 
Peach of a girl on the back seat, wasn't it? 
First Constable — She sure was. 

"Hello, what are you doing?" 
"Just filling up some holes, man, where the rats 
get in." 

"But, man, that's where they get out." 

A travelling salesman, coming upon a boy seat- 
ed on a porch, inquired if his mother were home. 
Upon an affirmative answer, he went to the door 
and knocked. Nobody answered. 

"See here ; I thought you said your mother was 
home. Nobody answers." 

"That may be," replied the boy. "I don't live 
here." 

"Can I get off tomorrow?" 
"What for?" 

"I want to go to a wedding." 
"Must you go?" 

"Well, I'd like to, sir; I'm the bridegroom." 

: 

i Doctor Wenner — One patient I had was very 
ill. Nothing but a holiday in the south would 
have cured him. What he needed was plenty of 
sunshine. But he was too poor. 

Floss — And what did you do? 

Doc. — I had a large sun painted on his ceiling. 
Hypnotism, you see. It worked beautifully and 
he was soon well. Suddenly he died. 
"~ Floss — Then it really failed after all. 

Doc. — No. He died of sunstroke. 

Little John was crying. 
"""What is the matter?" asked his mother. 

"Father hit his finger with the hammer." 

"That's nothing to cry about. You should have 
laughed." 
, "I did." 

Youth — What do I pay for a marriage license? 
Clerk — You pay for it on the installment plan. 
Youth— How's that? 

Clerk — Two dollars down, and your salary ev- 
ery week the rest of your life. 

Lutz says: Daisy Ashford may be a young 
writer of the present age, but we must remember 
that the "Spanish Tragedy" was written by a Kyd. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



125 



Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Supplies 
Guitars Violius Baujos 

Ukeleles Sheet Music 
Music Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 

See the New Fall Styles 

ill 




The Shoeman 
•'The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 
see 

J* S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F*ei. 




Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and Sporting 
Goods? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E. M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



126 THE 



Annville 
National Bank 
Annville, Pa. 

Capital Stock, $100,000 

Surplus and 

Undivided Profits, - - : - $175,000 



A.slc to s&& our 

Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 

839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, FAc 

Teachers for Schools. Schools for Teachers. 

NATIONAL 
TEACHERS 
AGENCY 

Incorporated 
D. H. COOK, MANAGER 

326-27-28 Perry Building, 1530 Chestnut St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Positions always open 
I have promoted over 15,000 teachers. 
Why not YOU? (Signed) D. H. COOK 



CRUCIBLE 

Both Phones 

Ask for Simon P. FEGAN 

Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon P. FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 

"Say it with FLOWERS" 

The Flower Shop 

19 • 21 North Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front <£ Maple Sts Lebanon, Pa. 

Bell Phone 

All- American 

MOYER'S 

Restaurant 

Eighth <8 Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 




John H. Hull 

The Harley-Davidson Agent 
Forge & Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



The House* of Service and 
SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures* 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



127 



Newgard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 
Dealers 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



Harry Zimmerman, D. D.S. 



DENTAL PARLORS 



72 West Main St. 



Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them— We Rebuild and Reweld Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
Sec if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 

2nd Walnut Streets HARRISBURG, PA. 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

W. R. WALTZ 

BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 

Cakes, Tobacco 
Oysters and Fish in Season 
E. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



128 



THE CRUCIBLE 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

^ For Churches, Colleges, Residences, Theatres, 
Etc. Over three thousand in use. The high- 
est grade instruments. Every organ espec- 
ially designed and built for the place and pur- 
pose for which it is to be used and fully 
guaranteed. Every part made in our own 

factory under personal supervision. Booklets 
and specification on request. 

M. P. MOLLER 

HAGERSTOWN - - MARYLAND 

N. B. — Builder of three manual, electric organ in 
Lebanon Valley College. 

SATISFY YOURSELF 

— EAT — 
Burdan's Ice Cream 

at the 

IDEAL 
RESTAURANT 

The Student's Second Home 

I. H. ROEMIG, Prop. 

LADIES' ROOMS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. F. Apple Co, 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 
120 E. Chestnut Street Lancaster, Penna. 

Manufacturers of 

Class and Fraternity Pins 

Rings, Medals, Cups 
Footballs - Basketballs 

Makers or 

1922, L. V. C. CLASS JEWELRY 

High Grade Chocolates 

Maillard's of New York 
APOLLO and REYMER'S 
Fancy Gift Packages A Specialty 

In 1 /2» 1 , 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds 

Various High Grade Confections Always Fresh 
The Store with the Candy with the Snap 

SHOTT'S 

127 N. 9th ST. LEBANON, PA. 

Bel 27-J 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 

CLOTHING 



Remodeled Refurnished 
European Plan Rooms $1.50 

Hotel Walton 

Fred Ehrhorn, Proprietor 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Lebanon, Pa 

Harvey L. Seltzer 
One Price Clothier 

And 

Men's Furnishings 

The House of Good Values 
769 Cumberland Street, 

Lebanon I 13 a 




Do You Want 

Room Furnishings 
Household Goods 

H W Miller- 

ANNVILLE, PA 



W 7VY Rohland 

Fresh and Smoked Meats 
Poultry, Milk, Butter 

3 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Miss L. A. Krum 

Millinery 

And 

Exclusive Shop for Women 

119 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Fink's Bakery 

Best Baked Products 

Yon Pay for the Articles. 

Quality and Service Cost You 
Nothing ! 

Quality Service 

Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hostetter 

217 E. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



"The Live Store" "Always Reliable" 

The Store Everybody Is 
Talking About 

DOUTRICHS 

We Can Sell You 

Guaranteed Clothes 

That Will Give You Satisfaction 

or 

Refund Your Money 

$35 - $40 - $45 

This Is The Harrisburg Home 

of 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx; Kuppenheimer 

and 

Society Brand Clothes 

Harrisburg, Penna. 



JANUARY 28, 1921 



W? £ <Q ^ ■ ' 




Examination Number 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students' Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop 9 * 



$1. 00 a Week 



WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 



Watch and Diamond 



CLUB 
The P. H. Capiin Co. 



The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 



206 Market Street 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



H. J. COLOVIRAS C. 5. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS 9 
CARAMELS, ETC 

SWEETLAND 

Light Lunches, 
Ice Cream and Sodas 

LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
ICENT ICE CREAM PAR- 
LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

331 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 
The House of Service and 



129 



SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures* 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville 
National Bank 
Annville, Pa. 



Capital Stock, - 
Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, 



$100,000 



- $175,000 



Ask to &&& our 

Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 

839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PAo 



Teachers for Schools. 



Schools for Teachers. 



NATIONAL 
TEACHERS 
AGENCY 

Incorporated 
D. H. COOK, MANAGER 

326-27-28 Perry Building, 1530 Chestnut St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Positions always open 
I have promoted over 15,000 teachers. 
Why no* YOU? {Signed) D. H. COOK 



Both Phones 



Ask for Simon P. FEGAN 

Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon P. FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



Say it with FLOWERS' 



The Flower Shop 

19 • 21 North Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front & Maple Sts Lebanon, Pa. 

Bell Phone 

All- American 

M0YERS 

Restaurant 

Eighth £ Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 




John H. Hull 

The Harley-Davidson Agent 
Forge & Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



130 



THE CRUCIBLE 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

1$ For Churches, Colleges, Residences, Theatres, 
Etc. Over three thousand in use. The high- 
est grade instruments. Every organ espec- 
ially designed and built for the place and pur- 
pose for which it is to be used and fully 
guaranteed. Every part made in our own 

factory under personal supervision. Booklets 
and specification on request. 

M. P. MOLLER 

HAGERSTOWN - - MARYLAND 

N. B.— Builder of three manual, electric organ in 
Lebanon Valley College. 



SATISFY YOURSELF 

~ EAT — 
Burdan's Ice Cream 

at the 

IDEAL 
RESTAURANT 

The Student's Second Home 

I. H. ROEMIG, Prop. 

LADIES' ROOMS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. F. Apple Co, 



MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 



120 E. Chestnut Street 



Lancaster, Penna. 



Manufacturers of 



Class and Fraternity Pms 
Rings, Medals, Cups 



Footballs 



Basketballs 



Mak 



ers or 



1922, L. V. C. CLASS JEWELRY 



High Grade Chocolates 

Maillard's of New York 
APOLLO and REYMER'S 
Fancy Gift Packages A Specialty 

In !/2» 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds 

Various High Grade Confections Always Fresh 
The Store with the Candy with the Snap 

SHOTT'S 

127 N. 9th ST. LEBANON, PA. 

Bel 27-J 



THE C 

Lebanon hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 
211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Hat Cleaning, Reblocking 

LADIES' and GENTLEMEN'S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 

GR^mWnE 
WALL PLASTER 
COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitine Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders' Supplies 

Truscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENNA. 

ST A TI0NER Y 

PICTURES FRAMES 
KODAKS FINISHING 

Leather Goods 
Lamps and Shades 

HARPEUS 

' THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON" \ 



UCIBLE 131 

C G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 

43 No. 9th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE CHARM OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



E J. SNAVELY & CO 

Sporting Goods 

Athletic Equipment 
Umbrellas, Trunks 
Hand Luggage, and 
Travel lors* Requisites 
MARKET SQUARE 

LEBANON, PA. 



132 

In stock now, and 
Coming through 
Daily. Low shoes 
For young men and 
"Women, designed 
By this shop 
Particularly for 



THE CRUCIBLE 

Young Men and Women 
Who Demand Smart Footwear 
Go to the 

WALK -OVER 

226 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Our college 
Clientele. 
Imported Scotch 
Grain in heavy 
Stitched models. 
Your inspection 
Invited. 






For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can Now Buy That Hart, Schaffner Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit or Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary Clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



For Reliable Clothing See 

Bros 



Tailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



r 



II IIC 




CRUCIBLE 



Volume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, January 28, 1921 No. 7 



Editor-in-Chief 

ORIN J. FARRELL, '21 

Associates 

OLIVE E. DARLING, '21 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21 
AMMON HAAS, '21 
MIRIAM CASSEL, '22 



Literary 

RHODES R. STABLEY,' '22 
MAE REEVES, '23 
MARYAN P. MATUSZAK 
ELSIE BROWN/24 

Alumni 

LUCILE SHENK, '23 
Jokes and Exchanges 

HEBER MUTCH, '23 



Athletics 

GUY W. MOORE, '21 
HAROLD LUTZ, '23 

Music 

EMMA WITMEYER, '21 
BEULAH SWARTZBAUGH, '21 

Activities 
GEORGE O. HOHL, '23 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22 



Business Manager 

CARROLL R. DAUGHERTY, '21 
Assistants 

P. RODNEY KREIDER, '22 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23 
GASTON VANDEN BOSCHE, '2 2 
RALPH E. MARTIN 

Copyist 

ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23 



Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1910, at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single cop- 
ies, 15c each. 



EDITORIAL 

EXAMINATIONS 

We still cherish that delightful feeling which 
we felt just a short time ago when the old year 



Address all communications to Carroll R. 
Daugherty, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's 
hands before the second and fourth Friday of 
each month. 

passed into the new. There are very few chang- 
es in our lives that are more noticeable than this 
transition. As the hands of the old year release 
their grasp from us, there goes with it all those 
objectionable associations which tend to lead us 
farther away from those things that are just and 



134 



THE CRUCIBLE 



right. As the hour of twelve slowly approaches 
we are sensible of its weakening force and upon 
the stroke of the clock we are as a new being. 
It is then that the New Year extends its welcom- 
ing hand and presents to us all the privileges and 
liberties of living over again our lives to better 
advantage. The entire day is celebrated in 
feasts and festivity on the freedom we have gain- 
ed. However, it is not long until we are aware 
that life cannot continue on this road of pleasure, 
but that it takes hard work and sacrifice to ac- 
complish those things for which we long mostly. 

This week finds us in the same situation in rela- 
tion to our school-life. The first semester has 
ended and we are passing into the second. We 
look back with contemplation over the work that 
we have done. With some of it we are pleased, 
with the rest we are displeased. As the passing 
of the old year into the new was commemorated 
by rejoicing and celebrating, so must the passing 
of the first semester to the second be marked. 
No change comes about unobserved. We, there- 
fore, signalize this transition in the form of ex- 
aminations. 

When speaking of the academic life of a col- 
lege, the term, examination, immediately flashes 
before our minds. To most students examina- 
tions form a vital part of their courses; in fact, 
many students think only in terms of these tests. 
We should carefully guard ourselves against this 
habit. We study not to pass tests, but to receive 
the knowledge and discipline of the subject itself. 
The student who studies and works and makes an 
examination his goal in college life is the student 
who will strive merely to make money his groal in 
civil life. We should cultivate the habit of doing 
a particular act, not for the reward that results 
from it, but because we love to do it. The re- 
ward will take care of itself and will never fail 
to come if we have accomplished something 
worth-while. All the men of history, who aimed 
at power and fame as their ends, have been de- 
feated. Those who were earnest, sincere and un- 
selfish in their endeavors met success. 

There is something peculiar, almost mystical, 
about an examination. If a teacher asks his stu- 
dents whether they want a test, the answer will 
unquestionably be against one. But deep down 
in everyone's heart, there is a longing for it. An 
examination-less change from the old semester to 
the new semester would make our college life 
monotonous. We could not honestly agree to it. 
There is something about a test which makes it 
enjoyable. It is the satisfaction that we have 
done a work worth-while, and the consciousness 
that we have done the best of which we were cap- 
able. It is the reward given to us for doing a 
thing right. 

COMETS AS PORTENTS 

The Scientific American for the first week of 
January, 1921, reports that a new comet has been 
discovered by Skjellerup. Immediately, the as- 
tronomers begin to make observations in order to 
determine its orbit, to find out whether it will ever 



return to our solar system again or whether it will 
pass away forever. Then, too, they want to find 
out whether it will become conspicuous at any 
time in its course so that anybody can view it with 
the. naked eye. 

A thousand years ago or even yet five hundred 
years ago, the discovery of a comet would have 
aroused different discussion and investigation. The 
question would have been, Who is going to die 
now?, or again, Will we win the battle or will our 
enemies be triumphant? Men then believed with 
all certainty that a comet was divine messenger. 
The shape of the comet was studied by the astrol- 
ogers to determine what message this flaming 
sight in the heavens had to bring. 

Just the other day in my Cicero class, we read 
a portion in the Third Oration Against Catiline 
that helps to show how the Romans regarded 
comets as omens. It reads somewhat like this: 
"For like many other things that happened in our 
consulship, those things which are now done, as 
fire-brands seen in the evening in the western sky 

(and) others so that the immortal gods seem 

to be fortelling dire things." There are many 
other examples that could be given to show how 
the ancient Greeks and Hebrews and Persians 
and others believed in comets as portents. 

Josephus tells of a "comet in the form of a 
sword that hung over Jerusalem for a whole year 
together." This was in 69 A. D. and was thus 
supposed to account for the capture of Jerusalem 
the following year. It is possible that this could 
have been Halley's comet. An interesting little 
incident is related of the comet of 79 A. D. which 
was supposed to predict the death of Vespasian. 
Noticing of his servants whispering to each other 
about it, he remarked, "That hairy star does not 
portend evil to me. It menaces rather the king 
of the Parthians. He is the hairy man, but I am 
bald." 

Another happening which goes to show how 
great was the belief in comets as evil portents 
no matter what the incongruity of the appearance 
of the comet to the supposed evil might be, is that 
concerning Louis the Debonnair. In 837, while 
he was king of the Franks, a big comet appeared. 
Louis was sure that it portended his death, and 
the astrologers even acknowledged that such was 
the reason for its appearance. So the king acting 
upon his principle that "We must only fear Him 
who has created both us and the star," fasted 
and prayed long and hard and had the whole 
court do likewise. He built churches. He erect- 
ed monasteries. But alas! All this was of no 
avail ! In three years Louis died. And thus the 
mission of the comet was carried out. 

Like many another cherished popular feeling, 
the belief in comets as portents endured a long, 
hard death-struggle. This became especially se- 
vere about the sixteenth century when the dawn 
of modern science began to appear. The great 
theologians of the time scoffed the utterances of 
Galileo and Copernicus. They scornfully derided 
these pioneer scientists for trying to tamper with 



THE CR 

and even change the fundamental laws of astron- 
omy. And even in Newton's time, when the ma- 
jority 'of enlightened men no longer held rigidly 
to the idea that comets bring disaster, men began 
to fear that the collision of a comet with the earth 
or the falling of one of these bodies into the sun 
would destroy all mankind. 

But astronomers now know that comets are 
"Airy nothings", as one scientist has termed them. 
This knowledge has been gained by noticing that 
comets produce not the slightest affect upon any 
of the planets, while the orbit of a comet is very 
greatly changed if it happens to come near any 
planet. This almost inconceivably low density of 
comets means that we need fear nothing if ever 
one of these "airy nothings" should fall into the 
sun. And for the same reason there need be no 
alarm over the prospect of a collision with one of 
them. We actually did pass through the tail of 
Halley's comet and no one was able to notice it. 

It is curious to note that the approach of big 
comets has always been coincident with some 
great trouble. Every war has had its comet. 
There are yet living those who remember the 
comet of '61. Only 'one important war took place 
without a comet and that was the Franco-Prussian 
War of 1870. But our answer to all these coin- 
cidences is this: Ever since history began when 
was there a year in which there was not war, or 
famine, or pestilence, or deaths of great men or 
other sorrow? Comets or no comets, these things 
have always been here "to try men's souls." 

So we no longer look upon comets as governing 
the fortunes of men on this earth. Instead, mor- 
tal men now predict the fortunes of comets. 

— ORIN J. FARREL, '21. 

THE FINAL EXAM. 

(With apologies to Carrie Jacob Bond.) 

When you come to the end of a final exam 

And you look your paper through; 
And you think of the nights that you've had to 
cram 

And the things that you could not do ; 
You think at the end of the final exam, 

"Oh, what if I should flunk!" 
Then you look your paper all over again 

And decide it's worthless punk. 

Well, this is the end of a final exam, 
Near the end of your patience too. 

But it leaves a fear that is big and strong, 
With a wish that will ne'er come true. 

For your teacher has marked on that paper of 
yours 

With colors that never fade ; 
And you find at the end of the final exam 
Another "F" you've made. 

—I. M. DE NUTT, 



JCIBLE 135 

ELEGY WRITTEN IN A COUNTRY 
CHURCH-SCHOOL 

(With apologies to Gray.) 

The old clock tolls the hour of "Final" day; 
The vacuum heads slunk slowly o'er the path ; 
The Grimm professor grimly takes his chalk, 
And grasps the hour to satiate his wrath. 

No more shall knightly lad dare show his face 
To her back home ; his love with raven hair, 
No more shall she come near with all her grace 
To climb his knee, the envied kiss to share. 

The boast of Seniors, the pomp of class, 
All that either wealth or standing gave. 
In that dark, doleful hour shall be but gas, 
And those whose hearts were light will here be 
grave. 

Can storied cuff or animated "Line" 

Back to its vacuum call the precious "dope"? 

Can condescending voice call pity forth 

Or flattery bribe the prof, to give more "rope"? 

Full many a gem of classic Greek serene, 
The dark, deep pockets of the Student bear; 
Full many a boy and girl have blushed unseen, 
When first they took their "pony" from its lair. 

Next day, with orders due in sad array, 
We'll see his trunk borne sadly to the train, 
And on the board we'll read the epitaph. 
Self-written, just before he hits the lane. 

"Here rested my head upon a tablet arm. 
A youth to Fortune and to Fame unknown. 
Hard Science frowned on every snooze I took 
And all the profs, agreed to send me home." 

—CARL W. HISER, '22. 

FIT'S HONEST VERDICT 
IV. Dormitory Lift in College. 

My room is not in a house. It is in a dormitory. 
They are a big concern very much like the hotel 
in the town near our cabin, only more so. But 
it would be plum foolishness to guess at what's in- 
side from seein' the outside. You never could. 
It's sorta like a secret society I heard about oncet. 
You never know till you get inside. I feel like 
the world should not be kept in ignorance an' 



136 



THE CRUCIBLE 



darkness longer an' so I am prom' at risk of life 
and limb to make sum reflections. 

Dormitory life is composed of ups and downs 
an' ins an' outs. To the Freshman it is mostly 
downs an' outs. When one comes in he is lucky 
to get to his room without taking a bathe against 
his will. 

A couple experiences will be sufficient to the 
wise. 

I was cummin in one nite about 9 :30 an' I saw 
a half naked figger with a big bucket in hand. 
Of course I knew something was wrong, so I 
started to make no delay in movin' away. He 
threw bucket an' all at me, both missing me by 
about 2 inches, I guess. I new it would never be 
safe fer me to fro up the main stairway so I 
sneaked aroun' like an Injun in the dark an' start- 
ed up the hook an' ladders they have stickin' out 
o' the windows. It was a safe and sane venture 
for none of 'em heard me, though I was a guessin' 
every minute would be the last, an' that the next 
would find me a drownded man. I had dunn a 
wise thing. I've been very lucky in my life that 
way. Nobodv heard me bat an eye. I ran into 
my room which I thought would be a shelter from 
anv big to-do thev might want to have. Just 
a few minutes later a boy came, nocked on my 
door an' when I politely onened it he did the un- 
merciful, dasterlig thing of plunging two buckets 
of water into my face which also ran down my 
whole bodv. night close and all. Now of course 
that would be imnodent anywhere but in college, 
an' furthermore I woodent a taken it anywhere 
else, but they said if I was a good sport that sum 
dav it 'ud come my turn. 

The outside world thinks dormitories are to 
sleep in but in college you never sleep. At least 
I never do an' a lot more don't unless thev aro 
powerful sleep walkers. They have lites here all 
night an' water night an' dav, hot an' cold, but 
mostly cold. It's a grate life they all seem to 
think pn' maybe I'll see it that way sum time too. 

Mebbe you'd like me to tell you about class 
next time. 

—DAVID FIT. 

ADVANTAGES OF BEING A FRESHMAN 

Thanks be to the all-powerful gods that I'm a 
Freshman! Is there any other class that has so 
many advantages? No sir! Not so long as I 
prove myself worthy of remaining in it. 

Freshmen always have the seats of honor in 
chapel. A Sophomore or any other upperclass- 
man is compelled to turn around in order to look 
at his nresent-day recipient of his esteemed fa- 
vors. Not so with the Freshman — he has the en- 
tire bevy of cosmetic-worshippers under his eye, 
and he can delight on the beautiful spectacle 
without bein<r held up to the ridicule of any lower- 
classmen. Then, too, who but a Freshman is so 
situated that he can read his chemistry book or 
French grammar instead of being lifted to the 
vocal heights afforded by the words of song? Too 
near the faculty are ye, O ye upper-class Phari- 
sees! 

The members of the first-year class always wait 



until all others have entered the chapel. In this 
way, we Freshmen have the great advatage of 
becoming acquainted with the upper-classmen and 
with their history-in-the-making in the quickest 
possible way. All romances and scandals that 
upper-classmen are so foolish as to undertake or 
to participate in, by this method, come under the 
all--3eeing eyes of the Freshmen. No one can es- 
cape — all must march before the judges. 

None but my class has been so wisely directed 
in the use of the morning exercise. Why is it 
that so many of the upper-classmen appear so 
emaciated and with that would-to-God-L-had- 
studied-it-last-night look on their faces? i 'Tis be- 
cause, dear reader, they have not the wisdom of 
taking a morning walk, after chapel, around the 
Administration Building, before going to the tor- 
tures within. Besides, We Freshmen make it an 
act of honor to always use the paths in crossing 
the campus. Thus it is that, we do not wither un- 
der the scathing rebukes of that sternfaced hu- 
man, Doctor Daniel Gossard, who in one person 
represents a Bachelor of Divinity, a Doctor of Di- 
vinity, and the Most High President of this centre 
of learning and culture! 'Tis not the Freshmen 
•that so sacrilegiously spoil the beauty of God's 
green campus by trampling his handiwork under- 
foot. Only upper-classmen are capable of so do- 
ing, for Freshmen hold sacred grass and its color. 

Freshmen never enter the dining hall until all 
others have cone in. This shows that we are very 
much superior in manners and in breeding and 
there are no gourmands in our exalted class. 
Freshmen are never so unmannerly as to get to- 
gether in a group and to capture a detached table 
rnd to start a free-for-all battery fire, objectives 
being their resnective food-inlets. Ah, no! Fresh- 
men wait a trifle and then are honorably escorted 
by an upper-class waiter to some seat between 
two picture-like girls. The persons who show 
themselves to be most mannerly and most observ- 
ant of the superfluous rights of others are invar- 
iably members of the Freshman class. 

We Freshmen always have the largest number 
of members. It is the most popular class. Pro- 
fessors, therefore, accord special privileges to its 
members. In examinations one may open his 
book to look for the answer to some unlooked-for 
question, provided, of course, that the act be not 
so conspicuous that everyone might observe. It 
is a fact that professors cannot ask as many ques- 
tions per head in a Freshman class as in any other 
class. This makes it very much easier to bluff 
through a recitation than in any other class. In 
sneaking of these matters, however, I must say 
that our class is also very exclusive. If a mem- 
ber falls below the grades which one might ex- 
pect of him, he is asked — politely, >of course, as 
befitting the dignity of the class — to perform his 
nefarious activities in some other class. This is 
not true in upper-classes — their members are al- 
ways netted and coddled like infants, due to their 
ovev-tended brains, which bubble over with the 
rudiments of knowledge. 

One might believe that Freshmen have no ad- 
vantages in the mid-night performances at the 
Dorm. This belief is erroneous. Freshmen sub- 
mit to the childish activities of the upper-class- 



THE CRUCIBLE 



137 



men in order to humor them, just as fathers humor 
their mustache-pulling offspring. 'Tis Freshmen 
that secure most frequently the baptisms of the 
night. In this way, we are washed of our upper- 
class high school over-knowledge. And we, by 
this same performance, give occasion to have the 
floors frequently washed, thus living up to the 
most scientific principles of this disease-fighting 
age. 

To conclude, I must say that of all the classes 
the greatest advantages obtainable are secured 
only by being one of the green-crowned members 
of the Freshman class. 

— MARYAN P. MATUSZAK, '24. 

REVIVAL SWEEPS THE STUDENT BODY 

Lebanon Valley College is in the grip of a great 
revival. Prayers that have been ascending to the 
Throne of Grace for months are being answered 
according to the promises. Anxious hearts have 
been looking forward to the time when the student 
body would be moved by the Spirit of God. On 
January 2nd at 7 P. M. Rev. W. A. Knapp, of 
Westerville, Ohio, with his assisting singer. Rev. 
Orr A. Cheek, began a protracted meeting in the 
United Brethren church. Hearts were moved, 
and many who had been held by the spirit of 
lethargy reclaimed God's promises and were re- 
vived. From the faculty to the student body 
there was a general awakening. 

Monday night, the lt7h, proved to be an event- 
ful night. The students assembled at the Con- 
servatory and thence proceeded to the church. It 
was an impressive religious demonstration. Like 
a mighty river they moved on toward the sacred 
edifice. When within Rev. Knapp asked for a 
college yell. Cheer Leader Farrel sprang to his 
feet, jumped onto the rostrum, and lead the stu- 
dent body in their familiar yells. "The sermon was 
"The Return of Jesus to Earth." The subject was 
presented clearlv, forcefully, and with touching 
effect. The invitation was given. The students 
were gripped by the Holy Spirit, and there follow- 
ed the dedication and reconstruction of a goodly 
number of young people. 

One of the greatest prayer meetings ever held 
at L. V. was held in the Boys' Dormitory from 10 
to 11:30 that night. Songs, prayers and testi- 
monies made it a meeting long to be remembered. 
These prayer meetings are being continued in all 
three dormitories. 

We have learned that God is able to save unto 
the uttermost, and that there is a vital reality in 
the religion of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. 

BENNETT'S LECTURE 

The fourth and last Star Course number of this 
season was given on Friday evening, January 14, 
in the college chapel. If not the best of the sea- 
son, it most certainly can be ranked as a first- 
class lecture. The only regret is that not more 
of the student body were present. 

William Rainey Bennett delivered a very sin- 
cere and forcefui lecture, one that blended with 
our trend of thought and that brought home to us 
in a new way truths which we realize. 



The keynote of the lecture seemed to be PEO- 
PLE. Mr. Bennett introduced his thought by ask- 
ing, "What do we do when we go to sleep?" 
By well-chosen illustrations, he told us about that 
wonderful thing — our subconscious mind. There 
is a secret spring which one must touch in order 
that our lives may vibrate in harmony with the 
world, a center of vibration which we must touch. 

Speaking more definitely, Mr. Bennett told us 
that college men and women in general cannot 
see; they don't know facts; they cannot concen- 
trate; they cann'ot think. An accumulation of 
book-knowledge, a diploma and a degree are the 
things with which we enter the world of service. 

But the world is not in need of this type; in 
fact, it cannot use them. It is the man or woman 
worth good common sense that is needed — some- 
one who can deliver the goods. 

We cannot expect a road without obstructions. 
Our way will be filled with stumbling blocks, hut 
it is only he who picks himself up the last time 
that will win. Our aim should not be to succeed 
— to go to seed; rather, to follow a flying goal. 
How high our aims should be when we think that 
no one has ever measured the depth of the human 
soul, touched the light of imagination, or spanned 
the intellect. From whence cometh this great 
strength, this wealth of knowledge, and great 
power, but from the heavens and from God. 

We must learn to play ourselves completely; 
to hit from the center of vibration. All great 
things that have been achieved have been paid 
for in deep sincerity of purpose and full consecra- 
tion to the love of God. We must have a mes- 
sage, which we can give to the world. Music is 
a message from the soul. A sincere voice touches 
the heart and makes it grow. Sincerity leads to 
God. 

Today the slogan w "Tell the Truth." You 
cannot sing, speak, build, sell or live a lie. Jesus 
is the master of men ard of the mind. The mes- 
sage he gives us we are to take to the people. 
We won't live in a college atmosphere and amon<r 
college chums forever. We must go out and find 
the people. Living human beings are the things 
worth-while after all. Feeding and clothing Eu- 
rope is a greater task than the war was, for we 
are constructing a league of sympathy of friends. 

Should we attempt to classify people we might 
group them under three headings; business group, 
professional group and feminine group. Each of 
these three groups has a vital, but difficult prob- 
lem to solve. The business man has the whole 
horizon before him. It is no longer a divided 
world, but one united whole. If China falls, we 
fall. The teachers and preachers have in their 
hands the destiny of the future generation; it is 
theirs to teach, guide and direct. The woman's 
"reat problem is; "What if I never get married?" 
The war has left us minus the cream of our man- 
hood. Morals are low. Bolshevism is astir. An- 
other war would mean our ruin. It is up to the 
woman to right these conditions. 

We will fail in our work' if we are selfish, un- 
social; we must find our people. If we seek to 
save ourselves, we will be lost. We must lose 
ourselves and be saved. 



138 



THE CRUCIBLE 



OUR FIRST MOVIES 

On Thursday evening, January 6, our chapel 
was converted from its usual place of worship in- 
to a real, first-class theater. 

The picture, "Passers By", a super-production 
by J. Stuart Blackton, was the first of a series of 
high-class productions which will be shown here 
this winter. It was well-attended by both the 
students and the townspeople. 

Many of the students were in fear that they 
would not be allowed to attend but late in the af- 
ternoon, all man-campuses were lifted, which re- 
sulted in some twenty more students attending the 
show. How happy these were that evening when 
they marched into the chapel with HIM where re- 
served seats in the rear of the room were waiting 
to receive them! 

Lights were snapped out. Music, of that high 
class always delivered by Mr. Ruth, silenced the 
chattering crowd. 

In a few minutes, we were sitting in a most 
wonderful, magnificent mansion in London. On 
this particular night there was an extraordinary 
heavy fog. We sat at the window looking out up- 
on the passers-by. Some were richly clad. Some 
rode in big, shining automobiles. Many others, 
just as poor as these were rich, came stumbling 
along in the dense fog. 

Thud! Ugh! Directly in front of our house, a 
poor, miserable wretch was struck down by a 
fast-moving automobile, as he had attempted to 
cross the street. He struck the hard, wet pave- 
ment with such force, that an "Ugh!", uttered by 
him, was audible even in the rear of the house. 
We took him in and cared for him. He was given 
a bath, a haircut and a shave, and then he was 
donned in stylish, new clothes, and turned out in- 
to the world to begin again, when — 

Lights were snapped on. Enchanting music 
ceased to fill the very atmosphere. All moved 
from whence they had come, so awe-stricken were 
they. Upon reaching our rooms, we still lingered 
on that trance — in that far-away, which the music 
and all had brought upon us. 

Now it all grew very plain. We realized fully 
what a wonderful picture we had seen, and all 
went to their beds, hoping that the next movie 
would come soon again. 

THE SCIENTIFIC CLUB 

The Scientific Club resumed its regular meet- 
ings, following the Christmas vacation, on Thurs- 
day evening, January 13, 1921. An instructive 
and very interesting program was presented. Mr. 
Earl S. Gingrich, president, explained in detail the 
processes used in the concentration of copper ores. 
Having been employed at a plant where copper 
ores are concentrated, Mr. Gingrich was very well 
acquainted with his subject. His explanation of 
the details of the process and the purpose of the 
different apparati was illustrated by comprehen- 
sive diagrams carefully drawn on the blackboard. 
One of the interesting things brought out in his 
lecture was the physical means of separating the 
iron from the copper with large revolving drums 
electric magnets. The speaker gave opportunity 



for some healthy thinking by giving the percent- 
ages of the substances composing the material at 
different stages of the process of concentration. 

Another feature of the program was presented 
by Mr. Harold B. Bender. His subject was on the 
measurement of the snowfall in our western moun- 
tains and, as most of his hearers were not accus- 
tomed to the peaks of the West and the heavy 
snows of that region, Mr. Bender was compelled 
to stimulate their imaginations. His talk, cen- 
tered on the new system that is coming into use 
to measure the snowfall. It is necessary to do this 
measuring in order to prepare for the thawing 
of the snow. The snow water is used for irriga- 
tion and is, therefore, of vital importance to the 
producers in the valleys. Precautions must also 
sometimes be taken to avert floods. The new 
method, by means of which the exact depth of the 
snow in any place is determined, accurately fore- 
tells what can be expected when the snow begins 
to thaw. 

Some of the most interesting of recent happen- 
ings in the world of science were discussed by Mr. 
Maryan Matuszak. Chief among his discussions 
were the manifold applications of radium that 
have recently been put into practice. Among 
other things he discussed the method that is being 
used in Germany to increase plant production. 
The air above the growing plants is charged with 
carbon dioxide gas, which is secured from the 
waste gases of factories and blast furnaces. Sul- 
phur and all injurious gases are first eliminated. 
In the near future this system will be put on a 
commercial basis. As a result of this system 
plants of twice the size and of much better qual- 
ity than the ordinary variety have been raised. 

The Scientific Club is fast becoming one of the 
most popular organizations at Lebanon Valley 
College. Messrs. Sherk and Wenner were admit- 
ted to membership in the business session. As 
the name implies, the club is composed of the 
students and teachers interested in the three 
sciences of chemistry, physics and biology. It is 
desirable that everyone taking these subjects 
should join. Girls are especially urged to do so 
as they will frequently get pointers that will be 
of great practical value when they take up house- 
keeping. The club is anxious that everybody be 
benefitted by his existence. Everyone is invited 
to the meetings, no matter what his aim in life 
may be and whether he wishes to join or not. 
There is something of value for all at each meet- 
ing. Meetings are held in the Chemistry Lec- 
ture Room, Administration Building, on the sec- 
ond and fourth Thursdays of each school month at 
7:15 P.M. 

DR. RUNK EXPRESSES APPRECIATION 

There is nothing that could have taken away 
the depression and homesickness that we have all 
felt since our Christmas holidays like the services 
that Reverends Knapp and Cheek have been con- 
ducting since our return. They have taken our 
thoughts away from the joys of vacation and 
brought them into a more settled and peaceful 
state. For who is it that does not enjoy a good 
sermon presented by some noble man of God? 



THE CRUCIBLE 



139 



Rev. Knapp has been in the evangelistic work 
for eight years and is thoroughly efficient in the 
art of soul-winning. His sermons were designed 
to rouse the indifferent and cause conviction in the 
hearts of the unsaved and this they have done 
to an astonishingly degree. Throughout his en- 
tire discourses he showed rare judgment and 
tact in the presentation of the gospel to the un- 
saved, presenting arguments so forceful and con- 
vincing that only the 'obstinate could withstand 
them. 

Probably even more beneficial than the ser- 
mons, however, was the Bible study conducted in 
the afternoons. A very large number of the 
students regularly attended these and found 
depths of meaning in the Bible of which they had 
never dreamed. 

But without the able assistance of Rev. Cheek, 
who has been an evangelistic singer for nearly 
eight years, the services would not have held all 
the attraction they did. Because many times a 
man may be impressed more by one beautiful 
gospel song than by a dozen sermons concerning 
the same theme. It was with deep regret on the 
part of all that Rev. Cheek was called away be- 
fore the final services but Dr. Runk filled his place 
in such a splendid way that we were well recom- 
pensed for his loss. 

The college feels deeply grateful to Dr. Runk 
for his forethought in planning these services, for 
as early as last spring he had arranged these 
meetings in order to unite the church and the col- 
lege in one great revival. His plans have suc- 
ceeded far beyond his anticipations and justify 
them to a flattering: degree, inasmuch as the col- 
lege has taken hold upon the things from which 
they were slowly drifting away and started again 
with a new aim and a higher purpose. The splen- 
did co-operation of the college has been very 
pleasing to Dr. Runk and he wishes to express 
his deepest appreciation of it by means of the 
Crucible which reaches every student and is read 
with much avidity by them. The fine spirit which 
has been shown by the college cannot help but 
result in good for it and this is already being 
shown in the lives of the young men and women 
who have taken their stand for Christ. 

OUR CHESS CLUB 

Among the several organizations which have 
originated this year, not the least of these in pur- 
pose, brains, and good fellowship is our Chess 
Club. Though we do not equal other organiza- 
tions in membership, the percentage is very en- 
couraging, and interest is being aroused. The 
club is hampered somewhat for suitable head- 
quarters, but this, it is hoped, may be remedied 
soon. Chess is by far the most intellectual and 
.strategic game ever invented, far superior to 
checkers, its nearest rival, and has always appeal- 
ed to students, fighters, and savants. The game 
in its fundamentals is known to have existed four 
thousand years ago, and the germ of it must have 
existed long before that. Growing, as it has 
been, all these milleniums, Chess has become al- 
most perfect, and such men as Franklin, Voltaire, 
Francis Bacon and many other intellectuals have 



accorded it great praise as a mental stimulus and 
discipline. 

The officers at present are: Honorary Presi- 
dent, Dr. I. E. Runk; President, H. R. Mutch; V. 
Pres., E. C. Hastings; Sec, C. Z. Runk; Treas.. 
H. B. Bender. Anyone interested and wishing 
to learn the beauties of the game get in touch 
with these officers, who will show you just what 
you have missed. 

At a recent meeting of the Club, the following 
men were added to its list of membership : Wm. 
Weiser, Carrol Daugherty, and Vande Sandt, 
strong Lebanon players, and Camillo Ruiz, a fast 
player from Yucatan. 

VICTORIES OF THE QUINTETTE 

After their successful southern trip the Blue 
and White five added two more scalps to their 
string, taking one game from the Lebanon All 
Collegians in Lebanon on Jan. 13 and flooring 
Blue Ridge College's cage quintet for the second 
count in the college gymnasium on Jan. 15. 

Expectations were for an interesting game 
with the Lebanon All Collegians, among whose 
personnel are "Polly" Strickler and "Joe" Holl- 
inger, two former Blue and White stars, and those 
expectations were fully met. A month before the 
All Collegians had come to Annville and hung a 
32 to 29 defeat on the L. V. boys after a hard- 
fought game and Captain M'oore's men were ex- 
pecting a more difficult tussle since they were to 
play the All Collegians on the latter's floor. But 
since their defeat of Dec. 13 the Blue and White 
tossers had made a marked improvement and 
when they met Captain Strickler's cage rompers 
they played like an entirely different team and 
consequently had little difficulty in getting a lead 
early in the game and maintaining it throughout 
the fray until when the final whistle sounded the 
score stood 33 to 27. In the initial game with 
the All Collegians Captain Moore was so closely 
guarded that he could make but one field goal 
but in the second game he cut loose from the op- 
posing guards and caged no less than eight bas- 
kets. 

The line-up : 
Lebanon Valley Position 



Stauffer 

Wolfe 

Wolf 

(Stabley) 
Cohen 

(Homan) 
Moore 



Forward 
Forward 
Center 

Guard 

Guard 



All Collegians 

Strickler 

Quinn 

Hollinger 

Black 



Havard 
(Harpel) 

Field goals — Moore 8, Wolfe 3, Strickler 3, 
Stauffer 2, Wolf 2, Quinn 2, Hollinger 2, Black. 
Foul goals — Moore, 3 out of 8; Quinn, 10 out of 
16; Hollinger, 1 out of 4. Referee — Bell. 

Captain Moore duplicated his goal shooting 
feat in the Blue Ridge game on Jan. 15, his south- 
paw accounting again for eight goals. "Giggs" 
was well supported by the entire team, each mem- 
ber of which scored at least one field goal, and it 
was no difficult matter to vanquish the boys from 
New Windsor, Md. To date Captain Moore has 




140 



THE CRUCIBLE 



46 field goals to his credit and has scored a total 
of 133 points for his team. 

The line-up for the Blue Ridge game was : 
Blue Ridge Position Lebanon Valley 

Bonsack Forward Stauffer 

(Spicher) (Cohen) 
Burdette Forward Wolfe 

Dunbar Center Wolf 

(Stabley) 

Dunn Guard Cohen 

(Homan) 

Jones Guard Moore 

Filed goals — Moore 8, Burdette 6, Bonsack 2, 
Stauffer 2, Cohen 2, Stabley 2, Dunbar, Wolfe, 
W'0']f, Homan. Foul goals — Bonsack, 4 out of 
10: Burdette, 2 out of 4; Dunbar, out of 1; 
Moore, 12 out of 19. Referee — Stine. 

THE TEAM'S TRIP 

Winning two out of three games our boys ended 
the most successful trip undertaken by any ath- 
letic team representing our institution. On 
Thursday, January 6, our team defeated Blue 
Ridge College by the overwhelming score of 52 
to 20. Leaving New Windsor for Chestertown, 
they were forced to travel from 9 A. M. until 7 
P. M. and upon t^eir arrival there, were hurried 
on to the floor. After forty minutes of football, 
Washington College emerged victorious to the 
tune of 21 to 20, due mostly to the vigilant eyes 
of the referee in detecting fouls committed by 
our team and in failing to detect theirs. Our 
twelve fouls to their one tells the tale. Our boys 
claim that if there is such an animal as a moral 
victory, we sure won one there. "Ruby" Cohen 
starred in this game by his spectacular shooting. 

On Saturday, January, the last game of the 
trip was played and the boys surely did things 
brown. Spurred on by the cheers of four Alumni, 
Snoke, Haverstock, Mease and Hartman, our 
boys trimmed the Gallaudet University five bv 
the score of 41 to 26. This was the first defeat 
suffered by Gallaudet thir, year, and they were so 
well-pleased with our boyn that they said that we 
had the fastest and cleanest team ever seen there 
within the last five years. 

Our treatment was of the best on the trip, with 
the exception of t^at received at Washington Col- 
lege. At Gallaudet University, an institution for 
the deaf and dumb, our treatment was very gent- 
lemanly. It is interesting to note on the side that 
these fellows are represented in all branches of 
sports a^d they are no easy picking either. 

BLOVIATION BLOW-OUT 

A real honest-to-goodness bloviation party be- 
gan in Room 35 of the boys' dormitory after the 
basketball game on Saturday evening, Jan. 15, 
and, unlike the majority of such events, it failed 
to break up quietly. The number of Taurus 
throwers increased gradually until finally the 
room was so crowded that the heat of the discus- 
sion c?"?ed expansion and the guests at the party 
poured out into the halls of the dormitory. Their 
deliberations were temporarily silenced but the 



silence gave way without delay to yells intended 
to rouse every resident of the dormitory. Al- 
though the big clock in the administration build- 
ing had long since struck twelve, male students 
in bath robes, pajamas and various sorts of non- 
descript garb poured forth into the halls. Anoth- 
er expansion was necessary so out onto the campus 
the enlargened band proceeded and did not halt 
until they had reached the college residence of 
the girl students. In front of that august build- 
ing they gave vent to songs and yells which fright- 
ened the young women almost out of their wits 
and still unsatisfied with their work the gang pro- 
ceeded to the conservatory where they added to 
their number. 

Then followed a triumphal return to the dorm, 
and after that a continuation of the interrupted 
party with an impromptu program of music, 
drama and speeches. Freak dancing by Scoody 
Matchton, a vocal solo by John Frank, megaphone 
solo by Fat Troutman, acrobatic feats by Orin 
Farrell, contortion act by "Doug" Beidel, '20, 
(leader of the mob), selection by a quartette and 
several vaudeville sketches by Matchton and 
Gough with Stabley as accompanist. After ex- 
hausting the supply of talent present, the party 
disbanded (time — 2 A. M.). 

THE MEN'S CONVENTION 

Not many nights ago there gathered in a room 
of the B'oys' Dorm a motley assemblage of stu- 
dents, members of all classes from Freshmen to 
Seniors, and of all sizes from "Nig" Faust to 
"Bull" Behman. Now it happens that these men 
are all thinkers, greatly interested in the pressing 
problems of the day. Quite naturally then the 
discussion soon turned to a very important sub- 
ject to college men. Sides were inevitably taken. 
And soon an informal debate was in full swing. 
Arguments flew thick and fast and loud. It came 
about this way. Rhodes Stabley announced a 
conviction of his on a certain subject, which was 
severely contested by the majority of those pres- 
ent. He grew eloquent. Perched with one foot 
on the window and the 'other on the door knob, 
he let flow a stream of oratory ably defending his 
side of the question. Noble man he was to face 
in such fashion a concordance of opposition. The 
others tried tirelessly to convince the Quittie Ed- 
itor; but he held fast. 

A few evenings later the same group of think- 
ers happened to gather again in "Birdie" Renn's 
room. The subject of the former debate was re- 
sumed. But alas! There was no room for ar- 
gument. Stabley had given the matter serious 
thought in the meantime, and amid great cheers 
he announced his conversion. So The Conven- 
tion now stands agreed on the following question 

In order to promote fruitful discussion and de- 
bate these thirteen men have organized. "Birdie" 
and "Bull" were close to a tie for president, "Bir- 
die" having a slight lead. Stabley got the job of 
secretary, while Frank was elected to hold the 
purse strings. On Monday, the 17th, The Con- 
vention had its picture taken with the members 
dressed in the official garb — pajamas. 



THE CRUCIBLE 141 

Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Supplies 
Guitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Music 
Music Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 



See the New Fall Styles 

in 




The Shoeman 
"The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 
see 

J* S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F*o. 



Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and porting 
Goods? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E< M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



142 



THE 



CRUCIBLE 



THE 

CRYSTAL 

Restaurant 

C. D. Papachristos 
John Boutselis 

OPPOSITE PENNSYLVANIA 
RAILROAD STATION 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sport 

Kodaks Toys 
Bicycles Guns 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 
205 MARKET STREET 

Harrisburg, Penna. 
Ladles* and Gentlemen's Furnishings 

KIN PORTS 

Annville, Pa 

Students' Discount 

Packard and American Lady 
SHOES 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



SPALDING 




Athletic 

Equipment 

For 

Every 

Indoor 

And 

Outdoor 

Sport 



BASKET BALL, BOXING 
GYMNASIUM CLOTHING 
ICE SKATES AND SHOES 

Send for Catalogue 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
126 Nassau St. N. Y. 



CLOTHING 

FOR 

Well Dressed 
MEN 

McFall & Son 

Third & Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



143 



Q 
U 
A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



QUALITY C 

BURDAN'S I 
ICE V 

CREAM I 

E 



SERVICE 



£o"v?er ^Prices 

Our Entire <§toe^ of (jDoolens 

Try U§> for yottar 

NEW SUIT 

Smartest <§t\jfes 

Oarry vAoWer 

epreset\tit>g 55roWi\u\g, ^King at\cl 




Bakery anndl E5©stomimffiilt 

Piiirst Glass M©als 
Ftewly PwMsfedl R^oims 
WSftlh IR^MMSiKig Wafer 

3Cersfte^ s Superior 

ream 



144 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Mewgard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 
Dealers 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Harry Zimmerman, D. D.S. 



DENTAL PARLORS 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



72 West Main St. 



Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them- We Rebuild and Reweid Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save. Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



W. R. WALTZ 

BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
See if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 



2nd Walnut Streets 



HARRISBURG, PA 



J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 

Cakes, Tobacco 
Oysters and Fish in Season 
E. Main Street Annville, Pa. 



D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 



Dealers in 



LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



W 7VY Rohland 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 




Remodeled Refurnished 
European Plan Rooms $1.50 

Hotel Walton 

Fred Ehrhorn, Proprietor 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Lebanon, F^ol 

Harvey L. Seltzer 
One Price Clothier 

And 

Men's Furnishings 

The House of Good Values 
769 Cumberland Street, 




Do You Want 

Room Furnishings 
Household Goods 

H Miller 

A1SISVILLE, PA 



Fresh and Smoked Meats 
Poultry, Milk, Butter 

3 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Miss L. A. Krum 

Millinery 

And 

Exclusive Shop for Women 

119 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Fink's Bakery 

Best Baked Products 

You Pay for the Articles. 

Quality and Service Cost You 
Nothing ! 

Quality Service 

Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hostetter 

217 E. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



"The Live Store" "Always Reliable" 

The Store Everybody Is 
Talking About 

DOUTRICHS 

We Can Sell You 

Guaranteed Clothes 

That Will Give You Satisfaction 

or 

Refund Your Money 

$35 - $40 - $45 

This Is The Harrisburg Home 

of 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx; Kuppenheimer 

and 

Society Brand Clothes 

Harrisburg, Penna. 



CRUCIBLE 

FEBRUARY 11, 1921 




The Finest 




gs in 







The 





5^ 






Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 



" The Official Blue and White Mhop' 



$1.00 a Week 



L MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF 



Watch and Diamond 



The P. W Caplan Co. 



The Different Kind of Jewelry 



12,06 Majtket Street 

Harrisburg, Pa 



H. J< COLOVIRAS Mi S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers I 



OF ALL KIJSDS OF 



GRADE 



CHOCOLATES, BtjOlS SONS, 
CARA MELSi : ETC ;/ H 




Ice Cream and Sodm 

LA RGBS TANOmqST MA GNlft j 
"j" ICENT ICE 'CR^AM PAR^Vfi 
LOR IIS CENTRAL PA. 

331 MarkeA Street 



THE CRUCIBLE 



145 



Q 

U 

A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



QUALITY 




SERVICE 



S 

E 
R 
V 
I 

C 
E 



£o^er ^Prices 

(Dur Entire <§toc^ of (jDoofei\s 

Try US for yomir 

NEW SUIT 

Smartest <§t\jf 



es 



am vA 



oWer 



5" aifor, £ Represei>tii>g 55roWt>ii>g» 3*\ing ai^cl (2o. 




OgM LtuiHiGlkos fflMdl 
FSirst Class M©sals 
N©wly Fmiffffliislkedl IRodDiMs 
WSttlh RMfflfflSMg Water 

3Cersf\e\j s Superior 
C/ce ©ream 




How is a Wireless 

Message Received? 

EVERY incandescent lamp has a filament. Mount a metal 
plate on a wire in the lamp near the filament. A current 
leaps the space between the filament and the plate when the 
filament glows. 

Edison first observed this phenomenon in 1883. Hence it was 
called the "Edison effect." 

Scientists long studied the "effect" but they could not explain 
it satisfactorily. Now, after years of experimenting with Crookes 
tubes, X-ray tubes and radium, it is known that the current that leaps 
across is a stream of "electrons"— exceedingly minute particles nega- 
tively charged with electricity. 

These electrons play an important part in wireless communica- 
tion. When a wire grid is interposed between the filament and the 
plate and charged positively, the plate is aided in drawing electrons 
across; but when the grid is charged negatively it drives back the elec- 
trons. A very small charge applied to the grid, as small as that re- 
ceived from a feeble wireless wave, is enough to vary the electron 
stream. 

So the grid in the tube enables a faint wireless impulse to control 
the very much greater amount of energy in the flow of electrons, and 
so radio signals too weak to be perceived by other means become per- 
ceptible by the effects that they produce. Just as the movement of 
a throttle controls a great locomotive in motion, so a wireless wave, 
by means of the grid, affects the powerful electron stream. 

All this followed from studying the mysterious "Edison effect" — 
a purely scientific discovery. 

No one can foresee what results will follow from research in pure 
science. Sooner or later the world must benefit practically from the 
discovery of new facts. 

For this reason the Research Laboratories of the General Electric 
Company are concerned as much with investigations in pure science 
as they are with the improvement of industrial processes and products. 
They, too, have studied the "Edison effect" scientifically. The result 
has been a new form of electron tube, known as the " pliotron" , a type 
of X-ray tube free from the vagaries of the old tube; and the "kene- 
tron", which is called by electrical engineers a "rectifier" because it 
has the property of changing an alternating into a direct current. 

All these improvements followed because the Research Labora- 
tories try to discover the "how" of things. Pure science always 
justifies itself. 



General Office COHIQpSlW Schenectady, N.Y. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



147 



THE 

CRYSTAL 

Restaurant 

C. D. Papachristos 
John Boutselis 

OPPOSITE PENNSYLVANIA 
RAILROAD STATION 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sport 

Kodaks Toys 
Bicycles Guns 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 
205 MARKET STREET 

Harrisburg, Penna. 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Furnishings 

KIN PORTS 

Annvllle, Pa 

Students' Discount 

Packard and American Lady 
SHOES 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



SPALDING 



Athletic 

Equipment 

For 

Every 

Indoor 

And 

Outdoor 

Sport 



BASKET BALL, BOXING 
GYMNASIUM CLOTHING 
ICE SKATES AND SHOES 

Send for Catalogue 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
126 Nassau St. N. Y. 




CLOTHING 

FOR 

Well Dressed 
MEN 

McFall & Son 

Third & Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



148 

In stock now, and 
Coming through 
Daily. Low shoes 
For young men and 
Women, designed 
By this shop 
Particularly for 



THE CRUCIBLE 

Young Men and Women 
Who Demand Smart Footwear 
Go to the 

WALK -OVER 

226 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Our college 
Clientele. 
Imported Scotch 
Grain in heavy 
Stitched models. 
Your inspection 
Invited. 





For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can Now Buy That Hart, Schaffner <3c Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit or Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



For Reliable Clothing See 




I 




Tailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



r 




Vol ume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, February 11, 1921 No. 8 



Editor-in-Chief 

ORIN J. FARRELL, '21 

Associates 

OLIVE E. DARLING, '21 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21 
AMMON HAAS, '21 
MIRIAM CASSEL, '22 



Literary 

RHODES R. STABLEY, '22 
MAE REEVES, '23 
MA RYAN P. MATUSZAK'24 
ELSIE BROWN, 24 

Alumni 

LUCILE SHENK, '23 

Jokes and Exchanges 

HEBER MUTCH, '23 



Athletics 

GUY W. MOORE, '21 
HAROLD LUTZ, '23 
Music 

EMMA WITMEYER, '21 
BEULAH SWARTZBAUGH, '21 

Activities 
GEORGE O. HOHL, '23 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22 
RUTH OYER, '24 



Business Manager 

CARROLL R. DAUGHERTY, '21 
J DONALD EVANS, '24 

Assistants 

P. RODNEY KREIDER, '22 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23 
GASTON VANDEN BOSCHE, '2 2 
RALPH E. MARTIN 

Copyist 

ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23 



Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1910, at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single cop- 
ies, 15c each. 



Address all communications to Carroll R. 
Daugherty, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's 
hands before the second and fourth Friday of 
each month. 



EDITORIAL 

Efficiency 

This, the twentieth century, is the age of ef- 
ficiency. We hear the familiar word on every- 



one's tongue in respect to many and various sub- 
jects. The term defined scientifically would be 
as follows : The ratio of useful work to the total 
work done by the acting force. We speak of ef- 
ficient machinery, efficient workmen, efficient 



150 



THE CRUCIBLE 



teachers and we have been wondering whether 
it is not applicable as well to students. 

We do not use inefficient machinery ; inefficient 
workmen are discharged and go without work; 
inefficient teachers are the greatest hindrance and 
evil that can befall a country or nation. Certain- 
ly, the same is true of students and we say that 
inefficient students are the root of all evil, the 
disgrace of public schools and colleges. 

It is by no means a common fault, for in gen- 
eral we have a majority of efficient students. 
Wherever it is the case, it most certainly cannot 
be the fault of the individual student altogether. 
Many times those receiving splendid grades in 
their studies do not attain a normal per cent ef- 
ficiency. 

It is a very common occurrence to hear some 
one remark, "I do not have time to do my refer- 
ence work," or whatever work it may be. We of- 
ten feel as though we were rushed with work, as 
though we cannot do all that we are asked to do, 
or that we should like to do and at the same time 
withhold a few hours of leisure for ourselves. 

But if we would take time to "take account" 
of the way in which we spend each minute of but 
a single day, we would be greatly surprised at 
the per cent of time for which we cannot account 
and which must have been wasted. 

School days, college days, are the most precious 
we shall ever live, so they say, and if that be true, 
is it not but natural that we should want to spend 
them most profitably, most efficietly? 

Earnestness, sincerity, thoroughness and system 
are a few of the keynotes of efficiency. Try them 
and win. 

ONE AT A TIME PLEASE 

A FELLER was 

WHO LOVED a fair lass; 

OFT from afar 

DID HE WATCH her, 

THAT HE might adore 

HER, yet not be seen. 

HIS HEART was softened 

LIKE unto his brain. 

AND SO HE sent her 

A TOKEN OF HIS adoration, 

IN A timely Valentine, 

ONLY TO BE spurned 

AND snubbed 

HARD enough 

TO TAKE his breath. 

NOT TO BE outdone, 



AND LONGING for a mate, 
HE SEIZED upon 
ANOTHER opportunity. 
SO WHEN another 

VALENTINE DAY HAD rolled around, 

HIS FROZEN ARDOR warmed 

AGAIN, he sent twenty, 

TO MAKE SURE of getting one, 

TO AS MANY DAMSELS OF THE SORT he 

wanted. 
NOW, STRANGE to say, 
THEY everyone 
ACCEPTED ; and so, 
TO SAVE BEING sued 
FOR BREACH of promise, 
HE RAN away 
TO UTAH! 

ST. VALENTINE'S DAY 

"Tomorrow is St. Valentine's Day, 
All in the morning betime ; 
And I a maid at your window 
To be your valentine. 

— Shakespeare, Hamlet, IV, 5. 

The fourteenth of February is the date dedicat- 
ed to St, Valentine. On that day in the year 270 
A. D., at the time of the persecutions of the Chris- 
tians under Claudius II, this saint was beheaded 
for professing the Christian faith. Nevertheless, 
the day had its origin long before the Christian 
era. It was customary for Roman youths, during 
the feast of Supercalia, to draw by lot from a 
common receptacle the name of a girl. Each boy 
was then considered, during the next twelve 
months, as the sweetheart of the young lady 
whose name he had drawn. This custom was 
largely brought into practice because birds began 
to mate at that time of the year. 

The church found it impossible to destroy this 
pagan custom and, therefore, legalized it by dedi- 
cating the day to St. Valentine. The custom of 
choosing sweethearts for the year was still con- 
tinued and it is this that has caused the day to be 
so loved by young folks. St. Valentine's Day has 
been chiefly observed in England, France, and 
Scotland. The young people of the United States 
are also joyful devotees at Cupid's shrine on that 
day. From the old choosing of names by lot, the 
practice has grown until youths now send gor- 
geous creations of paper and coloring to the maid- 
ens of their hearts. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



151 



It was customary at one time in certain sec- 
tions of the United States, that to send a valen- 
tine was the same as a sincere declaration of 
love. If the young lady accepted it, the act was 
considered as a consent to an engagement be- 
tween the two. Valentine Day no longer has this 
significance. 

FIT'S HONEST VERDICT 
V. Class at College 

College is sumthin' like school only more so. 
That is we have class. We have different kinds 
of classes, namely on the one hand Freshmen, 
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors which I have 
told you of before, and on the other hand the 
classes where you learn thing's. The classes 
where you learn things are like classes at school 
'ceptin' they aren't no teacher. We have a per- 
fessor in college. Perfessers are much like teach- 
ers 'ceptin' they don't whip nor use other forms 
of capitol punishment. They just scold whitch is 
worse. They tell you the lesson an' then ask you 
what they told as if they forgot it that quick. 
One of 'em asked me oncet, where was Africky. 
I tole him I lurnt that in school an' that unless it 
had been moved it was still at the same place. 
He got all red in the face an' talked like a man 
all het up. Now wasn't that sumthin' fer him 
to lose his head about? 

One of our perfessers had me a lookin' at sum 
microbes through a telescope one day an' after 
that I didn't drink water fer a long time. I took 
t» drinkin' milk, but I finally got over it. I quit 
biology though after seein' that an' because they 
had a skelton of a man in a show case. Sum o' 
the fellers sed it was almost to pieces an' that 
they'd need anothern soon. They kinda hinted 
that I'd make a good example of one an' knowin' 
that college is a sort of a secret society I tole the 
perfesser that I had wreather not take any more 
biology as my English teacher said I need English 
worser. 

He is a mitey good teacher (I mean perfesser, 
I always fergit). He can learn you English as 
good as the next one. He told me I murdered 
English in grand style. I think he meant that. I 
would face deth to say what I think. He's right. 
I'm none o' those kind that believes in sugar coat- 
in'. I'm plane spoken even about college. 

One thing I like about College is you don't have 
to study. When class is out you don't have to 
stay in. At home school we had a fifteen minutes 
recess. Here we have several hours recess every 
day. That's one side of class life that sorta soots 
me. 



Classmates is funny things. They are different 
from roommates. They ain't with you as much 
but they say more while they are with you. They 
laff at what you say in class an' then scold you 
fer sayin' it after class. A feller wunders sum- 
times whitch way they mean it. 

A classmate is a friend as long as you have 
money an' want to buy second hand books but ev- 
er afterwards he bears watchin'. 

I'll tell you next time about wreckreashun. 

DAVID FIT. 

IT ALL DEPENDS ON YOU! 

It matters not how storms may blow and tempests 

rough the sea; 
It matters not if "luck" has flown nor what your 

lot may be ; 

It matters not if fate has placed you far from 
victory — 

It all depends on you! 

It matters not where you were born, of parents 
high or low, 

It matters not if poverty has gripped you from 
the "go"; 

It matters not if nature's whims have made your 
going slow — 

It all depends on you ! 

It matters not what men may think nor yet what 

men may say; 
It matters not if worlds of foes are standing in 

your way; 

It matters not if midnight clouds are clouding out 
the day — 

It all depends on you! 

—RHODES R. STABLEY. 

THE HERMIT OF LONE MOUNTAIN 

Twilight, and the slopes of old Lone Mountain 
were bathed in bluish shadows. From far below 
the tiny lights of Forgetful Valley twinkled like 
so many stars. 

An old man, slowly climbing the rocky trail, 
turned now and then to glance back at those 
lights, as if desiring to partake of the cheer 
they beckoned, yet always with a shake of his 
silvered head, he turned his face to the steep as- 
cent. Finally, gaining the summit, he stopped 
and turned again to look once more at those 
friendly beacons. 

No dwarf was he, but rather an aged oak, upon 



152 



THE CRUCIBLE 



which the storms of time had beaten relentlessly. 
Over his broad shoulders his hair fell in silver rip- 
ples; his face was criss-crossed with the lines of 
time, and his gray eyes beneath bushy eyebrows 
were friendly, and yet over all there seemed to 
be written a vaerue something which betokened 
brooding and suffering. 

Fpr many years the inhabitants of Forgetful 
Vallev had wondered and gossiped concerning 
the old hermit, for after all the Valley, despite 
its name, was inhabited ' by ordinary mortals, 
yet all gossip and every conjecture was so much 
wasted breath, for the hermit never spoke of his 
former life nor of the life he led. As time slowly 
wore on, the valley folk became accustomed to 
him and his ways, and he came to be regarded as 
one of them. 

To the children he was always a source of 
pleasure, because he amused them with his witty 
stories, and astonished them with his grotesque 
antics; to the men he was merely friendly; women 
he avoided, but when he could not avoid them he 
spoke as little as possible. 

As he stood there upon the mountain top he 
was alone and seemed in his loneliness more like 
some giant oak, bowed before the storms of time. 

He gazed for a few minutes at the twinkling 
lights far below, then with a sigh he turned 
and walked slowly to a large flat rock which ov- 
erlooked the valley. This was his favorite haunt 
and here he spent many hours gazing vacantly 
into the valley. With a sigh he sank heavily into 
his seat and settled into a dreamy contemplation 
of the view far below. 

The twilight deepened into the darker shadows 
of night, while from the forest behind him the 
night birds awoke the gloom with their whisper- 
ing and calling, and the sough of the night wind 
lent to the scene an air of peacefulness and rest. 

But the old man heeded none of these things 
of nature, for to him the lights of the valley had 
become the light of the old plantation ; the sigh 
of the night wind, the far-off sound of the banjo, 
and the rustle of the leaves betokened the ap- 
proach of his sweetheart. For he was dreaming 
of a scene beneath the pines of the sunny south, 
. and in his dream he was awaiting the coming of 
his sweetheart. 

A moment of anxiety and waiting — would she 
come? Then he felt two small hands before his 
eyes. With the soft calls of the night as witness- 
es, they once again vowed their love for each 
other. 

These two had grown up together, and as the 
days of love had kindled in their hearts, and as 



these fires had grown, they had finally professed 
their love and had become engaged. 

Yet the victory of love had not been an easy 
one. From early childhood Jim Munro and Len 
Trooper had been friends, and from the earliest 
days of their friendship they had, as all good lov- 
ers do, fought for the hand of the winsome Claire 
Nelson. 

Now Claire, being a tease, as well as a tom-boy, 
had never encouraged either of her youthful lov- 
ers, but as the three passed from youth into the 
mature life she had gradually shown a preference 
for Jim, and naturally the friendship of Jim and 
Len slowly assumed the aspect of open enmity, 
but Claire and Len remained friends. 

One evening, while Len had been called out of 
town to attend to his business interests, Jim called 
upon Claire and before leaving he asked her to 
be his wife. After some slight hesitation, which 
may or may not have been assumed, she gave him 
an affirmative reply and Jim left the house, feel- 
ing as though he were walking in air, amazed and 
elated at his good fortune. 

When Len returned, one of the first bits of gos- 
sip which greeted him was the news that Claire 
and Jim were engaged. He was stunned at the 
news, but that evening he asked permission to 
call, and early in the evening made his way to 
Claire's home. 

He found Claire in the garden cutting roses. 
Taking her by the hand, he led her to an old rustic 
seat, and after a moment or two of silence, he 
asked her whether there was any truth in the 
rumor which he had heard upon his arrival in 
town. When Claire assured him that the rumor 
was true, he sat as one stunned by a heavy blow, 
and seeming to gain control of his feelings, he con- 
gratulated her and wished her every happiness. 

Then as he rose to go and without warning, he 
seized her in his arms and kissed her again and 
again. Taken by surprise, she had no chance to 
offer resistance, and astonished beyond word or 
action, the resistance she offered was futile. 

Was it fate, or was it merely coincidence that 
made Jim decide to call upon his sweetheart 

and fiancee? Be that as it may, as Len seized 
Claire in his arms, Jim entered the garden, un- 
seen by either Claire or Len, and being an average 
mortal, he watched the drama, being enacted, 
with jealous anger. 

Finally Len came to his senses and loosing 
Claire and with no word of apology he strode 
through the garden gate and down the street. 

When Len released her, Claire sank to the 
bench, and before she could collect her senses, 



THE CRUCIBLE 



153 



Jim towered over her crimson with jealous wrath. 
He did not give her a chance to speak, but de- 
nounced her as being false, devoid of honor, and 
a flirt. After bitterly damning all women and 
especially her, he told her that their engagement 
was at an end, that he was forever thru with her. 
Then he turned from her and passed through the 
gate and thus out of her life. 

He walked as a man in a daze to his home, and 
the next week he sold his business interests and 
a few days later disappeared from his home town. 

For years he wandered about the country seek- 
ing to find relief from his mental suffering until 
at last his footsteps guided him into the region 
of Forgetful Valley, and the barren splendor of 
the old Lone Mountain. Here he built himself a 
cabin and waited for his end to come. 

The shadows of night had turned to the misty 
gray haze which betokens the coming dawn ; the 
gentle night wind had given place to the chill, 
cool breezes of morning, and the night birds had 
long since ceased their calling, when the hunters, 
crossing the mountain, saw a still form on the 
flat rock, and when they moved closer to examine 
it they found The Hermit of Lone Mountain, stiff 
and cold in death. 

—"BIRDIE" RENN. 
CLIO 

The followers of Clio decided to forego their 
usual program Friday evening, Jan. 28th because 
of "Hamlet" in Harrisburg. Instead a goodly 
number journeyed to the fair Capitol city and 
were held spellbound for over three hours as they 
listened to the presentation of one of Shakespear's 
plays. Their only regret is that they could not 
persuade all their fellow students to go along. 

Clio's program of the ensuing week had for 
its object the study of art. It is as follows: — 

Debate — Resolved: That the Art of Raphael 
Was Superior to That of Michael Angelo. 

Affirmative, Ethel Lehman. Negative, Mabel 
Miller. 

Violin Solo, Christine Happel 

Discussion of Japanese Paintings, . . .Elsie Brown 
Dissertation on Cortot's Art, Esther Brunner 

KALO 

The Kalos met in regular session the evening of 
Jan. 28th. The program was opened by a paper 
on "Ireland's Reign of Terror" by Jno. Hovis. His 
paper was of unusual interest. In it he presented 
the political and economic situation as it exists 
in Ireland today. 

Mr. D'Addario was the next to take the floor. 



His talk on the most important of "Lebanon Val- 
ley's Current Events" was up to his usual stand- 
ard. He presented the attitude of the students 
in a momentous period such as exam week. 

Mr. Wenner showed his usual talent in ren- 
dering for the society a piano solo. William is 
ever ready to officiate at this grand old instru- 
ment. 

"Home Rule for Santo Domingo" was the next 
paper, prepared and read by Cyrus Sherk. The 
paper showed that "Cy" had acquired mastery 
of his subject and was thus able to handle the 
question intelligently. 

The climax of the program was the "Exam- 
iner" by Howard Hill. This is always a feature 
that the whole Society looks forward to with an- 
ticipation. Howard had some excellent humor, 
fitted for the occasion and presented in true com- 
ical fashion. 

PHILO 

Philo's literary session of Jan. 28th was the 
liveliest that has been held for some time. Every 
man there had something to say. The Chair was 
kept busy acknowledging those who desired the 
floor. Such sessions are the kind that every lit- 
erary society ought to have all the time. They 
promise to continue in Philo. 

One thing that had a great deal to do with 
prompting such general interest was the extem- 
pore speech by Elwood Heiss on "Why I Go Hunt- 
ing in the Woods." His handling of this theme 
was remarkable, and called forth admiration from 
everyone. As a result, in the general remarks at 
the close of the session, the men vied with each 
other in complimenting Elwood on the splendid 
"dear" that he has caught in such poor hunting 
territory. 

The debate of the evening was unusually full 
of interest. The question was Resolved : That the 
Amendment to the Constitution Limiting the House 
of Representatives to Five Hundred Members 
Should be Passed. The affirmative was ably ar- 
gued by "Ted" Hastings and Jay Arnold, while 
the negative was defended in sturdy fashion by 
Myer Herr and Russell Shadel. In the general 
debate that followed most every man had some- 
thing to say on the question. That is the kind 
of stuff that makes for good citizenship. 

Earl Fake ended the program with a paper 
on "The Cause of Hold-up Unionism." He made 
a clear exposition of the subject and thus took 
away a good deal of haziness upon this subject 
from the minds of those who heard him. 



154 



THE CRUCIBLE 



SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 

Thursday evening, Jan. 27, the Scientific So- 
ciety held its second meeting for the first month 
of the new year. It was no small group of repre- 
sentative scientists from out of Lebanon Valley's 
student body that assembled in the Chemistry 
Lecture Room to enjoy the well-prepared pro- 
gram. 

The opening discussion was presented by John 
Snider. His topic was "Specialization." He pro- 
ceeded to show how the various functions of in- 
dustry are being rapidly specialized in all lines 
of work. The advantages accruing from special- 
ization are many. And it is hard to say what the 
next few decades will bring forth. 

"Automatic Methods of Gas Analysis" was the 
subject of the next talk, given by Orin Farrell. 
He made plain to those listening the new elec- 
trical method of analyzing gas mixtures. Here- 
tofore, the only method available was that of 
tedious volumetric analysis. But a method de- 
pending upon the thermal conductivity of gases 
has been perfected by the U. S. Bureau of Stand- 
ards. The thermal conductivity of the gases is 
measured by the heat they carry away from a 
wire bearing an electric current. The resistance 
of the wire varies according to its temperature ; 
its temperature is determined by the thermal con- 
ducting power of the gas mixture surrounding 
the wire. Hence, the only thing necessary is to 
measure the resistance of the wire, which is easily 
accomplished by the Wheatstone Bridge. The 
Bridge can also be made to function automatically 
with no difficulty. 

The concluding number was a paper on "The 
Prophylactic Value of Chlorine, read by Theo. 
VandeSande. He presented figures in regard to 
deaths or lack of deaths by Spanish Influenza 
among the workers in factories where a small 
amount of chlorine is necessarily present in the 
air. The figures seem to be somewhat contra- 
dictory: but perhaps the weight hangs a little in 
favor of chlorine. This may simply be another 
case where a substance is beneficial in moderate 
amounts and poisonous in greater quantities. 

The open discussion was heartily indulged in 
by several of the members. A practical program 
is in store for the next time. Especially will it 
be of interest to the young women, and most 
especially to those of matrimonial prospects either 
near or distant. But it will help everybody. 
Come and be benefitted. 

John Wenner says: A hen is only an egg's 



way of making another egg. 



STUDENTS' EVENING RECITAL 

Tuesday, January 25, the students of the Con- 
servatory of Music and the School of Oratory 
gave their annual recital. Each number was well- 
done and was a credit to their instructors. A 
few new students appeared showing much talent 
and promising splendid Junior and Senior Recitals. 

The program was as follows: 

Ensemble, "Concerts in D Minor" (Finale) 

Mendelssohn 
Miss Emma Witmyer, First Pianoforte 
Miss Sara Moeckel, Second Pianoforte 
Pianoforte, "Impromptu" Reinhold 

Miss Minerva Raab 
Reading, "Out Sleighing With Sophia" 

George Hobart 

Mr. S. Meyer Herr 
Song, "Consider and Hear Me" Harker 

Miss Anna M. Harlan 
Pianoforte, (a) Romance Op. 24, No. 9 Sibelius 
(b) Etude Pathetique Chamenil 
Miss Florence Stark 
Organ (a) "Prelude in B Flat" Bible 
(b) "Voccata" Rogus 
Miss Beulah Swartzbaugh 
Reading, "Angela's Missionary Offering" 

Greenman 

Miss Mae Reeves 
Pianoforte (a) "Scotch Poem" Op. 31, No. 2, 

Mac Donald 

(b) "Arabesque" Leschetizky 
Miss Catherine Engelhardt 
Song, "Fairy Swing Song" De Koven 

Miss Beulah Swartzbaugh 
Reading, "Take My Voice" Elizabeth Price 

Miss Kathryn Kratzert 
Organ, "Processional March" Rogus 

Mr. Donald E. Fields 
Ensemble, "Hebrides Overture (Fingals Case)" 

Mendelssohn 

Misses Engelhardt and Moeckel, 1st Pianoforte 
Misses Swartzbaugh and Engle, 2nd Pianoforte 
January 14, the York Concert Choir gave their 
annual concert in the Orpheum Theatre of York, 
Pa. Dr. U. R. Hershey, director of the Conserva- 
tory of Music of Lebanon Valley College, is its 
able director. This choir is composed of about 
one hundred and fifty of York's most talented 
singers. We can justly be proud of our director, 
for the "York Gazette" says: 

"The audience was held in rapture from the 
first number on the program to the last, by the 
ease with which the director so capably trans- 
posed the chorus from the quiet pathos of Edward 
Elgar's "The Snow" to the sweeping strains of 



THE CRUCIBLE 



155 



the chorus "All Hail, the Noble Victor" from Au- 
ber's "Massaniello." One of Professor Hershey's 
latest compositions, "The Breeze," introduced 
last evening, demonstrated again the fact that 
Professor Hershey's reputation in musical circles 
is well-founded." 

MATHEMATICAL ROUND TABLE 

On Wednesday evening, January 26, the mem- 
bers of the Mathematical Round Table gathered 
once more to consider various aspects of Mathe- 
matics. The first discussion, led by Lester Will- 
iard, was of particular interest to the Physics 
students for in his topic, "The Mathematics of 
Elementary Physics," he brought out clearly the 
important relation existing between the two 
sciences. He showed that the mathematics of 
Physics should be emphasized more. 

"The Development of Algebraic Symbolism" 
was the next topic considered. Miss Kathrin 
Balsbaugh cleared up many a mystery of signs 
and symbols which are usually thoughtlessly 
taken for granted. Her discussion gave that 
added interest which always comes with a more 
complete knowledge of any subject. 

Mr. Elwood Heiss joined that group of scien- 
tists who are groping out into the unknown for 
a new aspect of Algebra — namely, the fourth di- 
mension. This subject held the interest usually 
attendant upon any theory not full developed. 

Each meeting of the Mathematical Round 
Table grows in interest and adds a little to the 
knowledge we have of the illimitable science. 

JUNIATA SUCCUMBS 

Since the last issue of THE CRUCIBLE Leb- 
anon Valley's cage athletes, have met some re- 
verses which have considerably lessened their 
basketball average for the present season. Cap- 
tain Moore continues his unusual caliber of play- 
ing but he and his teammates have not been able 
to overcome four of the strong opponents which 
they have met during the past two weeks. 

In the first game of the two weeks the Blue 
and White passers ran a close race for victory 
with the fast five fro mJuniata College and barely 
succeeded in nosing the mout by one point, the 
final score showing 35 to 34 in Lebanon Valley's 
favor. The quintet from Huntingdon was com- 
posed of men taller than the Blue and White team 
and this advantage was apparent throughout the 
game. However, "Giggs" got loose from his 
guard and caged six goals, while his teammates 
matched his score with another six goals. On the 
other hand the visitors also scored twelve goals 



and had Donaldson been able to toss fouls more 
accurately his team would have triumphed. 
The score and line-up : 



Lebanon Valley 

Cohen 

Stauffer 

Wolf 

Wolfe 

Moore 



Juniata Position 

Engle Forward 
Donaldson Forward 
Griffith Center 
Oiler Guard 
Wolfgang Guard 

Field goals — Moore 6, Engle 3, Donaldson 3, 
Griffith 3, Stauffer 3, Wolfgang 2, Cohen 2, Oiler, 
Wolf. Foul goals — Donaldson, 10 out of 28; 
Moore, 11 out of 18. Referee — White. 

On the week-end following the Juniata game 
the team made a trip to the environs of Phila- 
delphia, meeting the Drexel Institute and Villa- 
nova College quintets. In the former of these 
games the Blue and White rompers were success- 
ful, 35 to 30. They scored the same number 
of points against Villanova, but that team ran up 
42 points and won. 

The Blue and White guards were the stars of 
the Drexel fray, Cohen caging four and "Giggs" 
three baskets. The line-up and score was: 



Lebanon Valley Position 



Wolfe 
Stauffer 
Wolf 
Cohen 

(Homan) 
Moore 



Forward 
Forward 
Center 
Guard 



Drexel 

Weinburger 
Strauble 
Sidwell 
Connell 

(Matier) 
Radcliff 



Villanova 

Sweeney 

Ryan 

Pickett 

Jones 

Lauffhlin 



Guard 

Field goals— Cohen 4 Moore 3, Sidwell 4, Wein- 
burger 3, Strauble 3. Stauffer 2, Wolf 2, Wolfe. 
Foul goals— Moore 11, Sidwell 10. Referee— 
Golver. 

The teams lined up as follows in the Villanova 
srame : 

Lebanon Valley Position 

Wolfe Forward 
Stauffer Forward 
Wolf Center 
Cohen Guard 
Moore Guard 

Field goals— Moore 6, Pickett 6. Wolfe 4, Ryan 
4, Sweeney 4, Cohen 3, Wolf 2, Jones 2, Laugh- 
lin. Foul goals — Moore, 5 out of 12; Ryan, 8 
out of 13. Referee— Lewis. 

Found on the Floor of the English Department: 
I hope that this will find you well ; 

I know it leaves me feeling like H . 

Love from 

"Maggie," 
YORK. 

The money the other fellow has is Capital. Get- 
ting it from him is Labor, 



156 



THE CRUCIBLE 



TREATED ROUGH 



TICKLES 



On their Northern trip our boys were treated 
roughly by their opponents, dropping the three 
games in a row. Susquehanna was the first team 
to scalp the Blue and White. They turned in a 
39 to 30 win. Having tasted of defeat our boys 
seemed to like it and although they played hard 
and fast, they lost the next game to Juniata 37 
to 29 and dropped the final game on the trip to 
State 51 to 12. 

In the first two games, the battle was nip and 
tuck up to the final whistle and each team claim- 
ed it was the fastest and best game played on 
the floor this year. Our team was way off color 
in shoot'ng and here's hoping the boys regain 
their shooting eyes soon. 

The treatment at these three schools was of the 
best and the school spirit evidenced at the three 
institutions was marvelous compared to ours. May 
our students learn a lesson and stand in back of 
their team, win or lose. Let us all get out for 
the Penn game and give the boys a sample of the 
good old L. V. pen and cheering. 

The scores are as follows : 
Susquehanna Position 
Sweeney Forward 
Leidich Forward 
Forward 
Rogawicz Center 
Center 

Raymer Guard 
Sweeley Guard 

Field goals — Sweeney 2, Leidich 1, Rogawicz 
9, Raymer 1, Sweeley 1, Stauffer 4. Moore 4, W. 
Wolf 1. Foul goals — Leidich 11, Moore 12. 



Lebanon Valley 

Stauffer 
W. Wolfe 
H. Homan 
W. Wolf 
Stabley 
Cohen 
Moore 



Juniata Position 

Donelson Forward 
Forward 
Engle Forward 
Griffith Center 
Wolfgang Guard 
Oiler Guard 

Field goals — Donelson 5, Engle 5, Griffith 1, 
Wolfgang 3, Wolfe 4, Moore 5, Cohen 1. Foul 
goals — Donelson 5, Engle 4, Moore 9. 



Lebanon Valley 

Stauffer 

H. Homan 

Wolfe 

Wolf 

Cohen 

Moore 



Penn State Position 

F. Wolfe Forward 
Forward 
Wilson Forward 
Replogle Center 
Killinger Guard 
Haines Guard 

Field goals— F. Wolfe 1, Wilson 6, Replogle 8, 
Killinger 4, Ritner 1,. Wolfe 2, Moore 1. Foul 
goals — F. Wolfe 9, Koehler 3, Moore 6. 



Lebanon Valley 

Stauffer 

H. Homan 

Wolfe 

Wolf 

Cohen 

Moore 



Constantine says that he has no hard feelings 
against the Allies. How much does he want to 
borrow? — Detroit Journal, 

The average man lays down the law to his wife 
and then accepts all her amendments. 

A servant girl and $10,000 disappeared the 
same day from the same house ; the report does 
not state, but it was probably her pay day. 

— North American. 

Customer — "I don't like these photos at all. 
I look like an ape." 

Photographer — "You should have thought of 
that before." 

Father — "Helen, isn't it about time you were 
entertaining the prospect of matrimony. 

Helen — "Not quite, Pa. He doesn't call until 
eight." 

"Pa, what is an advertisement?" 

"An advertisement is the picture of a pretty 
girl eating, wearing, holding or driving something 
somebody wants to sell." 

— Nashville Tennessean. 

"I shall love to share all your trials and trou- 
bles, Jack darling." 

"But Dorothy dear, I have none." 

"No, not now, darling; I mean when we're mar- 
ried." — Passing Show. 

"Ah shuah does pity you," said a colored pugi- 
list to his opponent as they squared off. "Ah was 
bohn with boxin'-gloves on." 

Retorted the other, "Ah reckon you'se goin' to 
die de same way." 

Local Fame 

After an absence of four years, a man went 
back to his old home town. The first four people 
didn't know him, then the next three didn't know 
he was away. — News Herald. 

"Statistics prove that marriage is a preventive 
against suicide," said Mrs. Gabb. 

"Yes," growled Mr. Gabb. "And statistics al- 
so prove that suicide is a preventive against mar- 
riage." 

It used to be thought that clothes made the 
man. Now they break him. — London Opinion. 

"I wouldn't be a fool if I were you." 

"That's the only sensible thing you've said yet. 
If you were I, you surely would not be a fool." 

Professor — "Now, I put the number seven on 
the board. What number immediately comes in- 
to your minds?" 

Class (in unison) — "Eleven." 



THE CRUCIBLE 



15? 



Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Snpplies 
Gnitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Music 
Music Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 

See the New Fall Styles 

in 




The Shoeman 
"The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 

see 

J. S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F*ei, 




Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and porting 
Goods? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E. M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



158 



THE CRUCIBLE 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

1^ For Churches, Colleges, Residences, Theatres, 
Etc. Over three thousand in use. The high- 
est grade instruments. Every organ espec- 
ially designed and built for the place and pur- 
pose for which it is to be used and fully 
guaranteed. Every part made in our own 

factory under personal supervision. Booklets 
and specification on request. 

M. P. MOLLER 



HAGERSTOWN 



MARYLAND 



N. B. — Builder of three manual, electric organ in 
Lebanon Valley College. 



SATISFY YOURSELF 

— EAT — 
Burdan's Ice Cream 

at the 

IDEAL 
RESTAURANT 

The Student's Second Home 

I. H. ROEMIG, Prop. 

LADIES' ROOMS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. R Apple Co 



MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 



120 E. Chestnut Street 



Lancaster, Penna. 



Manufacturers of 



Class and Fraternity Pms 
Rings, Medals, Cups 



Footballs 



Basketballs 



Mak 



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1922, L. V. C. CLASS JEWELRY 



High Grade Chocolates 

Maillard's of New York 
APOLLO and REYMER'S 
Fancy Gift Packages A Specialty 

In 1 /2. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds 

Various High Grade Confections Always Fresh 
The Store with the Candy with the Snap 

SHOTT'S 

127 N. 9th ST. LEBANON, PA. 

«el 27-J 



THE CRUCIBLE 



159 



New^ard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 
Dealers 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Harry Zimmerman, D. D.S. 
DENTAL PARLORS 

72 West Main St. Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them- We Rebuild and Reweid Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
See if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 

2nd * Walnut Streets HARRISBURG, PA. 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

W. R. WALTZ 

BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 

Cakes, Tobacco 
Oysters and Fish in Season 
E. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



160 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Lebanon Hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 

211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Hat Cleaning, Reblocking 

LADIES 9 and GENTLEMEN'S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 

GRAN/TINE 
WALL PLASTER 
COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitine Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders 9 Supplies 

Tiuscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



S TA TIONER Y 

PICTURES FRAMES 
KODAKS FINISHING 

Leather Goods 
Lamps and Shades 

HARPEUS 

' THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON" 



C. G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 
43 No. 9th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE CHARM OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



E J. SNAVELY <£ CO 

Sporting Goods 

Athletic Equipment 
Umbrellas, Trunks 
Hand Luggage, and 
Tra vello rs' Requisites 
MARKET SQUARE 

LEBANON, PA, 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 



ANNVILLE, PA 



Remodeled 
European Plan 



Refurnished 
Rooms $1.50 





Fred Ehrhom, Proprietor 

•Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Ivebaoon, IP a. 



L 

One Price 






And 




s 




The House of Good Values 
769 Cumberland Street, ; 

L/ebcinori JP*£x 




Do You Want 





s 





] l \V M il lot- 

i ANNVILLE, PA f'-f^d* 



W iW RoHleiricl 

Fresh, and Smoked Meats 
1 Poultry, Milk, I Butter 

8 East Maia Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 'M 



L. A. Khun 




And 



Exclusive Shop for Women 

i?' 119 South Eighth Street 

© - ; " Lebanon; pa. ill § . 




Best Baked Products 

You Pay for the Articles. 

Quality and Service Cost You 
Nothing ! 



Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
- Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hqstetter 

217 E> Main Mreet, Annville, Pa, 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



THE 
CRUCIBLE 

FEBRUARY 25, 1921 




Basket Ball Number 

Alumni Edition 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students 9 Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop 9 * 



$1.00 a Week 



WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 



Watch and Diamond 



CLUB 
The P. H. Caplan Co, 



The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 



206 Market Street 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



H. J. COLOVIRAS C. S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS 9 
CARAMELS, ETC 

S WEETLAND 

Light Lunches, I 
Ice Cream and Sodas 

LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
ICENT ICE CREAM PAR- 
LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

331 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa, 



The House of Service and 
SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures* 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville 
National Bank 
Annville, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE i6i 

Both Phones 

Ask for Simon P. FEGAN 



Capital Stock, 
Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, 



$100,000 



- $175,000 



Ask: to see our 

Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 

839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PAo 

Teachers for Schools. Schools for Teachers. 

NATIONAL 
TEACHERS 
AGENCY 

Incorporated 
D. H. COOK, MANAGER 
326-27-28 Perry Building, 1530 Chestnut St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Positions always open 
I have promoted over 15,000 teachers. 
Why no' YOU? (Signed) D. H. COOK 



Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon P. FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 

' Say it with FLOWERS 9 

The Flower Shop 

19 • 21 North Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front <5c Maple Sts Lebanon, Pa. 
Bell Phone 



All- American 

MOYER'S 

Restaurant 

Eighth & Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 




John H. Hull 

The Harley-Davidson Agent 
Forge St Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



i62 THE 

Lebanon Hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 

211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Hat Cleaning, Rebloching 

LADIES' and GENTLEMEN' S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 

GRANITINE 
WALL PLASTER 
COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitine Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders 9 Supplies 

Tiuscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENN 4 . 

STATIONERY 

PICTURES FRAMES 
KODAKS FINISHING 

Leather Goods 
Lamps and Shades 

HARPEL'S 

'THFGIFT STORE OF LEBANON" 



CRUCIBLE 

C. G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 
43 No. 9th Street 
LEBANON, PA. \ 



THE C H ARM OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



E J. SNAVELY & CO 

Sporting Goods 

Athletic Equipment 
Umbrellas, Trunks 
Hand Luggage, and 
Travelers' Requisites 

MARKET SQUARE \ 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



163 



Q 
U 
A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



QUALITY 

BURDAN'S 

ICE 
CREAM 



SERVICE 



S 
E 
R 
V 
I 

C 
E 



£o\tfer ^Prices 

©ur <i>iyttre <§toc^ of COoofens 

Try US for yomr 

NEW SUIT 

finest v^or^n>ansfyip cn>ci 
§rr>artest <§t\jfes 

§am ^CoWer 



^ «»<for, Representing 55roWn«\g» 3^ing at\cl ©o. 




Bakery amadl ^estattaffamli: 

LJglkt LnaifflG]k©s amid 
Hirst Glass Meals 
Newly PttninmSskedl R©©ms 
With. Wwsmtn& Water 

3(ersfte\j s Superior 

ream 



164 

In stock now, and 
Coming through 
Daily. Low shoes 
For young men and 
Women, designed 
By this shop 
Particularly for 



THE CRUCIBLE 

Young Men and Women 
Who Demand Smart Footwear 
Go to the 

WALK- OVER 

226 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa, 



Our colle 
Clientel 
Imported Scot! 

Grain in hea\ 
Stitched model 
Your inspectio 
Invite 



V( 





w 

For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can Now Buy That Hart, Schaffner <Sc Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit or Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary Clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



J 




For Reliable Clothing See 1 

in Bros. 

Tailors and Clothiers I 

812-814 Willow Street, Lehanon, Pa. I 



IS 
th 



le 



:oll e 
entel 
Scotc 




THE 
UCIBU 



hem Volume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, February 25, 1921 No. 9 

odel 



ectio: 
vitec 

_ 

5 



Editor-in-Chief 

ORIN J. FARRELL, '21 

Associates 

OLIVE E. DARLING, '21 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21 
AMMON HAAS, '21 
MIRIAM CASSEL, '22 



Literary 

RHODES R. STABLEY, '22 
MAE REEVES, '23 

MARYAN P. MATUSZAK'24 

ELSIE BROWN '24 

Alumni 

LUCILE SHENK, '23 

Jokes and Exchanges 

HEBER MUTCH, '23 



Athletics 

GUY W. MOORE, '21 
HAROLD LUTZ, '23 
Music 

EMMA WITMEYER, '21 
BEULAH SWARTZBAUGH, '21 

Activities 

GEORGE O. HOHL, '23 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22 
RUTH OYER, '24 



Business Manager 

CARROLL R. DAUGHERTY, '21 

Assistants 

P. RODNEY KREIDER, '22 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23 
GASTON VANDEN BOSCHE, '2 2 
RALPH E. MARTIN '24 
S DONALD EVANS, '24 

Copyist 

ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23 



Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1910, at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

. Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single cop- 
ies, 15c each. 

.This issue of THE CRUCIBLE has been edited 
with the cooperation of the following: — 
J. LESTER APPENZELLAR, '08. 
C G. DOTTER, '09. 
E. H. SMITH, '14. 
T. B. BEATTY, '05. 
ALMA LIGHT, '99. 
MRS. LILLIAN K. SHROYER, '00. 
H. H. SHENK. 



Address all communications to Carroll R. 
Daugherty, Lebanon Valley College Annville, 
Pa Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents anT alumni, and should be in the editor s 
hands before the second and fourth Friday of 
each month. 



THE COLLEGE FAMILY 

In happy metaphor let us speak of the alumni 
and the^tudentsof Lebanon Valley College as 
t £ family of brothers and sisters. The tac- 
iJ g L +hP narents who sow in fertile minds 
^iZ Joi knowledgl and wisdom The stu- 
dent^ are the younger members of the family 
who sheltered from the real issues of life by the 



166 THE CRUCIBLE 



joys of the college home, patiently prepare them- 
selves for the leadership of tomorrow. Having 
left home, the older brothers and sisters, the 
alumni, have entered the greater school of life, 
fondly hoping to climb hand over hand up the 
rounds of the ladder of success. 

While the students sing the songs and main- 
tain the honor of our Alma Mater, the graduate 
goes back in memory to her halls and feels that 
same yearning, kindly feeling which every normal 
person has for the childhood home or for the aged 
mother. For it was the college atmosphere, the 
class room, the library, the contact with our pro- 
fessors that developed our minds and broadened 
our sympathies, thus fitting us for civil duties. 
By our associations in literary hall, in the parlor, 
on the campus or in the gymnasium we were 
helped to mingle as social beings. By no means 
least among the refining influences of our College 
home was that vastly essential, though perhaps 
frequently unconscious power of the Christian re- 
ligion deepening the spiritual life. 

In view of the fact that "Who's Who in Amer- 
ica," as analyzed by the late Chancellor Smith of 
Randolph Maco College, demonstrates that the 
college graduate has nine times as many chances 
for distinguished prominence as has the person 
who is merely a high school graduate, each alum- 
nus should realize his indebtedness to the college. 
While he may maintain that his energy, intellect 
and character are responsible for his attained 
success, he should not fail to give credit to his 
college for helping to polish the latter two of 
these valued jewels. Then, if he has the spirit 
of practical unselfishness, he will try to put at the 
disposal of others the agencies by which he has 
been helped and at the same time will aid in re- 
moving from their paths the obstacles by which 
he was hindered. He who is permeated with 
this, the Lebanon Valley spirit, will constantly 
seek to increase his usefulness in the realm of 
education. 

Surely everyone notes with jov the hopeful 
financial condition of the college, the growing stu- 
dent body, the increasing support of the church. 
All this is prophetic of a great career of unselfish- 
ness. Although dangerously handicanped by lack 
of funds and occasionally by lack of cooperation 
on the part of so-called friends, in fiftv-five years 
of service she has immeasurably helped thou- 
sands. Lovalty prompts these thousands to in- 
quire how they, in turn, can help Lebanon Valley 
College. 

If this family is to measure up to its vast pos- 
sibilities of helpfulness to one another and to the 
college, the faculty, the thousand graduates, the 
former and present students, all should be more 
closely acquainted with one another, as well as 
with the needs of their Alma Mater. 

In many of the cities and counties of Pennsyl- 
vania and of neighboring states, there live larVe 
groups of graduates and former students. We 
would do wisely to imitate the plan used by some 
of the larger colleges and universities, in the form- 
ation in such places of a Lebanon Valley Club, 
under the control and supervision of the Alumni 
Association. Capitalizing upon the drawing pow- 
er of former associations and common interest, 



this club will be the means, not only of keeping 
the busy graduates in touch with his former fel- 
lows but also familiar with the work and needs 
of the college. As advertising media these organ- 
izations would be unexcelled and the members 
would of course use their concerted efforts to send 
to the college the best type of students from the 
various communities. These friendly groups will 
play a large part in creating a friendly feeling 
toward the college, thus paving the way for still 
more adequate financial provision which, in turn, 
among many other blessings, will mean more de- 
partments of instruction, less overburdening of 
professors and thus, a higher standard of colleg- 
iate efficiency. 

" 'Tis a consummation devoutly to be wished." 

Let us catch the spirit of Kipling. 

"It ain't the guns or armament or the funds 

that they can pay, 
But close cooperation that makes them win 
the day; 

It ain't the individual, or the army as a whole, 
But the everlastin' teamwork of every bloom- 
in' soul." 

—I. S. ERNST, '16. 
ALUMNI REUNION AND BANQUET 

There has been for some time a growing de- 
mand on the part of the Alumni of Lebanon Val- 
ley College for a real, live, heartwarming jolli- 
fication in June, 1921. This has caused the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the L. V. C. Alumni to meet 
at various times and determine what can be done 
to meet this demand. 

According to our constitution a banquet shall 
be held every fifth year and on every other year 
a luncheon shall be held. This then is the year 
for our banquet. After having had a sub-com- 
mittee meet with the faculty, it was decided that 
an entire day be given to the alumni for confer- 
ence on subjects which may be mutually helpful 
arid interesting, but more especially to renew the 
friendships and acquaintances of our college davs, 
to lay aside the mental strain of every day life, 
to forget our intellectual aspirations and to be 
again the carefree and happy sons and daughters 

We have arranged for each minute of the day, 
so that not one moment will be wasted. The col- 
lege authorities are doing their part in making 
the entire week the very best we have ever had. 
They are now and have been in communication 
with men of national repute for Baccalaureate 
Day and for the fifty-fourth annual commence- 
ment address, so all will be justified in so arrang- 
ing- their work that they can spend the entire week 
at L. V. mingling with friends both old and new. 

In the forenoon of June the fourteenth at ten-' 
thirty o'clock there will be an Educational Round 
Table Conference at which time questions perti- 
nent to L. V. C. will be discussed pro and con. 
practical and idealistic, all combining to make the 
conference the more interesting and edifying. Our 
graduates are in practically every sphere in life 
and as thev come back to L. V. with ideals and 
ideas which they have received thru years of ex- 
perience, we cannot but anticipate that great good 
will be derived from such a conference. 

At 12 :30 the regular luncheon will be served 



THE CRUCIBLE 



167 



eping 
r fel. 
needs 
rgan- 
nbers 
send 
ri the 
! will 
eling 
• still 
turn, 
3 de- 
? of 
11 eg. 

ed." 

-mds 

win 

lole, 
>om- 



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Ex- 

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iall 

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ear 

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in the college dining room at which time the var- 
ious classes can have their own tables and com- 
mence the various class reunions scheduled from 
1 P. M. to 2 P. M. We know these will be joyous 
times when we together tell of the victories won 
in recitation hall, on the athletic field or banquet 
hall. These class reunions will culminate in a 
grand general reunion from 2 P. M. to 3:30 P. M. 
where all will be free to exchange reminiscences 
and to give vent to the pent up exuberance of 
youth in speech and song. After this time of 
general good feeling there will be a misiness sec- 
tion of the association when the actions of the 
monthly executive committee meetings will be 
read and ideas presented and formulated for the 
next years work, also the election of officers for 
the year 1921 and 1922. 

From 5 P. M. to 6:30 P. M. the various literary 
societies will have open house to welcome Ex-Clio, 
Ex-Kalo and Ex-Philo. We are anticipating an 
especially joyous time in these society reunions. 

With hearts brimful of joy and merriment the 
climax of the day will be the Alumni Banquet to 
be held in the social rooms of the United Breth- 
ren Church. We are very glad to announce that 
sneakers have already been secured for the Ban- 
ouet who are celebrities in their several voca- 
tions, and no one will be disappointed with the 
toasts, music or menu. You are assured of a 
feast of good things. 

We therefore urge all alumni to so arrange their 
program that they will be able to be with us the 
week of June 12, especially Alumni Day, Tues- 
day, June 14, 1921. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Lebanon Valley College is having a very suc- 
cessful year. The student body will be about 
twenty per cent above last year. The faculty 
has been enlarged and greatly strengthened. The 
income from student fees will be about ten thou- 
sand dollars more than last year. The invested 
endowment fund has been greatlv increased. 

Our indebtedness at the end of the year was a 
little over $100,000, but on this about $10,000 was 
recentlv received from the United Enlistment 
Movement. Jf $3,000,000 is collected from the 
United Enlistment Movement, the college will re- 
ceive $128,000, and this will more than cover 
the debt. If the $4,000,000 goal is reached, the 
college will receive $200,000. 

To accommodate our growing student body we 
must enlarge our plant and facilities generally. 
Jn the very near future we will need a men's 
dormitorv, a women's dormitory, a dining hall, 
a much larger gymnasium, a new chapel, an en- 
larged heating plant, several new departments, 
and additional endowment. The amount needed 
for buildings, equipment and for endowment ade- 
quate to produce sufficient funds to meet current 
expenses is $2,000,000, which was the amount 
reported to the Interchurch World Movement a 

year aro. , 

The college has made splendid progress during 
the last two quadrenniums in the number of stu- 
dents, number of graduates, endowment fund, and 
in money raised for general expenses. The total 
amount secured for current expenses m 1911-12 



was $41,000, while in 1919-1920 it was $80,000. 
The amount of endowment in 1911-12 was $57,- 
000, while in 1919-1920 it was $256,854; with 
$185,000 in subscriptions not yet due. The amount 
invested at this date. February 1, 1921 is $291,- 
254.30 par value, with $154,800 subscribed and 
due within twenty months. To this should be 
added two recently-made bequests of $10,000 
each for scholarship purposes. 

The number of students in the freshman class- 
es from 1905 to 1920 respectively is as follows: 
22, 26. 23, 31, 28, 35, 34, 38, 57, 100, 84. 76, 53, 
101, 61, 96. The highest number in the college 
department proper was in the years closing with 
June, 1916 and June, 1917, when the figures 
stood at 283 and 275 respectively. 

The highest total in all departments in 1915-16, 
with 443 enrolled. The graduating classes from 
the colleere department proper since 1870 when 
the first class graduated to 1920 have numbered 
as follows: 3, 1, 7, 4, 8, 2, 4. 6, 7, 12, 12, 15, 
10, 8. 10. 3, 1, 9, 4, 9, 7, 8, 13, 8, 10. 4. 7, 10, 10, 
25, 27, 21, 14, 19, 18, 21, 19, 15, 17, 10, 18, 16, 
25. 21, 27, 27, 51, 48, 43, 43, 42. 

Prior to the nresent administration no colleee 
class ever numbered beyond 27. Including the 
class of 1921. 41V 2 % of all the college graduates 
will have received'their diplomas during the pres- 
ent administration. 

The College stands for a symmetrical develop- 
ment of the entire being; body, mind and soul. 
As a result, the school was recently visited by a 
most gracious revival in which about forty stu- 
dents were converted or publicly renewed their 
covenants with God. 

We are planning to have a fine commencement 
week. June 10 to 16. The Alumni will be given 
a whole dav for their snecial program. We are 
anxious to have at least four hundred of our grad- 
uates, old students, and o^her friends present. 

— G. D. GOSSARD, President. 

GREATER LEBANON VALLEY 

It sh ou id prove he^ful to those who are charjr- 
pd with the responsibility of the management of 
Lebanon Valley College if the alumni and other 
fvie^Hs of the Colleere will through the columns 
of The Crucible, express their views regarding 
its needs, activities and future development. 

For those who have given the subject careful 
f>ou"ht it is no longer necessary to show why 
i-he denominational college is essential to denom- 
inational growth. The increase in the number 
of and enrollment in State Colleges and universi- 
ties did for a time raise a ouestion as to the fu- 
ture of the denominational College. However, it 
is now o-enerally agreed that the aims and pur- 
noses of State institutions of higher education do 
rot and because of their necessarv non-sectarian 
character probably never will include all of the 
important aims and purposes of the denomina- 
tional college. . 

What then are some of the important things to 
Veen in mind as we plan for the future of Lebanon 
VaUev College? 

First we should regard this College as an in- 
tegral part of the United Brethren Church with as 
strong a claim to our care and concern as any 



168 



THE CRUCIBLE 



other department of our denominational work. 
For too long a time many of our people manifested 
no apparent interest in the welfare of the college 
and because of inadequate support it did not serve 
the church as effectively as it might have served 
it. That the ollege has rendered invaluable ser- 
vice to the Church will be admitted by all who 
are familiar with its history. Scores of our lead- 
ing church workers, both ministers and lavmen 
received their training and inspiration for relig- 
ious work at Lebanon Valley College, and now 
that the Church is supporting the College more 
generously, we may expect greater service from 
the College in the future. 

Second, we should plan to increase the College 
Endowment Fund that it may amount to at least 
one million dollars within five years and two mill- 
ion within ten years. If the full amount provided 
for in the United Enlistment Movement is raised, 
Lebanon Valley College will receive two hundred 
thousand dollars from this source. This will en- 
able the College to pay its accumulated debt of 
about one hundred thousand dollars and will 
leave a nice surplus for other needs. The friends 
of the College should exert themselves in favor 
of the United Enlistment Movement that the full 
budget may be raised and the College receive the 
two hundred thousand dollars coming from this 
source. 

Our State Department of Public Instruction will 
probably soon adopt a minimum standard of re- 
quirements for Colleges, which among other things 
will require an endowment of five hundred thou- 
sand dollars and possibly more. The friends of 
Lebanon Valley should see that this endowment is 
raised m advance of the State requirement. 

Third, the salaries of the teachers and pro- 
fessors should be increased. No regular full time 
professor should be paid less than three thousand 
dollars per year. The absence of an adequate 
endowment fund has made it imoossible to pav 
higher salaries in the oast and the low salaries 
that are now paid constitute a most urgent reason 
why the endowment fund should be built up as 
rapidly as possible. Adequate salaries will en- 
able the professors to take advanced courses in 
their respective subjects during the summer vaca- 
tion and many of them will doubtless be glad to 
do this It is certainlv not creditable either to 
the College or to the Church that the professors 
receive a lower salary than that paid to manv 
high school teachers in Pennsylvania. 

Fourth, there should be unity of purpose and 
effort among the friends of the College. Lack of 
unity in the past has at times seriously hampered 
those wko were responsible for the administra- 
tion of the College. It is easy to criticise but if 
one wants to do so it is just as easv to utter words 
of commendation. What the College deserves 
and needs now is commendation. 

— H. H. BAISH, 01 
Head of Bureau, Penna. State 
Teachers' Retirement Fund. 

OBJECTIVES IN COLLEGE EDUCATION 

During the war we all became familiar with 
descriptions of military activities in terms of ob- 
jectives. We read that ''the army attained all 



of its objectives," or "attained its eleven o'clock 
objectives by ten o'clock," or "failed to attain its 
objectives." Practically all military activity was 
dominated by such objectives — predetermined 
goals. 

This same term had been applied to education 
even before the war, but the idea that all educa- 
tional effort should be guided by specific, clearlv 
conceived, and scientifically evaluated objectives 
had, up to that time made little headway. But 
at present this ideal is looming up with such rap- 
idly growing proportions that it gives promise of 
dominating the whole reconstruction movement 
in education. As yet the ideal is little more than 
a poorly defined ambition. It has not greatly 
modified practice. Indeed it is not yet out of its 
swaddling clothes even as theory. But it is destin- 
ed, within the next decade or two, first to find a 
truly scientific methodology, then to express it- 
self in a comprehensive constructive program, and 
then to transform our whole educational system 
from the kindergarten to the university. 

When it shall at last have been awakened from 
its lethergy by the impact of this new order, the 
college of tomorrow will first scrutinize its en- 
trance requirements. Ambitious to turn out the 
most efficient product possible, it will concern it- 
self that those who come to it shall have the best 
preparation for profiting by its training. Since 
its professors no longer lecture in Latin nor give 
readings in Latin text books (as was done three 
hundred years ago), it will no longer satisfy itself 
with prescribing four years of that language. 
Neither will it content itself with prescribing 
blindly certain courses in chemistry, history, and 
mathematics upon which no college courses in any 
way build. It will, instead, make a careful anal- 
ysis of the demands a college must make upon 
its students. It will inquire what reading abil- 
ities, what habits and methods of studv, what 
ideals, what health equipment, what basic' inform- 
ation, what native abilities, successful college 
work demands, and will then prescribe these 
qualities as conditions of entrance, ascertaining 
whether or not candidates possess these' abilities 
by applying the modern standardized tests of 
achievement and of native ability. 

Turning to principles for the guidance of its 
own efforts, the college of tomorrow will next 
survey its field to determine for what aspects of 
life it will attempt to train its students. It will 
study the needs of society and its own resources 
and traditions and, in the light of these, mark 
out for itself a definite educational policy. It 
will no longer hold to the myth that there can be 
some basic "general" education that will strength- 
en one's mental fiber and equip him equally for 
all callings. From this survey it will select the 
lines of vocational and cultural training to which 
it will devote itself and then will confine itself 
strictly to these, resolutely turning to other insti- 
tutions students seeking training along other 
lines. Among the vocations for which liberal 
arts colleges will ordinarilv find themselves fitted 
to train, the chief ones will be hiorh school teach- 
ing and the ministry. Some will add home-making 
and certain phases of business. Only a few will 
find themselves either called upon or fitted to 



THE CRUCIBLE 



169 



train for engineering, agriculture, medicine, dent- 
istry, diplomatic service, and the like. 

Having chosen the fields for which it will seek 
to train men and women, the college of tomorrow 
will next turn to a scientific study of the elements 
of efficiency within these fields. It will ascertain 
in detail what are the types of emergencies that 
confront men in these fields, and it will gather 
into courses the training elements necessary to pre- 
pare in advance adjustments for these emergen- 
cies. If, for example, the college is attempting 
to train homemakers, it will make a sociological 
study of the abilities the efficient homemaker must 
possess — what she must know about children's 
food, about the discipline and instruction of chil- 
dren, about cooking, about ventilation, about the 
selection of clothing, and about the hundred other 
things with which the homemaker must deal — 
and it will then organize into courses the ma- 
terials and processes necessary to develop these 
abilities. And it will do the same sort of thing 
as a basis for the organization of courses for agri- 
culture, for engineering, for high school teaching, 
for the ministry, and for any other vocation. 

Its procedure will be similar in its courses de- 
signed for culture. It will no longer set on the 
puerile principle that any course not vocationally 
useful must be culturally useful, or even that any 
course now known can be culturally useful as a 
whole. It will make a survey of the demands 
of culture, just as it will of the demands of a vo- 
cation. It will make a sociological study of cul- 
tivated people with the purpose of determining 
the elements of training essential to culture. As 
such essentials it will discover, perhaps, grace 
of manner, facility in conversation, appreciation 
of good music, an understanding of the view- 
points of many different classes of men and abil- 
ity to talk with them in terms of their own in- 
terests, and so on. It will then draw up cultural 
courses of which every element is obviously cap- 
able of contributing in the greatest degree to the 
attainment of some one or more of these abilities. 

Thus in every phase of its activity the college 
of tomorrow will guide itself by clearly conceived, 
specific, and scientifically evaluated objectives 
and there will be in it no expenditure of energy, 
however small, that is not consciously and defin- 
itely aligned with one of these objectives. 

It is the big privilege of a private college to 
take the lead in initiating this "tomorrow." Near- 
ly all educational progress has been initiated by 
private enterprise. State institutions must neces- 
sarily await the solidarity of public sentiment, and 
are thereby debarred from pioneer work. The 
jeers of the present, but the homage of the fu- 
ture, await the college that will lead the_way. 
CHARLES C. PETERS, 'G§ 
Ohio Wesleyan, Dept. of Education. 

All graduates of L. V. C. will meet June 14 for 
grand jubilee and renewal of old friendships, 
lans will soon be perfected for this celebration, 
uggestions should be sent at once to the Secre- 
tary. To make the reunion a success, we want 
you to be present. Indications are that the at- 
tendance will reach four hundred. All care will 
be banished on "Alumni Day." The "Fountain 



of Youth" will be found nowhere else for the next 
five years than at L. V. C. on June 14. 

TO GIRL STUDENTS OF TWENTY YEARS AGO 
Norman C. Schlichter, '97 

How fair they look through Memory's eye, 
And eager with emotion toward their goals 
Of life ! Now burst full grandly thru their souls 
Almost in music their ambitions high. 

Sublime indeed the blindness of their youth! 
Their hopes create fair dreams of perfect way; 
All are expectant of love's perfect day, 
These conscious knowers of implicit truth. 

I'd like to meet them all again and hold 
High converse with their innocent hearts, 
And hear the tales of widely variant parts 
They've played, some sad, which best were swift- 
ly told. 

THE TRAINING OF TEACHERS PY NORMAL 
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

The World War has left us in fin unsettled 
state about manv of the commonly a^epted prac- 
tices of life. We have been compelled to reex- 
amine and to reconstruct our thinking and prac- 
tice along many lines. The process of recon- 
struction will go on for manv vears to come. 
Along some lines the World War onW accentuat- 
ed what thinkers had been urging before the war. 
This was especially true in the field of education, 
Before the war leading educators had stressed 
with great vehemence the weaknesses of all phas- 
es of education in this country but with little ef- 
fect, What many saw, if they saw at all, thru 
a glass darkly, they now see face to face. 

The greatest weakness of all is due to our 
failure to seriously attack the problem of train- 
ing- teachers. This weakness applies to the col- 
lege and university as well as to all phases of the 
public school system. T f we are not very careful 
we shall have a bodv of teachers made up of per- 
sons of ordinary or less than ordinarv ability who 
could not make as much money doing anything 
else as they can teaching. Equal pay for ecmal 
work is rapidly making teaching less attractive 
to men. Young men in the colleges and universi- 
ties are avoiding teaching as they would avoid a 
plague. The suggestion of teaching as a life 
work brings a sardonic grin and a protest that 
questions the sanity of one who makes the sug- 
gestion. 

The problem is how to make teaching a pro- 
fession with equal standing and with equal re- 
wards of compensation and honor along with 
other well established professions of law, medi- 
cine, engineering, etc. It is of no avail to say 
that teaching brings its own rewards, for this in 
itself gains no recruits for teaching. Everything 
that is'worth doing brings its own reward. Much 
of the attractiveness that comes from the appeal 
to one's imagination and constructive genius which 
many lines of endeavor make to men, is lacking 
in teaching. Teaching calls for patient, pains- 
taking, and studious efforts that only fine minds 
are capable of. Teaching is in competition with 



170 



THE CRUCIBLE 



industry, commerce and the well established pro- 
fessions and must guarantee equal rewards of 
compensation and social standing if it is to re- 
cruit its share of ability. 

We in this country do less to train teachers 
than any civilized country in the world. We 
ought to accept it as an axiom that every pupil 
m the schools below the high school should have 
a teacher with at least a four year high school 
education plus two years in a normal school, and 
that every pupil in a high school should 
have a teacher with no less than a college course 
beyond the high school. The fact is that not 
more than one-fifth and it may be as low as one- 
sixth of all American public school teachers do 
not have any more education than is represented 
by four vears in a high school plun two years in 
a norma 1 school. The State of Pe ir sylvania has 
thirteen no~mal schools and if all of them were 
crowded to their capacity they could rot be^in 
to sudp 7 v the teachers that are needed for the 
schools below the high school. Pennsylvania 
needs from six to seven thousand new teachers 
each year for her elementary schools, whereas 
the greatest output in any one year from the thir- 
teen normal schools was two thousand teachers. 
Last year the number of graduates was about 
thirteen hundred, and this year it will be about 
seventeen hundred, and this in the year of the 
greatest shortage of teachers. 

The need for trained teachers in the elementary 
grades being so great and the supply from the 
normal schools falling far short of the need, it 
is absurd for anv one to say that the normal 
schools should train high school teachers. If we 
are to have a trained teacher in everv elementary 
school in this state the normal schools have their 
task cut out for them for a number of vears to 
come. This does not say that normal schools 
should not offer three and four year courses in 
addition to two year courses. On the contrary 
the normal schools should offer three and four 
year courses for the training of teachers for the 
schools below the hiorh schools. Anv one familiar 
with the training of teachers knows that two years 
is not enough in which to adequately train teach- 
ers for the elementary grades. Normal schools 
need at least three years for the training of teach- 
ers for t>e elementary grades and they ought not 
to be satisfied until four years training is required 
by state laws for the bie-hest grade of teacher's 
certificate for the elementary grades. 

There will be ro attempt on the' part of the 
normal schools in rMs state to usurp the field of 
the colleges. Dr. Thomas E. Finnagan, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, has clearly de- 
fined the field of the normal schools as that of 
training teasbers for the grades below the high 
school. But if the colleges are to continue to 
hold the fi>ld of training high school teachers 
they must do some reconstructing. Up to this 
time very Jittle serious effort has been made by 
the co^e-es of this state to give high school 
teacher-, a Professional training for their work. 
This str^c rf affairs is largely dun to the certi- 
fication of teachers. The State of Pp^nsylvania 
has required but two hundred hours of pedagogi- 
cal study for the college certificate. The two 



hundred hours has been liberally interpreted so 
that philosophy, logic, general psychology, etc. 
were given credit. It has been possible for col- 
lege students to receive credit for two hundred 
hours in pedagogy and never take any strictly 
education courses. This ought to be changed and 
most likely will be changed by new laws on cer- 
tification of teachers. From one-sixth to one-fifth 
of a four year college course should be devoted 
to the professional preparation of prospective 
teachers. 

In September, 1920, the Normal Schools of 
Pennsylvania inaugurated a two year course of 
training: for elementary teachers that is strictly 
professional throughout. This two year course 
presupposes fifteen units of high school work as 
an admission requirement. This is the most for- 
ward step the Pennsylvania Normal Schools have 
ever taken in the professional training of teachers. 
Too long the work of the normal schools was on 
a high school basis. The new course of study 
requires work on a collegiate basis equivalent in 
its demands upon the students to the first and 
second years of a 4-yr. college course. The normal 
schools of the state are being reorganized on a 
collegiate basis to meet the demands of the new 
course of study. The students' schedules and 
the teachers' schedules are organized on a col- 
legiate basis. Faculties and equipment are being 
strengthened and enlarged. Increased financial 
support from the state is going to make many 
needed improvements possible. Before long Fed- 
eral support will augment State support in the 
training of teachers and the improvement of train- 
ing school facilities. 

The colleges must plan to do no less for the 
training of high school teachers. They must have 
better prepared teachers and greatly increased 
facilities for the training of high school teach- 
ers. The new certification law will no doubt 
make definite requirements in the field of educa- 
tion and psychology as well as in subject-matter 
courses. Figh school teachers need to under- 
stand the fundamental aims and purposes of all 
education. The general principles of teaching 
technioue are essential as well as the special 
methods of the subject-matter they propose to 
teach. Educational measurements both from the 
standpoint of the measurement of the results of 
teaching, is one of the newer phases of education 
that cannot be overlooked. The sociology of the 
American democracy must be understood as a 
necessary background. Colleges must furnish an 
opportunity for observation of skillful teaching. 
Following the dictum that the only way to learn 
to do anything is to do it, the colleges must af- 
ford an opportunity to prospective high school 
teachers to teach under normal conditions in high 
schools adjacent to the colleges. Less training 
than this will not be adequate to the demands 
which the state r*» s a right to ask of those who 
train her citizens. 

— C. H. FISHER, '04 
Principal Bloomsburg State Normal. 

"How do the Joneses like their two-room apart-, 
ment?" 

"Oh, they have no room for complaint." 



THE CRUCIBLE 



171 



DUE NOTICE 

It should not be necessary to be compelled 
each year to issue an appeal in regard to Alumni 
dues, and yet it seems we do forget. 

You will be pleased to know that the L. V. 
Alumni Association has not followed the general 
trend "going up in price, on account of the war" 
with regard to dues, — they are still only $1.00 
per year. 

Your Executive committee has tried to keep L. 
V. C. and her graduates in touch with one another, 
we have partly succeeded, where we have failed 
it was entirely because of lack of funds. If each 
of her alumni had paid the annual small fee of 
$1.00 we could have issued a quarterly and roster 
as we had planned. Will you help us to carry 
forward not only our plans but yours as well? 

Your annual dues are now payable to the Secre- 
tary, 

MRS. LILLIAN K. SHROYER, 
83 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

EDUCATIONAL ROUND TABLE CONFERENCE 

A certain group of men deeply interested in 
the welfare of Lebanon Valley College have long 
felt that there has been lacking a discussion of 
fundamental educational problems at the various 
meetings, official and otherwise, held in the inter- 
est of the College. These meetings may appro- 
priately be thought of under three general heads. 
The first of these are the meetings of the govern- 
ing body which include in addition to the Board 
of Trustees the Executive and Finance Commit- 
tees, the discussions in which bodies are of a busi- 
ness and administrative nature. The members 
are busy men who give their attention to the 
difficult and important problems of finance. 

The second type of meetings are those held by 
the Faculty. In these meetings are discussed the 
problems of detail connected with the manage- 
ment of the College, the records of individual 
students, the government of the student body, the 
courses to be offered and the educational policy 
of the College. 

The third type of meetings are the Alumni 
banquets and other events of a more or less social 
nature in which as a rule there is no distinct pur- 
pose of unifying tendency. 

From this it is evident that there has been no 
organization or even temporary association con- 
nected with the College that has been called to- 
gether to discuss the educational program of the 
College with special reference to its place in the 
larger sphere of usefulness. The only organiza- 
tion fulfilling in part this requirement is the Facul- 
ty as above noted. But the Faculty must of neces- 
sity discuss so many details that its time for con- 
sideration of the larger problems is limited and 
then too, a Faculty is too likely to suffer from 
the illusion of nearness to get the perspective that 
is needed. 

For these reasons it was thought advisable to 
call together the alumni who are engaged in edu- 
cational work into an Educational Round Table 
Conference during Commencement Week. The 
importance of this is the more obvious when we 
call to mind the fact that important as is the 



business management of the college we are never- 
theless dealing with an educational institution. 
Furthermore not only are we engaged in the spe- 
cific work of education but added significance 
to the necessity for discussing the larger and 
broader educational problems arrives out of the 
fact that fully fifty per cent of our graduates are 
themselves teachers. Is it not therefore evident 
that the time has arrived when we should give 
part of our program during Commencement Week 
to the "matching of our best minds" in the dis- 
cussion of the larger and broader problems of ed- 
ucation. 

The president and the Faculty welcome this dis- 
cussion for they very much desire the privilege of 
hearing what those who are engaged in the work 
of teaching may be able to bring in the way of 
suggestions growing out of the richness of their 
experience. They are certain that the alumni will 
enjoy the privilege of rendering this unusual ser- 
vice. 

DISTRESSING NEWS 

ALUMNITIS, an epidemic first observed in 
1920 among the graduates of L. V. ; symptoms, vic- 
tim secretly rehearses college and class yells, fre- 
quently refers to college pranks, finally becomes 
hopelessly youthful: curative, inoculation by Dr. 
Alumni Reunion, Annville, Pa., June 14, 1921. 

ATHLETICS 

In our modern conception of education, its scope 
and its ideal, we are developing a broader, more 
liberal and more utilitarian attitude. Formerly, 
we thought of education merely as the harrow 
that tore up brain cells and rebuilt stronger ones 
in culture, mental refinement and discipline. Men 
secluded themselves, even tormented their bodies, 
for the acquisition of these aims from the Human- 
ities — the flower of races extinct. 

Today, we think no less of this ideal — as an 
ideal — but we have changed our method of ap- 
proach. Daily life teaches us that a man must 
be four-fold instead of one-sided. To be educat- 
ed means now to have developed harmoniously 
and systematically one's four sides; namely, the 
mental, the spiritual, the physical and the social. 

Colleges everywhere are offering systematic 
courses for the furtherance of each of these four 
attributes and are vising with one another in at 
least two of them. The one that offers the best 
opportunity for contest, however, is the physical. 
Organized under this department are various 
o-ames so planned in rule and conduct as to make 
the better man, the better team, the winner. 

Our own institution, our dear Alma Mater, 
stands as a successful participant in these various 
collegiate games. In our baseball season of last. 
Spring we won seven games, tied one and lost 
five. One of the big feats of the season was the 
defeat handed to the University of Pennsylvania. 

Our football season broke even ; i. e. ; we won 
four games and lost four. Of these, Susquehanna 
was plaved on the Island at Harrisburg, Haver- 
ford at Lebanon and the others at their respective 
Institutions. The first two games named were 
our victories as were also the two games with 



172 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Juniata. However, we lost to the Army, Lehigh, 
Penn State and F. & M. 

With the close of the football season, prospects 
looked good for basketball. Our first trip, to the 
South, resulted in two victories and one defeat 
by the narrow margin of 21-20. The next three 
games were won and on the following trip we 
downed Drexel to the tune of 35-30. The sched- 
ule stands as follows: 

^ L. V. C. OPP. 

Dec. 13, Lebanon A. C. at Annville 28 31 
Jan. 6, Blue Ridge at New Windsor 52 20 
Jan. 7, Washington at Chestertown 20 21 
Jan. 8, Gallaudet at Washington, D. C. 41 26 
Jan. 13, Lebanon A. C. at Lebanon 33 27 
Jan. 15, Blue Ridge at Annville 45 24 

Jan. 19, Juniata at Lebanon 35 34 

Jan. 21, Drexel at Philadelphia 35 30 

Jan. 22, Villanova at Villanova 35 42 

Jan. 27, Susquehanna at Selinsgrove 30 39 
Jan. 28, Juniata at Huntingdon 29 37 

Jan. 29, Penn State at State 12 51 

Feb. 4, Univ. of Penn. Jr. Vars. at Leb. 32 30 
Feb. 9, Lafayette at Easton 19 33 

Feb. 12, Moravan at Bethlehem 27 35 

Let us pass from the past to the present. The 
team is in fine shape and we are confident of win- 
ning the rest of the games. Susquehanna and 
Villanova both have strong teams but we know 
we can produce the goods. 

What of our future? The immediate one is 
not so hazy for we have the makings of a splendid 
baseball team. There is a wealth of material so 
that each position promises to have at least sev- 
eral competitors. 

The schedule arranged is a splendid one. On 
it are most of the representative Central Penn- 
sylvania Colleges. There are five home games 
and about twelve games away from home. While 
the schedule is not definitely completed, the games 
thus far arranged are as follows : 

April 9, Lehigh at Bethlehem 

16, Mercersburg at Mercersburg 

21, Juniata at Juniata 

22, Bucknell at Bucknell 

23, Penn State at State 

29, Ursinus at Annville 

30, Pending 

May 7, Bucknell at Annville 

11, Drexel at Drexel 

12, Ursinus at Ursinus 

13, Villinova at Villinova 

14, Dickinson at Annville 

19, Pending 

20, Georgetown at Washington 

21, Gallaudet at Washington 
28, Villinova at Annville 

June 1, Dickinson at Carlisle 

4, Susquehanna at Annville 
Next Tuesday, February 22, there will be a 
meeting at TTarrisburg of the Finance Committee, 
the Executive Committee and the Athletic Council 
for the purpose of laying out definite plans for 
the future control and conduct of Athletics at this 
Institutfor To this meeting are invited all Alum- 
nae and friends who can possibly attend. Thev 
are urged to be present for their Council and ad- 
vise is the thing we are seeking and need. The 



program and plans agreed upon by such a coun- 
cil will be the true representation for us — the 
course which we will follow in our future develop- 
ment. 

In our Athletics, we aim to give our best — in 
our best way. To be sure, we fall short of this 
goal at times even as any man falls short of his 
individual ambitions. However, our goal does 
not consist primarily in winning games. If we 
have fought a good, clean fight, have played fair- 
ly and squarely and then lost — we have won as 
much as we have lost, only in a different way. 
If, then, we can have teams which can win, we 
are winning double victories. If we lose but 
have played as above stated we are still upholding 
a standard. 

Let us bear in mind, then, that our standard 
has a double banner. One of these can always 
remain undaunted even tho the other is lowered — 
tho our aim shall be to keep both beyond the 
reach of our wortfy opponents. 

P. S. WAGNER, '17 

Graduate Manager. 

A MUSICAL RESUME 

This year's musical contributions and abilities, 
from professors to students, has, thus far, been 
quite a success; and indeed, it seems as though we 
are slowly, but surely, drifting away from the 
monotonous routine of study — study — to a more 
social and entertaining programme, which surely 
constitutes an important part of a "real college 
life." 

We not only have our monthly musical enter- 
tainments and recitals, and concerts annually by 
the Men's Glee Club and Girls' Eurydice Club", but 
now we also have a late, up-to-date organization, 
that entertains us every Friday night. "They have 
agreed to call themselves the Men's Convention — 
a title which they well deserve, for they are a 
stipulated "bunch" and they mutually agree to 
Five us weekly, sometimes bi-weekly, a real musi- 
cal concert. Thanks for the Men's Convention! 

T^e head of our musical department this year. 
Professor Urban R. Hershey, is one of real musical 
spirit and enthusiasm. He has given us several 
concerts, assisted by other noted artists, and all 
credit is due him for the rank to which this de- 
nartment has attained. He is assisted by Miss 
Ruth E. Engle, a graduate student of Lebanon 
Vallev College, and Professor Ray P. Campbell, 
who is also our Glee Club director. Another in- 
structor in this department is Miss Lenore Long, 
our vocal teacher, who greeted us with quite a 
reputation aloncr this channel of instruction, 
which, no doubt, has rapidly increased here, for 
she h&s a large number of students in her care 
and is producing nothing but the best. She is 
also the instructor f the Eurydice Club and the 
prospects for their concerts this year far exceeds 
that of previous vcnrs. 

Up until this yerr, the Men's Glee Club has had 
much trouble in selecting a concert programme 
classical as well as popu 7 ar, that would fit everv 
occasion. This year under the directorship of 
Professor Campbell, it wpl be able to give a con- 
cert such as was never before eaualled. The en- 
tire programme is snappy and classical. Several 



THE CRUCIBLE 



173 



sketches staged this year and directed by Pro- 
fessor Beatty are quite unusual for a college glee 
club to offer, and are quite humorous as well as 
dramatic. Its first adventure for the current year 
begins Wednesday, February 23, and it's "going 
south!" . * „ 

In general, our musical "output" and "outlook 
is extraordinary. Our instructors are only of the 
super-quality, and hence, it is this quality which 
we endeavor to present. And so with this aid and 
aim, we are going to raise our musical standing 
"two pegs" and make Lebanon Valley College a 
college of music as well as art, science and lit- 
erature. 

PERSONALS 

On December 27, 1920 at high noon the home 
of Prof, and Mrs. J. E. Lehman, Annville, Pa., 
was the scene of a pretty wedding when their 
daughter, Miss Edith M. Lehman, '13, became the 
wife of Professor Ralph Lincoln Bartlett. Dr. I. 
E. Runk, '99 was the officiating clergyman using 
the double ring ceremony. 

The bride had been a successful high school 
teacher, receiving the degree of Master of Arts 
from the University of Pennsylvania last June. 
Professor Bartlett is an instructor in the Depart- 
ment of Mining Engineering at Lehigh University. 
They are residing at 35 W. Northampton St., 
Bethlehem, Pa. 

Prof. D. Mason Long '16 is teaching English at 
Pennsylvania State College. 

Mr. Reuben W. Williams '17 is engaged in busi- 
ness at Naugautuck, Conn. 

Prof. Charles H. Fisher '04 has been selected 
by the State Department of Education to fill the 
position of Principal of the State Normal School 
at Bloomsburg, Pa. He assumed his duties the 
beginning of the school year, 1920. 

Prof. H. H. Shenk, 1900, delivered an interest- 
ing address on Lincoln before the University Club 
of Harrisburg, on the evening of Lincoln's birth- 
day. 

Prof. Harry H. Charlton, '14, received his Ph.D. 
degree at Yale last June. He is now assistant 
Professor of Biology at the University of Missouri. 

On New Year's day Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Maul- 
fair, of 379 North Ninth St., Lebanon, Pa., an- 
nounced the engagement of their daughter, Miss 
Helena Maulfair, '20, to Mr. Norman Bouder, '19, 
also of Lebanon, Pa. Miss Maulfair is teaching 
English and Public Speaking in high school at 
Dover, Del. Mr. Bouder is a research chemist at 
Edgewood Arsenal, Edgewood, Md. 

Mr. Edward Castetter, '19, is Professor of Biol- 
ogy in the Southern Methodist University at Dall- 
as, Texas. 

Mrs. Mary Kreider Stehman, '99, was quietly 
married to Dr. Oliver G. Longnecker, of Mt. Joy, 
Pa., on January the 20th at five o'clock, at her 
home in Annville, Pa. Dr. I. E. Runk, '99, per- 
formed the ceremony. They will be at home al- 
ter the fifteenth of March at 214 Marietta St., 
Mt. Joy, Pa. 

Miss L. Mae Hoerner, '10, paid a pleasant visit 
to her friends in Annville recently. She has been 
doing splendid work in our girls' School at Moy- 



amba, Africa, and is now enjoying a furlough 
with her parents at Boiling Springs, Pa. 

Rev. D. D. Buddinger, '02, pastor of the Heb- 
ron United Brethren Church, passed away on the 
evening of Feb. 3, after a week's illness. While 
he was conducting his evangelistic services he was 
stricken with pneumonia. Altho he had only 
taken charge of the work at Hebron in October 
he had already done a great work in his charge 
and in the community. Dr. S. E. Euck of Phila- 
delphia, had charge of the funeral services and 
Bishop W. M. Weekly, of Parkesburg, W. Va., 
preached the sermon. 

Miss Lottie M. Spessard, '13, spent the week 
end of Feb. 12 with her friends in Annville, Pa. 
She has resigned her position as Secretary for the 
Y. M. C. A. at Spray, North Carolina, where she 
was employed by the Marshall Fields Co., to enter 
training at Johns Hopkins, March 1. 

Miss Anna E. Kreider, 1900, is President of the 
Woman's Club at Lebanon, Pa. 

Rev. Lester B. Zug, '15, has accepted the pastor- 
ate at Walkerville, Md. 

Mr. Alfred K. Mills, '04, is recovering from a 
serious operation at the Hahnneman Hospital, 
Philadelphia. 

Announcement has come to Professor 1. Bay- 
ard Beatty, '05, who is head of the English De- 
partment of Lebanon Valley College, that he has 
successfully passed the examinations for the de- 
gree of Master of Arts at Columbia University. 

Prof. Beatty came to L. V. C. last year from 
the Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh, 
where he was an instructor in the School of De- 
sign. He has been remarkably successful at his 
Alma Mater. He has changed the "College 
News" into magazine form now called the "Cruci- 
ble" and instituted a course in newspaper and 
magazine writing. He is also conducting a course 
in public speaking at the Y. M. C. A. in Harris- 
burg, Pa. Recently he received his Master's de- 
gree 'from Columbia. This fits him for greater 
service. His Alma Mater will needs look close, 
or she may not be able to hold this son of hers 
who is fast achieving a name for himself. 

Professor Henry E. Snavely, '14, superintendent 
of the public schools of New Castle, Delaware, 
recently addressed the Browning Society of Phila- 
delphia on the subject, "Classes and Masses in 
England After Waterloo." According to recent 
reports, Mr. Snavely is ill at his New Castle home. 
His many friends in this section of the country 
and among Lebanon Valley's great alumni family 
wish him a speedy recovery. 

An engagement of great interest m the alumni 
circle of Lebanon Valley College is that of Mr. 
Paul L. Strickler, '14, a member of the Lebanon 
High School faculty, 'and Miss Lucetta Eckert, 
also of Lebanon. The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Lebanon High School, class of 1913, and the 
prospective groom was Athletic Director at his 
Alma Mater in the winter of 1919-1920. In all 
probability the wedding will take place in June 
of this year. 

We are, indeed, greatly saddened by the death 
of two members of the family of Doctor F. Allen 
Rutherford, '10; the first, that of his wife shortly 
after the new year was ushered in, <snd the other, 



174 



THE CRUCIBLE 



that of his son, Harry Andrews Rutherford, on 
Tuesday, February 8, 1921. Dr. Rutherford has 
a. ways been interested in his Alma Mater and his 
great bereavement and his own ill health are a 
source of great sorrow to his many friends. 

Professor William N. Martin and Mrs. Martin of 
the classes of '18 and '19, respectively, have ar- 
rived safely in Africa, according to verv recent 
dispatches received by relatives and friends here. 
Prof. Martin was well-known here, having served 
as principal of Lebanon Valley Academy follow- 
ing his graduation from the coilege proper. Mrs. 
Martin will be remembered as Miss Grace Sny- 
der, daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. J. F. Snyder 
of Boiling Springs. Both of the young folks were 
very active in every phase of college life and ac- 
tivities and without doubt they will carry the ex- 
cellent spirit which they created at L. V. C. with 
them wherever they go. 

On Jan. 8, 1921 Benjamin P. Parker, '19. and 
his wife, who had formerly been Miss Mae 
Hershey, ex '21, became the happy parents of a 
baby girl named Virginia Dare. "Bennie" re- 
ceived the degree of E. E. from the Universitv of 
Virginia the same year that he graduated from L. 
V. witn a B. S. Fe is now fourth Professor of 
Physics in the University of Pittsburgh. 

CLIO 

Every Clio member and student of Lebanon 
Valley looked forward to the evening of Novem- 
ber the 19th, 1920, with much interest. It was 
the Fiftieth Anniversary of the founding of the 
society and whispers were afloat among the stu- 
dents that the Clionians were preparing an ex- 
ceptional programme. 

So that evening, each pretty girl of Lebanon 
Valley pinned on her pretty bouquet sent by her 
chosen escort, Her chosen escort came as usual 
in his formal attire "just pretending" his collar 
annoyed him because it was stiff. Engle Conser- 
vatory was soon crowded with students and their 
guests. The faint odor of the flowers pervaded 
the Conservatory and we heard whispers and the 
flutter of programmes.. This was all according 
to previous reception occasions, except for an af- 
mosphere of subdued excitement and interest. 

Every one was pleased when Miss Emma Wit- 
meyer took her place at the organ and played the 
Finale of the Fourth Sonata in D Minor by Guil- 
mant. 

Mrs. Heagy, '75, of Steelton, gave the invoca- 
tion, which was immediately followed by an ad- 
dress of welcome, delivered by Miss Ethel Angus, 
the president of Clio. 

There were a few moments of silence. Then 
the curtain rose. Upon the heights of Mount 
Olympus danced forth Terpsichore to welcome 
the dawn. Gracefully she beckoned other god- 
desses, one by one, to join in her worship. Clio, 
Calliope, Melpomeme, Euterpe, Erato, Polyhym- 
nia, Urania, and Thalia answered her summons to 
worship Apollo in a stately dance. 

In the full dawn of the morning each goddess 
took her accustomed place. Clio's scroll gave 
record of the deeds of mortals through the age?, 
and as she read and lamented their forgetfulness 



of the muses, the other goddesses commented sad- 
ly. Then Clio found a record of 

"A small group of mortal maidens fair, 
Whose sparkling eyes revealed intelligence 
Of a rare quality, and on their brows 
A gracious spirit of wisdom seemed to rest, 
Of art and science they disciples were. 
And for the furtherance of these interests 
They joined themselves in mutual fellowship. 
Their purpose was to foster and arouse 
In the fine arts a greater interest. 
And for their inspiration, they avowed 
Allegiance to Athena, virgin goddess, 
Adopted as their own her sacred emblems, 
The owl and olive branch, and named the order 
Clionian." 

At the suggestion of one of the Muses, Clio 
summoned to Mount Olympus the President of 
this order. She appeared in scholastic costume 
which contrasted strongly with the pastel tinted 
robes of the goddesses. It was a pretty tableau. 
Athena, herself, then appeared and sanctioned 
the decisions of the goddesses who had summoned 
the President of Clio, that 

"To earth she also may a message bear 
Of inspiration to her loyal band." 
The masque was concluded with Clio's speech 
to the President of Clio and the goddesses. 
"Fair maid, thou hast implored our aid divine 
To carry forth the work so well begun, 
That in the future, this the worthy band 
May in broad service find development. 
And you, O sister Muses, have approved 
And heartily extolled these lofty aims. 
So, let us therefore pledge our wills 
That while these maids in loyalty abids, 
Unto the Muses, and our blessed arts, 
Our aid divine their efforts shall sustain." 
The curtain fell and every one came back to 
earth and Annville and the Engle Conservatory 
The President of Clio, Ethel Angus, stepped out 
and invited the guests to the reception in the gym- 
nasium. Over our refreshments, we learned that 
Professor Beatty had suggested the writing of the 
masque, that Olive Darling had undertaken and 
artistically accomplished the task, and that Miss 
Adams had transformed the Senior Clionians into 
Muses. We learned also that Clio was Miss Chris- 
tine Happel; Calliope, Miss Mabel Miller; Mel- 
pomeme, Miss Sara Garver; Euterpe, Miss Esther 
Miller; Erato, Miss Beulah Swartzbaugh; Polv- 
hymnia, Miss Mary Shettel ; Urania, Miss Ida Bom- 
berger; Thalia, Miss Mary Bortner, and Terpsich- 
ore, Miss Edith Stager. 

1920-1921 WITH KALO 

The early months of 1920 found old Kalo Hall 
swarming with the seething tides of earnest, am- 
bitious Freshmen, who were eagerly seeking a 
society home for themselves. Old Kalos were kept 
busy instructing and helping these green-crowned 
folk in their seemingly perplexing endeavors. 
Nervously and somewhat impatiently these Old 
Faithfuls watched and waited for, as it were 
their share of the spoils. 

However, these longings were not in vain, for 
the latter months of the old year found the mem- 



THE CRUCIBLE 



175 



bership of Kalo increased immensely ; in fact, even 
beyond the expectations of all. 

With this great addition, Kalo has been steadily 
pushing forward in her literary work. Many 
have been the interesting and instructing pro- 
grams rendered within her noble walls. One 
very enjoyable joint-session was held with Clio. 

As the cold, wintry days passed and the new 
members were initiated into all the rites of the 
society, a keener sense of fellowship automatical- 
ly developed. All have worked in such a perfect 
fashion, that Kalo can boast of standing on solid 
rock, with a future ahead, never before imagined. 

The climax of this success was finally reached 
on February 12 of the New Year, when Kalo en- 
tertained by the student body in the capacity of 
a masked Valentine Party. Many and strange 
were the figures which groped about in dark corn- 
ers, or skipped lightly through the surging crowd. 

However, when the judges, Professor and Mrs. 
Beatty, Professor and Mrs. Gingrich and Doctor 
I. E. Runk, announced that prizes were to be giv- 
en to two of the best costumed ones, the tramps, 
mystics, pumpkins, hoboes, and others came out 
from their hiding places and joined the more 
happy throng. Together they played games, 
composed poetry, and participated in cake-walks, 
etc. At 10 :30, all went to their rooms, complete- 
ly filled with ice-cream and cake, rejoicing over 
the great 1921 Kalo Valentine Party, which has 
now passed into history. 

Affairs like this, good attendance, interest, and 
a combined effort to make Kalo her best, have 
made this, 1920-1921, a never-to-be-forgotten one 
by all Kalos. 

Still, the remainder of the year looms ahead 
just as promising, or, in fact more promising than 
the days which have preceded it. Old Kalos are 
enxiously awaiting the anniversary on April 8, 
1921, when they can meet again with their old 
friends, the alumni, within their hall and when 
new Kalo acquaintances will be made. The re- 
mainder of the year also promises more joint- 
sessions with Clio and also joint-sessions of the 
three societies, such as the one held in the chapel 
on Friday evening, February 11, in which Pro- 
fessor Shenk delivered to the combined societies 
a splendid address on "Pennsylvania and Abraham 
Lincoln." 

The Kalos of 1920-1921 are endeavoring to sur- 
pass all other years. Her aim is to be able to 
say, at the end of the year, that she has done 
her best; that 1920-1921 has been a great year 
toward the upbuilding of the society, and not a 
detriment. . _ 

A SPECIAL PROGRAM HAS BEEN PREPAR- 
ED FOR THE ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES THIS 
YEAR, SO PLAN TO BE THERE IF AT ALL 
POSSIBLE. 

PHILO 

Every ex-Philo will surely want to be in at- 
tendance at the Fifty-fourth Anniversary Exer- 
cises to be held on May 6th. They will represent 
the culmination a fine year's work in the society. 
The standards of the society have been held up 
well this year, not only as regards numbers, but 
also in reference to the quality of the training 



that is afforded every year in old Philo's halls. 
Many of the newcomers among the men students 
chose to cast their lot with those who advance 
under the shield of Old Gold and Blue. The total 

enrollment so far has attained the figure of . 

And there promises to be still further increase. 

The spirit of the good old-time debates has been 
revived. The topics for argument this year have 
all been timely and provocative of earnest, 
thoughtful, ardent discussion not only on the part 
of the chosen quartette of speakers but also on 
the part of the entire membership. There has 
been such interest in General Debate as was not 
known for several years past. The men are re- 
alizing just what old Philo stands for, and just 
how they can make the most of themselves in the 
literary sessions. 

Under the leadership of Messrs. Orville T. Spes- 
sard, Elwood D. Heiss, and Orin J. Farrell the 
society has had a most successful year. There 
will, of course, be three more Presidents ere the 
year draws to a close. But the choice of these 
three future leaders will no small part of the 
task of the society. For among the remaining 
Senior members it will be hard to differentiate 
in the matter of choosing those who are to fill the 
Presidential chair. 

Last October 30th Philo gave her annual Hal- 
loween party as usual — rather should we say NOT 
as usual. That gym was decorated so cleverly 
that it could not fail to fill everyone with the 
spirit of the occasion. And the characteristic pro- 
gram was handled in such a manner by Enter- 
tainer Farrell and his cohorts that many promi- 
nent people of the college were heard to proclaim 
the party the best that L. V. has had for some 
time. 

In like manner the joint session with Clio was 
a real success. And those of Philo hope to meet 
again with the fair Clios some fine Friday night 
in the early spring. 

The Anniversary Program for this year will be 
somewhat different. It has been arranged to 
show just what Philo does in producing all-around 
development of her members. There will be ex- 
hibitions of development and progress that have 
been made by the members in Public Speaking, 
Oratory, Music, Essay, and Discussion. Thus the 
program will show the five sides of Philokosmian 
training. Those chosen to take part in the An- 
niversary Exercises are highly typical examples of 
the progress made by all the members in these 
five fields of endeavor. 

These exercises deserve the attendance of ev- 
ery alumnus of Lebanon Valley. 

Found on Examination Papers 

Francis Bacon wrote "The Little Shepherd of 
Kingdom Come." 

Seneca copied from "Hamlet" and from Kyd's 
"Spanish Tragedy." 

"Esse" is subjunctive case, genetive mood. 

At the Tuesday supper table after the dessert 
has been served, Olive Darling remarked, "These 
pears are rather hard." 

"Yes," answered Erdean Lerew ''they are not 
as soft as "pairs" usually are." 



176 



THE CRUCIBLE 




Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Supplies 
Guitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Music 
Music Books and Bags j 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 

See the New Fall Styles 



in 




BENNETCH 

The Shoeman 
"The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St , Lebanon, Pa, 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 

see 

J* S. Bashore 




Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and porting 
Goods ? We carry a fine line. 

p n*ce Right Quality Right 
E M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 

CLOTHING 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


W 7VY Rohland 

Fresh, and Smoked Meats 
Poultry, Milk, Butter 

3 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


Remodeled Refurnished 
European Plan Rooms $1,50 

Hotel Walton 

Fred Ehrhorn, Proprietor 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Lebanon, 


Miss L. A. Krum 

Jnillinery 

And 

Exclusive Shop for Women 

119 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Harvey L. Seltzer 

f\+* rv n*S/*A f^l A fill Qt* 

Une "nee uoiiiier 

And 

Men's Furnishings 

The House of Good Values 
769 Cumberland Street, 


Fink's Bakery 

Best Baked Products 

You Pay for tlie Articles. 

Quality and Service Cost You 
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Stuidonts 

Do You Want 

Room Furnishings 
Sporting Goods 

Jri W Miller 

ANNVILLE, PA 


Quality Service 

Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hostetter 

217 E. Main Street, Annville, Pa, 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



"The Live Store 



"Always Reliable" 



Everything Is Reduced at the Big 

DOUTRICHS 




DOWN 




All Manhattan Shirts are HALF Price 

All Neckwear is HALF Price 

All Hats and Caps are HALF Price 



$27.75 



All $40.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 

All $45.00 Suits and Jjj^Q 7*5 



Overcoats Reduced to 
All $50.00 Overcoats 



to $33.75 



and Suits Reduced 

All $55.00 Suits and Cl^l^J 7C 

Overcoats Reduced to • / O 

All $60.00 Overcoats 
and Suits Reduced to 



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All $1.00 and $1.25 Silk Hosiery Reduced to 75 cts. 
All 60 ct. Monito Hosiery Reduced to 39 cts. 

DOUTRICHS 

304 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Penna. 



Pre»» of Holrapfel Publisher Compaaj. Cleoaa. Pa 




MARCH 11, 1921 




St. Patrick's Number 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students' Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop" 



$1.00 a Week 

WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 

Watch and Diamond 
CLUB 

The P. H. Caplan Co. 

The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 

206 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



H. J. COLOVIRAS C. S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS, 
CARAMELS, ETC 

SWEETLAND 

Light Lunches, 
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LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
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LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

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Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE CI 

The House of Service and 
SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures* 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa, 

Annville 
National Bank 
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Capital Stock, $100,000 

Surplus and 

Undivided Profits, - - : - $175,000 

Ask to s&& our 

Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 

839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PAo 

Teachers for Schools. Schools for Teachers. 

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I have promoted over 15,000 teachers. 
Why not YOU? {Signed) D. H. COOK 



UCIBLE 177 
Both Phones 

Ask for Simon P. FEGAN 

Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon P. FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 

''Say it with FLOWERS' 

The Flower Shop 

19 • 21 ISorth Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front & Maple Sts Lebanon, Pa. 

Bell Phone 

All- American 

MOYER'S 

Restaurant 

Eighth (S Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 




John H. Hull 

The Hariey-Davidson Agent 
Forge & Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENNA. 




What Is Air Pressure? 

THE air is composed of molecules. They constantly 
bombard you from all sides. A thousand taps by a 
thousand knuckles will close a barn door. The taps 
as a whole constitute a push. So the constant bombardment 
of the air molecules constitutes a push. At sea-level the air 
molecules push against every square inch of you with a 
total pressure of nearly fifteen pounds. 

Pressure, then, is merely a matter of bombarding mole- 
cules. 

When you boil water you make its molecules fly off. 
The water molecules collide with the air molecules. It takes 
a higher temperature to boil water at sea-level than on Pike's 
Peak. Why? Because there are more bombarding molecules 
at sea-level — more pressure. 

Take away all the air pressure and you have a perfect 
vacuum. A perfect vacuum has never been created. In the 
best vacuum obtainable there are still over two billion mole- 
cules of air per cubic centimeter, or about as many as there 
are people on the whole earth. 

Heat a substance in a vacuum and you may discover 
properties not revealed under ordinary pressure. A new 
field for scientific exploration is opened. 

Into this field the Research Laboratories of the General 
Electric Company have penetrated. Thus one of the chem- 
ists in the Research Laboratories studied the disintegration 
of heated metals in highly exhausted bulbs. What happened 
to the glowing filament of a lamp, for example? The glass 
blackened. But why? He discovered that the metal dis- 
tilled in the vacuum depositing on the glass. 

This was research in pure science — research in what 
may be called the chemistry and physics of high vacua. It 
was undertaken to answer a question. It ended in the dis- 
covery of a method of filling lamp bulbs with -an inert gas 
under pressure so that the filament would not evaporate so 
readily. Thus the efficient gas-filled lamp of today grew out 
of a purely scientific inquiry. 

So, unforeseen, practical benefits often result when re- 
search is broadly applied. 




THE CRUCIBLE 



179 



Q 
U 
A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



QUALITY 

BURDAN'S 

ICE 
CREAM 



SERVICE 



S 

E 
R 
V 
I 

c 

E 



£o\tfer ^Prices 

(Dur Entire §toc$ of (jDoolens 
3Cas 3c>een 3Tlar{\ecl £)ov?i\ 

Try U§ for yomr 

NEW SUIT 

finest v^or^mans^ip cn\cl 
Smartest <§t\jfes 

Oam JvoWer 

5*cnfor, 'Representing &roWn«>g> 3^it>g ai><^ *2o. 




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First Ctoss M©safls 
N©wly Ftturimislk©dl ^©©tms 
WStk WummIme Wafer 

3Cersfte^ s (Superior 

ream 



180 


THE CRUCIBLE 




In stock now, and 


Young Men and Women 


Our college 


Coming through 


Who Demand Smart Footwear 


Clientele. 


Daily. Low shoes 


Go to the 


1111 pUI LCU IV^ll 


For young men and 


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Grain in heavy 
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Invited. 






For Reliably Made Clothes 

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Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

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For Reliable Clothing See 




Bros 



Tailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



r 



I I II 



CRUCIBLE 



-v 



Volume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, March 11, 1921 No. 10 



Editor-in-Chief 

ORIN J. FARRELL, '21 

Associates 

OLIVE E. DARLING, '21 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21 
AMMON HAAS, '21 
MIRIAM CASSEL, '22 



Literary 

RHODES R. STABLEY, '22 
MAE REEVES, '23 
MARYAN P. MATUSZAK'24 
ELSIE BROWN '24 

Alumni 

LUCILE SHENK, '23 

Jokes and Exchanges 

HEBER MUTCH, '23 



Athletics 

GUY W. MOORE, '21 
HAROLD LUTZ, '23 
Music 

EMMA WITMEYER, '21 
BEULAH SWARTZBAUGH, '21 

Activities 

GEORGE O. HOHL, '23 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22 
RUTH OYER, '21 



Business Manager 

CARROLL R. DAUGHERTY, '21 

Assistants 

P. RODNEY KREIDER, '22 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23 
GASTON VANDEN BOSCHE, '2 2 
RALPH E. MARTIN '24 
S DONALD EVANS, '24 

Copyist 

ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23 



Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1910, at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single cop- 
ies, 15c each. 



ORIGIN OF SAINT PATRICK'S DAY 

t To the average "man in the street", Saint Pat- 
rick is a legendary being, vaguely associated with 
a serpent exodus from Ireland. But there are 
few historic characters more authentic and few 
whose influence has been more powerful and more 
permanent. When the great Roman Empire be- 
gan to feel the chill of death at its extremities, 



Address all communications to Carroll R. 
Daugherty, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's 
hands before the second and fourth Friday of 
each month. 



and its remotest northern garrison took the first 
backward step in Scotland, there went with the re- 
treating troops, south of the great wall of Severus, 
a youth about fourteen years of age, who, in 396 
A. D., had been born near Dumbarton, on the 
Clyde. The Picts and the Scots, emboldened by 
the withdrawal of the Roman legions, made in- 
cursions into the territory of their foes. On one 
such raid they captured this young man, and sold 



182 



THE CRUCIBLE 



him as a slave, on the opposite coast of Ireland in 
the territory called Dal Araide, to an Ulster Chief- 
tain. This youth whose name was Surcat or Pat- 
rick, as he was later called, was the son of Cal- 
purnius who must have exercised the functions of 
magistrate at Nemhur. For six years Patrick re- 
mained in hard slavery, tending cattle, probably 
on Slemish Mountain in Antrim. He seems to 
have been of an enthusiastic temperament and 
much given to prayer and meditation. Learning 
that there was means of escape, it so filled his 
mind as to give rise to visions, and at least by dint 
of much effort he made his escape to France, be- 
came a monk and Iwed for some time in Saint 
Martins Abbey at Tours and afterwards in the 
monastery of Ler'ns. Here he was moved to un- 
dertake the conversion of the pagan Irish. So af- 
ter eight years of earnest preparation he entered 
upon the work for which he believed himself chos- 
en by God. 

On one of the mounds that crown the Hill of 
Tara stands a statue of Saint Patrick which 
though possessing little value as a work of art, 
recalls a memorable episode. It was on Easter 
morning in the year of 428 A. D., that Saint Pat- 
rick came here to the Court of King Laegaire to 
expound the Christian faith before the Irish sov- 
ereign, his chiefs and courtiers, and the Druid 
priests. The Saint and his assistant missionaries 
are said to have advanced into the royal presence, 
arrayed in white and carrying crosses in their 
hands; and such was the impression produced by 
their appearance and their words that, notwith- 
standing the opposition of the pagan priests, 
Laegaire permitted them to preach the new re- 
ligion through his kingdom. 

His wonderful success from that time on needs 
no eulogium. Suffice it to say that his life and 
labors laid the foundation upon which Ireland 
was presently to stand as the great center of re- 
ligious influence in northern Europe. 

Whether or not his dust reposes in the shadow 
of the cathedral at Downpatrick, under the gran- 
ite slab that bears his name, he is, and ever will 
be, the dominant figure in Ireland — the Keystone 
in the bridge by which men passed from Irish 
Paganism to Christianity. So many new-born 
Irishmen have been named after the great saint, 
that "Pat" has come to be a synonym for almost 
every son of Erin, and youthful Irish-Americans 
are prone to be ashamed of the fact that they 
bear the name of Patrick. They should be proud 
of it. There is no name on earth that in its own 
legitimate meaning is more aristocratic. 

Saint Patrick was a good old man, 
His like we'll no more see, 
At his mere word and kindly look, 
Auld Ireland's snakes did flee. 
The Shamrock is his flower gay, 
High floats his banner green, 
And may the spirit o'Erin's saint 
In Ireland aye be seen. 
A love of our old emerald isle deep within us lies, 
We'll flaunt auld Ireland's ban'r to the very skies. 

—FLORENCE M. SIEFRIED, '24. 



SAINT PATRICK'S RETURN 

Perhaps there is no country in the world richer 
in folk-lore than in Ireland. There is one tale, 
however, which we do not hear much now, but 
which the people of Erin used to love to tell as 
much as any other. This story had been forgot- 
ten until lately, but has once more taken on its 
old charm. 

In the days when Londonderry was only a small 
village, some of the members of the little Catholic 
church caught the spirit of the outside world and 
decided to break away from the faith of their 
country. They would never have thought of such 
a thing had the sainted Father Patrick still been 
living, for he ever had strongly rebuked such 
waywardness. Besides, he had made their re- 
ligion so holy and so beautiful to them they would 
not have wanted to do it. But Londonderry 
church was different now than Saint Patrick was 
there no longer. 

At last, in desperation the folk who remained 
true gathered in their little church one night at 
dusk to plead with the virgin and saints to help 
and guide them in their trouble. One by one the 
men and women, old and young, came in and 
knelt at the feet of their saints, but they always 
lingered a little longer when calling upon Saint 
Patrick for they had entire confidence in him. 

Then a marvelous thing happened — down the 
street in the dusk moved a figure, stately, old and 
holy. Slowly he moved toward the little church 
through the silent and deserted town. As he 
neared the door of the little chapel, he met a 
group of Dissenters but they were busy talking 
and took no notice of him. Then he spoke. "My 
children." They turned for it was that all had 
loved so well. No one but their own Saint Pat- 
rick could have such a voice but now instead of 
being light and joyous, as it had once been, it 
was low and full of sorrow. "Come," he said, 
and they followed with bowed heads into the 
chapel, back to their friends and back to the faith 
of their mother country. 

Then the old father knelt but a moment at the 
feet of the Virgin and those who were near felt 
that it was a prayer of Thanksgiving for the re- 
turned Dissenters. He rose quietly and moved 
away. Darkness had fallen and the people knew 
that once more their Saint Patrick had gone away 
— never to return. 

—MARIE STEISS, '24. 
THE LOST SCRIPT 

On a brisk, wintry morning in the middle of 
February, one might have seen an old gentleman 
walking slowly along a lonely road in the south- 
ern part of the County of Cork in Ireland. He 
wore the garb of one who frequents the wood and 
the rocky hills. His hair was gray, and he walk- 
ed with a halting step showing that he was well- 
advanced in years. At his side he carried a 
leather bag, which seemed to be well-filled with 
some material. The handle of a hammer pro- 
truded from the bag. Occasionally he would 
stoop to examine a pebble or some outcropping 
formation in the rock. This strange personage 
was none other than Professor David M. Porter, 



THE CRUCIBLE 



183 



Sc.D., M.D., the eminent American geologist who 
was carrying on his researches in Ireland. 

For three days he had been working in the vi- 
cinity of Kinsale, a small town in the southern 
part of Cork. As he was walking along the coun- 
try road, he came to the ruins of what must have 
been at one time a church of the ancient style. 
Nothing remained but the stone foundation which 
was also crumbling with age. While examining 
the nature of these stones, he noticed a peculiar 
structure in one part of the wall. A certain stone 
seemed to be cut with mathematical precision, in 
sharp contrast to the surrounding ones which were 
very crudely cut. Taking his hammer, he tapped 
on the one corner of it. The stone loosened itself 
and fell away. It was only about four inches 
thick, fitted edgeways into a rectangular-shaped 
opening. The professor, surprised at his discov- 
ery, reached into the cavity to see if it was empty. 
His hand touched a metal object. Eagerly he 
picked it up and examined it. It was some kind 
of brooch upon which was carved an intricate de- 
sign. Both the clasp and the plate were made of 
solid gold. With interest aroused to the highest 
pitch, the professor with trembling fingers again 
reached into the recess. This time he brought 
out a sharp spear-head, made of beaten copper, 
then several crude drinking horns and other orna- 
ments. They were, undoubtedly, relics of the 
ancient Irish peoples. The last object he found 
was a long cylindrical bundle wrapped in cow- 
hide. Carefully unwrapping the bundle he found 
pver a hundred rods of wood, nearly a quarter of 
an inch thick and two feet long, whose cross sec- 
tions were cut in the form of a pentagon. On 
closer examination he found each of the five edges 
of the rod had small notches cut into it in a rather 
systematic order. The professor was puzzled at 
first. For a moment, he stood, eyebrows wrink- 
led and foot tapping the ground, in deep thought. 
Then he remembered. These sticks had on them 
some story. The notches were the symbols of 
the old Agom script, a form of writing used by the 
Irish during the first six centuries A. D. Perhaps, 
he had stumbled on some important history, or 
facts unknown to the world. 

Forgetting his dignity he grabbed up the re- 
maining trophies, and with a shout started to run 
for the inn, where he was staying. He leaped 
out over boulders, cleared fences as nicely as any 
varsity champ, with his gray hair flying in the 
breeze, and his bag banging wildly about his hips 
and side. Out of breath he arrived at the inn; 
rushed to his room, and dropped exhausted into 
a chair to rest for a moment. After a brief rest, 
he took the cowhide bundle and wrapped it care- 
fully in paper. This he placed in a stout wooden 
box and after nailing it shut securely, he address- 
ed it to James MacDonagh, an old friend of his, 
who was an authority on the Agom script. This 
package he sent to him as soon as possible. 

Then followed months of impatient waiting 
during which the professor half-heartedly pur- 
sued his geological researches. Four months lat- 
er, he received a bulky package from MacDonagh. 
In it he found a brief letter from his friend and 
a manuscript on which he found the translation 
which follows: 



I am Curnan, once a prince in the clan of Air- 
geill, but now a slave in the family of Donmall 
Ma Lachlaim. A wretched position for one of 
such noble parentage as I. Oh, Aine ! What I 
have suffered. Through the treachery of my king 
I am now a slave of the lowest rank — a daertuath. 
But I have had my revenge. Was it not I who 
plunged my keen halberd into his weak flesh and 
in my airy fury, hacked him to bits? How his 
eyes did roll in horror when he recognized me! 
Twas a fit punishment for the injustice he did me 
and his own family. 

These deeds I am recording in the hope that the 
blot on my character be removed, and also that 
due credit be given to one, Patrick by name, who 
came from a country far to the south, and by his 
kind deeds won his way into the hearts of my 
people. 

When yet a youth, I heard much of the splendor 
of our king and his court. My desire to visit him 
grew daily stronger until one day, I prepared for 
the journey. Several young princes of our tribe 
also expressed their desires to go with me. So 
one bright morning, with many a Godspeed, we 
galloped away. At sundown of the fifth day, we 
arrived at the king's castle. We were joyously 
received by the attendants of the court to whom 
our coming had been heralded. We were given 
magnificent quarters in the castle, where, as they 
told us, we were welcome to remain as long as 
we wished. 

Wearied from our long journey, we passed the 
night in deep sleep. At the dawn of the new day 
we were summoned to appear before the king 
himself. Filled with eagerness and yet a dread 
of so important a personage, we approached the 
throne room. When I entered it, I found all the 
rumors about its splendor to be true, the great 
chamber with its massive beams, its walls covered 
with ornaments and weapons of every kind, the 
assemblage of princes, flaiths and priests — all 
were there. The King, Hui Miall, a descendant 
of the ancient clan of the Tuatha de Danann, sat 
on a beautiful throne of carved wood. As we 
walked slowly toward him, I noticed two men in 
priestly garb who sat at his left. These men 
were., no doubt, Flann and Carmac, the far-famed 
Druids who were his constant advisors. At the 
king's right, sat his three daughters, whose beauty 
was so far-famed. My attention was taken at 
once by the one who sat nearest the king. Never 
had I seen a damsel so beautiful. Her hair, like 
waves of beaten gold, fell about her stately shoul- 
ders. Her cheeks were the color of the Irish 
rose, while her eyes seemed reflections of a patch 
of the starry sky on a midsummer night. Her 
bearing was one of grace and dignity, yet tender- 
ness withal. Yea, she was more beautiful than 
proud Medb, Queen of Connaught, and more glor- 
ious than Inisfail the Fair. As we approached, 
her face was lit up with a welcoming smile. Then, 
indeed, was I ready to fall upon my knees and 
worship her. I heard not the welcoming words 
of the king, nor the cheers of the assemblage. 
Even when we left the chamber, I walked as one 
in a dream. My thoughts were of her alone. 

Need I say that 'ere many days had passed, fair 
Rosaleen was my promised bride? We lacked 



184 



THE CRUCIBLE 



only the consent of her father for our marriage. 
But the king had other plans for his daughter. 
Far to the north lived a mighty king who had been 
sending marauding bands into our country to 
plunder and to destroy. This king, Dathi by 
name, although advanced in years, had not yet 
married. It was our king's plan to give Rosaleen 
to him in marriage and in this way unite the two 
kingdoms. 

When I asked for the hand of his daughter in 
marriage, his wrath was terrible to behold. In- 
sults, curses and all manner of abuse he heaped 
upon me while I stood in dumb amazement. When 
Rosaleen rebuked him for his conduct, he brutish- 
ly pushed her aside and she fell against a near-by 
pillar. Crazed by his brutality, I rushed blindly 
at him, threw him to the floor and would have 
killed him at the instant, had not his guards rush- 
ed to his aid and dragged me away. He arose, 
now purple with rage and, in a thundering voice, 
commanded them to cast me into a dungeon until 
the morrow when I should be put to death. In 
soite of my desperate struggles, they carried out 
his command and imprisoned me. 

That night at the risk of her own life, my be- 
loved Rosaleen, dressed in the garb of a servant, 
slipped past the outer p-uard of the prison. I 
saw her creeping stealthily up to the guard of 
my dungeon. When back of him her arm rose. 
A flash of metal and it descended. The guard 
fell, a lifeless heao at her feet. Hastily she un- 
barred the door of the dune-eon, and in a moment 
was inside, and in arms. For a moment we stood 
thus, then fearing detection we started for a olace 
of safety. Through winding corridors and black 
dungeons, she led me until we finally came out 
into the pale moonlight. Reluctantly we parted, 
for we knew not when we should meet again." 
She returned to the castle while I turned in the 
other direction, determined to get as far away 
from the king as possible. 

Then followed days of horror. Kept in con- 
stant dread of the king, whose officers were 
searching for me everywhere, I nearly lost my 
reason. Finally, I came to the territory of a pow- 
erful prince, named Donmall Ma Lachlaim. where 
I acted the part of a slave. Years passed and I 
lost hope of ever seeing Rosaleen again. But I 
was more determined to take vengeance on the 
king. 

One day, a strange shin landed on our shore. 
On it was a man called Patrick, who brought a 
new religion into our land. He tried to convert 
my people to this new faith. Traveling from one 
part of the country to another, he spread hardi- 
ness wherever he went,. Many received him 
gladly and followed him, renouncing the old 
faith. The priests, alarmed at the spreading of 
this new religion, tried to turn the people against 
him. All manners of miracles they performed to 
establish firmly their faith, yet Patrick performed 
as many more marvelous ones. They argued 
with him, but he surpassed them all in wisdom; 
•even Flann and Carmac he surpassed. His fame 
was spread throughout the land. Then we 
learned that he would be at the king's court with- 
in a few days. In company with my master, 
Donmall, and several others, I journeyed to the 



king's city. We found it in a state of excitement. 
Approaching one of the natives, I asked him the 
reason. 

"Know you not," he said, "that the king's 
daughter, Rosaleen, is to be married to Dathi, the 
king of Tir Conail. Our king is waiting until the 
arrival of the foreign priest, whom he wishes to 
perform the ceremony according to the methods 
of his new religion." 

My heart almost stopped within me. Must I 
suffer this added torment? Hiding my emo- 
tions, I asked him if the lady was content to marry 
this man. He glanced furtively about him, then 
said in a low tone. 

"No, her father compels it against her wish. 
Years ago she loved a young prince from the 
south. She would have married him, but the king 
disliked the young man. He cast him into a dun- 
geon and he has not been heard of since then. 
The princess has lost her strength. She is but a 
shadow of her former beauty, never smiles, but is 
constantly seeking her lost prince." 

Overcome with sorrow, I turned away. It was 
then I determined to have my revenge, whatso- 
ever the cost might be. 

The next day, Patrick arrived at the king's 
court. My master had the great fortune of being 
among the first to speak with him. The holiness 
and the great-heartedness of this stranger com- 
pletely won my master. He eagerly accepted the 
new faith and became an ardent follower. Pat- 
rick was soon summoned to the king's chamber 
where, as we know, he would be asked to per- 
form the marriage ceremony. Then the proces- 
sion would start for the church and my love would 
be lost to me forever. 

An immense throng was impatiently waiting 
outside the castle. Time pa'ssed but nothing was 
seen of the king or Patrick. The people began 
to move toward the castle. Then, suddenly, one 
of Patrick's followers rushed from the entrance ; 
soon others followed, shouting excitedly: "To 
arms for revenge ! The king has murdered our 
priest! Let every man who accepted his faith 
now strike for him!" A tremor seemed to pass 
through the entire assemblage. When the full 
significance of the deed dawned upon them, pan- 
demonium was let loose. The air was filled with 
shrieks and groans. Weapons flashed in the sun- 
light. Slowly the Druid followers drew together 
and moved toward the castle to defend the king. 
Then my master with drawn sword leaped to the 
shoulders of his comrades and shouted, "Shall we 
allow the death of our friend to go unavenged? 
Come! Death to the tyrant king!" Like a mighty 
wave, we swept up to the very door, crowding the 
king's guard into the castle. At last, I had my 
opportunity! Madly I fought my way through 
the combatants, slowly, surely I came nearer un- 
til, finallv, bleeding from a dozen wounds, I 
reached the king who was crouching in a corner. 
On his face was an expression of extreme fear and 
terror. When he recognized me the cowardly 
beast fell to his knees and begged for mercy. But 
mercy I had none. He had ruined my life and 
t^at of his daughter; he would ruin no more lives. 
When my fury was spent, Miall had passed into 
Tir-nan-og, the land of the dead. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



185 



Needless to say, my master led his men to vic- 
tory. In a short while the Druid's too were no 
more. Some time later, we learned the reason 
for the death of the noble Patrick. The king had 
asked him to perform the marriage ceremony. 
But Patrick had already learned of her unwilling- 
ness and he refused. The king in a fit of anger 
struck him with his sword and he fell dead. 

At mid-day, the startling news was spread that 
Rosaleen, rather than submit to a forced marriage 
had committed suicide. My last hope was now 
shattered, and I returned sadly to the domain of 
my master. 

But I had my full revenge, and now I await 
the call of the bonshee. When he calls I know 
that I will soon be reunited to my beloved Rosa- 
leen in the land of the Unseen. May the God of 
the noble Patrick speed that day. 

— C. C. SMITH, '24. 

"THE REJUVINATION OF AUNT MARY" 

In accordance with a question of long standing 
the Junior class decided this year to give a play. 
Early in the term they got their heads together, 
and with the advice of Miss Adams they picked 
a play and began to get ready for its presenta- 
tion. For many days thereafter the dining hail 
rang with announcements of "Junior Play Prac- 
tice Tonight." At last the rest of the students 
and many, many others were permitted to witness 
the results of this arduous practice on Thursday, 
February 17, 1921; for that night there was pre- 
sented in the chapel hall by the Class of 1922 a 
thrilling comedy entitled "The Rejuvination of 
Aunt Mary." 

The players selected for the various parts show- 
ed themselves thoroly capable of exhibiting the 
traits of character that were demanded of them in 
their several parts. The leading character was, 
to be sure, that of Aunt Mary, and was played by 
Meta Burbeck. No better person for this part 
could have been chosen. She kept the house in 
a continuous uproar with her quaint ways char- 
acteristic of an elderly spinster from the rural 
districts. The only thing wrong with Aunt Mary 
was that she was "a great believer in speakin' 
when your spoken to." 

The plot of the story centered around Aunt 
Mary's visit to the city with her nephew, a student 
in college had gotten himself into scrapes galore. 
But city life put young blood once more into the 
veins of dear old Aunt Mary, and she had to move 
to the city; for the farm had become too slow 
for her. 

Russel Shadel acquitted himself splendidly in 
the role of Aunt Mary's nephew. He proved him- 
self a good lover in finally winning Betty Burnett, 
a sister of his chum. Ethel Lehman played this 
part, and her acting was enough to make every- 
body fall in love with her and not only her "stage 
lover." 

These were the main characters of the play. 
All the other parts were played in excellent style 
also. We are sorry that the lack of space does 
not permit us to speak of them in detail. The 
Class of '22 has made a name for itself in the. 
presentation of its play. All those who took part 
either off or on the stage are to be highly com- 



mended. The actors were Meta Burbeck, Russel 
Shadel, Ethel Lehman, J. Russel Bowman, J. 
Dwight Daugherty, S. Meyer Herr, Harold Ben- 
der, P. Rodney Kreider, Adam Miller, Josephine 
Stine, Josephine Hershey, Anna Stern and Miriam 
Cassel. 

NORTH HALL ABLAZE 

It was a bitter, biting, cold morning outside — 
not so in the kitchen where the lard in the kettle, 
waiting for the breakfast potatoes, became hotter 
and hotter every minute, until at last in a blazing 
rage, it spilt itself and — caused a slight disturb- 
ance. 

Upstairs, all were peacefully slumbering until 
a suspicious odor, assailing the nostrils of the 
sleepers, finally roused some of the light-sleepers. 
Soon the alarm was given by the ringing of the 
rising bell. Oh, what a confusion when it finally 
became known generally that there was a fire in 
the dorm! Some hastened to secure pocketbooks 
and most valued treasures, while others deliber- 
ately set about packing their suitcases and pre- 
paring for the worst. After some moments of 
anxious waiting, during which faces grew dark 
and lunffs inhaled volumes of smo'ie, it was re- 
ported that the fire was under control. A few 
boards had been torn up in the floo- of the dining 
hall and some plaster of the wall had been torn 
away in order to reach the fire, which had begun 
to creep up inside the wall. But, fortunately, this 
was the entire extent of the damage, save for the 
smoke which seemed to fill every crevice and for 
days left the scent of a peculiar kind of incense. 

OUR FIRST GLEE CLUB TRIP 

Our debut of February 21 was followed by 
quite a successful trip south, two days later, with 
great success in socialistic aims as well as in pre- 
sentations. 

The first concert greeted Shippensburg, where 
our Club had not had the opportunity of a trial 
for years. The place was new, but the faces 
seemed familiar, at least those of the fair sex; for 
it seemed even loner before the scheduled time 
for opening every laddie had his lassie for the 
evening. We all accepted the invitation to Miss 
Oyer's reception at her home and, indeed, we had 
a most delightful time. The "eats" were won- 
derful and those girls — well, ask Nitrauer about 
them for, accordine- to his story, he had the time 
of his life. Yes, it was, as usual, late when we 
retired, but "two" was not too late to prevent us 
from visiting the normal school in the morning. 
Here, for the first time, the faithful quartet be- 
came a nuintet, as Leber assisted with his sweet 
tenor. The girls, as usual, "fell" both for him 
and his voice, and so invited him back again as 
we left for Chambersburg. 

Another prosperous evening in Chambersburg 
was ended by a reception given at the church. 
Most all attended, but about as many deserted the 
place quite earlv as the number of available 
dates were too few for the "many." While walk- 
ing up Main Street, Looer, a member of a trio, 
remarked, "Here come three Janes. Let's pick 
'em up." And before any answer was made, "I'll 



186 



THE CRUCIBLE 



take the one in the middle." Upon drawing clos- 
er, he decided to cancel the idea for "the rouge 
she had on her face was too dark for me." And 
so we left Chambersburg as quietly as we had en- 
tered with greetings from one of our former 
schoolmates, Miss Mildred Rowland, and others 
too. How about it, Frank? 

Indeed, we all seemed afraid to enter Hagers- 
town, for so many people told us of what so often 
happens there. And only the "brave" of the 
Club made dates, "that night for fear of coming 
.back a maimed man. I guess every one is still 
single, but for the night Shadel was married to a 
lamp-post. He told the people, where he stayed, 
that his prospects were those of a late night, so 
when he learned that "she" was only twelve, and 
could not entertain boys, he decided that the 
lamp-post plan was the only resort in order that 
he might fulfill their expectations. This was the 
last concert of the trip and although handicapped 
greatly with the place of performance, the boys 
mutually agreed upon the fact that this was the 
best concert thus far given. 

Our aim always has been "A snappy, classical 
entertainment" and according to reports, we have 
pleased the people well. Several other trips are 
scheduled during April, and we shall expect to 
please the people then as well as we have at prev- 
ious concerts and thus hold Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege in the ranks in which she is entitled to stand. 

THE MINSTREL SHOW 

On Thursday evening, February 24, the students 
and faculty, as well as many townspeople, were 
entertained by a real, first-class minstrel show by 
"Scoody and his Koons." 

The first on the program was a "Krazy Skule 
Act." Armand Miller taught with such efficiency 
that Lebanon Valley is looking forward to him 
as a future professor. Indeed, it is now rumored 
that Miss Adams may lose her position, so well 
did Mr. Miller portray the qualities essential to 
a public-speaking professor. 

The school was composed of quite a variety of 
styles and colors. There was the bashful girl, 
who persistently stuck her finger in her mouth, 
when speaking, and directly opposite, the "vamp", 
attired in a gay. streaming frock, so sweet that 
butterflies nestled calmly on her shoulders. These 
butterflies were quite an amusement for "rastus" 
and "jim", the colored boys, who tried many a 
time to rouse them from their slumbers by slaps 
with their hands. Tony, the Italian, proved him- 
self fit for that grade, by telling so fluently and 
entertainingly of the life of his "old man." 

An old-fashioned Friday afternoon was depict- 
ed to perfection. "Gigs" Moore and "Jakie" 
Wolfersberger, the directors, featured. They 
sang a duet in Pennsylvania Dutch, perfectly un- 
derstood and enjoyed by all. Following this, 
"Gisrs," aroused by his youthful spirits, danced 
until he had blown all the fire out of his pipe. 
Despite the fact that he was handicapped by 
large hip-boots, he performed so well that a cab- 
bage-hp»d was presented to him by someone in 
the audience. 

Between the "Skule Akt" and the minstrel 
proper, Kid Smith and his two assistants, held the 



audience spellbound by his acrobatic stunts. Kid 
Smith's previous work with a carnival enabled 
him to handle the performance in a professional 
manner. 

The Minstrel proper consisted of songs and 
jokes, the songs being accompanied by the piano 
and mandolin. Miss Ruth Harpel, the pianist, 
sang "Oh Mama" so realistic and professional- 
like that even "Scoody" could not sit still. "Scoo- 
dy" entertained by one of his high school dances. 

The entertainment continued in this lively, up- 
to-date manner for several hours, but finally con- 
cluded at 10 o'clock. All are looking forward 
to many more such entertainments by "Scoody" 
for all know that he is capable of even better 
things than the minstrels. 

SCIENTISTS ASSEMBLE 

The Scientific Society met in its regular meet- 
ing Thursday evening, February 25, 1921. The 
first number on the program was an interesting 
discussion by William W. Weiser on "Pumping 
Coal from Mine to Seaport." He told how a 
method is being devised and put into practice by 
which coal can be pumped from Scranton to New 
York. "Dollars and Chemicals" was the subject 
of a paper read by Ralph E. Martin. The rela- 
tionship existing between business men and chem- 
ists in the past were contrasted with the present 
and future relationships owing to the rise of chem- 
ical industries. The next number, "The Theory 
of Relativity," discussed by Professor M. M. Har- 
ing, was extremely interesting. The astounding 
conclusions that can be drawn from Einstein's 
theory in disproof of the other theory of Newton 
were set forth. We are thoroughly convinced 
that if professors, especially those in the Science 
Department, would believe in the "Theory of 
Relationship," there would not be so many "E's" 
and "F's" on their grade sheets. 

UNDERCLASS COEDS IN FIERCE STRUGGLE 

With equal strength they struggled over the 
shining, smooth floor; now jumping and grasping 
for that elusive something under the one basket 
and again pulling and tearing at each other un- 
der the opposite basket. And again, in a mad 
desire to lay their hands on that elusive some- 
thing, the girls raced swiftly, if that is possible, 
from one end of the floor to the other, their mid- 
dy-ties and their hair flying, in one great rush and 
excitement. Thus is described the annual basket- 
ball game between the Sophomore and Freshman 
girls, which was finally won by the Sophomore 
girls by the score of 13 to 7, in regard to their 
appearance. But the description of the individ- 
ual playing would be too lengthy as each one 
played as if the entire game depended on them. 
The female quintet of the Sophomores started off 
with a rush and by dropping a field goal or two 
through the basket and by caging a few field 
goals, had run the score up to 7 to in their favor, 
while the Freshman fair ones were wasting their 
strength and energy in many various attempts to 
cage that elusive sphere, the basketball. But the 
rest between the halves must have wrought good 
with these same Freshman for they came back, 
strengthened by the fast-shooting Miss Kreider, 



THE CRUCIBLE 



187 



and by managing to slip two splendid field goals 
through the basket and by the caging of three 
foul buckets by Miss Kreider, who now took this 
burden of the game upon her shoulders, mounted 
as high as the 7-mark. But all the while, the 
speedy Sophomores were slowly tossing them in 
and Miss Fencil contributed greatly to the ad- 
vancement of the Soph's score by her foul and 
field shooting. But as aforesaid, each one played 
her best and the result was one of the most ex- 
citing and most loudly cheered games of the sea- 
son. The lineup war: 

Sophomores Position Freshmen 

Gingrich Forward Siefried 

Smith Forward Steiss 

Fencil Centre Strickler 

Long Guard Yinger 

Kratzert Guard Harpel 

Substitutions — Morrow for Smith, Herr for 
Kratzert, Kreider for Seifried, Maier for Harpel. 
Field goals — Gingrich, Smith, Fencil 2; Steiss, 
Kreider. Foul goals — Smith, Fencil, 4; Kreider, 
3. Referee Hollinger. 

NORTH CONQUERS SOUTH 

North Hall fought valiantly for the honors be- 
stowed upon her in the game, staged on the Alum- 
ni Gymnasium floor, with South Hall, the game 
losers. It was played on Monday evening, Feb- 
ruary 28, and the spirit displayed by the members 
of both teams was admirable. It would be hard 
to decide which girls starred for either team, but 
without a doubt Miss Florence Seifried and Miss 
Mildred Kreider played excellently and Misses 
Mary Yinger, Kathryn Kratzert and Laura Strick- 
ler were invaluable to North Hall. For South 
Hall, Misses Sara Garver and Josephine Hershey 
played well and Misses Josephine Stine, Ethel 
Hartz and Marie Steiss took up the stand against 
the onrush of their opponents with fitting zeal. 
Very seldom in the games played on the gym- 
nasium floor had such spirit been shown by the 
"uninterested" onlookers as was displayed by the 
"rooters" for North and South Halls. The Val- 
iant sons of L. V. C, whose "Ladyes Faire" re- 
side in South Hall were out in all their glory and 
many a rousing shout and cheer arose from their 
lusty throats. But all in vain, for the sturdy 
"Pistagonists" of North Hall cheered their lassies 
on to unforgettable victory. 

After the final whistle was blown, the score 
stood 13-6. South Hall retired to an evening of 
delight even if North Hall held the cup. A party 
struck the final chord for the evening's entertain- 
ment, where a very enjoyable time was spent. 
The money received for admission was the trophy 
of the winners and after the coach was remun- 
erated, a goodly sum remained. Of course the 
North Hall girls had a party to celebrate their 
victory and many hearts were light over North 
Hall's triumph. 

BASKETBALL SEASON ENDS SUCCESSFULLY 

If to win ten out of eighteen games or to score 
59 points against the opponents' 568 is a success, 
then Lebanon Valley College has had a success- 
ful basketball season for those were the feats ac- 
complished by Captain Moore's cagemen during 



the past season, which now enters the athletic an- 
nals of Lebanon Valley College as history. This 
number of victories does not include two games 
won from the Annville Big Five, nor are the points 
scored in those two games included in the above 
totals. 

Three clean-cut victories closed the season and 
gave the Blue and White passers the slight edge 
in the win column. On Friday, Feb. 18, the Sus- 
quehanna fell victim to Moore's clever basketwork 
in the Y. M. C. A. gymnasium, the following night 
Villanova was trampled upon without unusual 
difficulty in the college cage at Annville, and on 
Feb. 6 the last game of the year was made the 
final triumph when Moravian was finished after 
a close but listless fray. Each one of these teams 
had vanquished the Lebanon Valley tossers on 
their home floors and the return games afforded 
a chance to even up; needless to say, Moore's men 
seized the opportunity. 

As usual Captain "Giggs" was the chief offend- 
er in the 40-30 victory over Susquehanna, for be- 
sides accounting for 27 of our points, he guarded 
his opponent, Leidick, formerly of Lebanon Val- 
ley, so well that Leidick's best effort netted only 
two baskets. The lineup : 

Susquehanna Position Leb anon Valley 

Sweeney Forward Cohen 

Leidick Forward Wolfe 

Rogowicz Center Wolf 

Sweeley Guard Homan 

Raymer Guard Moore 

Substitutions — Benner for Sweeley. Field 
eroals — Moore 6, Leidick 2, Rogowicz 2, Wolfe 2, 
Wolf 2, Sweeney, Raymer, Beener, Cohen, Homan. 
Foul goals — Leidick, 16 out of 27; Moore, 15 out 
of 27. Referee — White. 

In the next set-to Villanova was a compara- 
tively easy victim, the score at the final whistle 
being 41 to 29. The line-up: 



Villanova 

Sweeney 

Gray 

Pickett 

Ryan 

Laughlin 



Position 

Forward 

Forward 

Center 

Guard 

Guard 



Lebanon Valley 

Stauffer 

Cohen 

Wolf 

Homan 

Moore 



Subsitutions — Jones for Gray, Conway for Pick- 
ett, Gray for Ryan, Pickett for Conway; Wolfe 
for Stauffer, Stauffer for Cohen. Field goals — 
Moore 6, Cohen 3, Wolf 3, Homan 3, Sweeney 2, 
Pickett 2, Laughlin 2, Gray, Ryan, Conway, Wolfe. 
Foul goals — Ryan, 10 out of 15; Laughlin, 1 out 
of 3; Moore, 6 out of 18; Wolfe, 3 out of 10. 
Referee — Saul. 

The Lebanon' Y. M. C. A. gymnasium was the 
scene of the final contest, in which the Blue and 
White vanquished Moravin 37 to 27. The lineup: 



Moravin 

Rice 

Neitzel 

Turner 

Heller 

Home 



Position 

Forward 

Forward 

Center 

Guard 

Guard 



Lebanon Valley 

Cohen 

Wolfe 

Wolf 

Homan 

Moore 



Substitutions — Helmick for Neitzel ; Stauffer 
for Wolfe. Field goals — Moore 4, Turner 3, 



188 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Cohen 3, Wolf 3, Heller, Helmick, Wolfe. Foul 
goals — Rice, 15 out of 23; Turner, 2 out of 6; 
Moore, 15 out of 32. Referee — White. 

To Captain Moore belongs much of the credit 
for the success of the team. It was he who took 
the team in charge after the resignation of Coach 
Hobey Light, which came early in the season, and 
he, with the co-operation of a loyal tribe of cage- 
men, developed the passing and shooting work of 
the quintet. Besides leading his team as its cap- 
tain and coach "Giggs" set a remarkable record 
for field goals. He played full time in every one 
of the eighteen games and made an average of 
five field baskets for the eighteen. His highest 
scoring in a single game was ten field goals. Cap- 
tain Moore also did the foul shooting for the team 
and in this too performed quite satisfactorily. 

Teamwork is always necessary for success and 
Captain Moore had that essential teamwork. 
Cohen, Wolf, Homan, Stauffer and Wolfe stuck 
to him ird to their Alma Mater loyally and ren- 
dered ab^e aid in the ten victories, to say nothing 
of the splendid fight which they put up in the face 
of defeat. 

Lebanon Valley now inscribes in her history 
another successful basketball season, while she 
looks forward to the coming baseball season with 
"great expectations." 

ALUMNI NOTES 

S. Huber Heintzelman, '16 has resigned his po- 
sition as industrial secretary of the Y. M. C. A. at 
Peoria, 111., and on March 20 will enter the retail 
shoe business with his father at Chambersburg, 
Pa. After his graduation from Lebanon Valley 
Mr. Heintzelman entered Y. M. C. A. work at 
Laurel, Miss., but left it to enter the army. He 
was commissioned a second lieutenant and served 
twenty-seven months in the army, one year of 
which time was spent in France with the 39th 
division. 

THE STOLEN TREASURE 

On that island where wit is a birthright; 
In the land of the fair plains of Sharon, 
Where grows that rare flower called Shamrock, 
There once lived a radiant maiden. 
She was as fair as the flowers of springtime, 
And was loved and blessed by her kinsmen. 
One day when the roses had faded, 
And Earth, by her blanket was covered, 
Then gathered each noble his kinsmen 
And prepared, for a day, to make merry. 
To be merry on good old Saint Patrick's, 
Once more to bnng laud to his memory. 
They assembled at dawn in great numbers 
And paid homare to the shrine of the virgin. 
Then returned to the beckoning fireside, 
Wher^ r**e newlv-cut elm still simmered. 
Here gathered t< e maid and her suitor, 
The stalwart, the young, and the aged. 
Thev ate ard they drank in their glory, 
And qimffed wine to the queen of the dancers. 
Every poul that was present made merry 
And a 11 r'ay, they revelled in luxury. 
Night foil made no end to their madness, 
But f( and a half moon o'er the fireside. 
Here, they blew curling smoke to the ceiling, 



While their joking and laughter resounded. 

Every hero had chosen his maiden, 

The one who to him was the fairest. 

But among them remained a blithe damsel, 

Who was a model of grace and of beauty. 

This maiden, in modest perplexity, 

Had yet failed to make a selection. 

For two gallant suitors had yielded 

To the wily contrivance of Cupid. 

Now the damsel in judgment had faltered, 

So this was a cause of dissension. 

Each suitor appealed to his kinsmen, 

Who in wrath began then to wrangle. 

Into factions the guests were divided, 

Each swearing to outwit the other. 

Each cursing from minds madly heated, 

Disorder gave way unto violence 

And then displayed cues and daggers. 

Each side stood prepared with steels glistening, 

For by these they would settle the question. 

Dread silence then reigned through the company, 

As the leader now stood with hand lifted. 

Open flung the door of the hallway 

And in stepped the lord of the Northmen. 

United, the sword points of the wranglers, 

Demanded the cause of his entrance ; 

In silence the Northman then beckoned, 

To bis knights who stood by the doorway. 

The struggle that followed was deadly 

And blood flowed from motionless heroes. 

The hosts of the Northmen overcame them, 

And carried away that fair maiden; 

T^at maiden of radiant beauty, 

Who once roamed the plains of gay Sharon, 

Who gathered the roses called Shamrock, 

That maiden whose name remains sacred. 

Thev made her to dwell with the stranger 

And she never returned to her homeland, 

Though her kinsmen have sought her with ardour. 

Yet the blood-stains that speckle the hallway 

Shall always remain a reminder 

Of the cause of that bloody intrusion. 

— M. L. SW ANGER, '24. 

JOKES 

Man of Few Words 

"What did Hogan say when Kelly called him 
a liar?" 

"Nothin' much." 

'That's funny. Hogan used to be a hot-tem- 
pered guy." 

"Well, he never said a word, except 'Have ye 
had enough yet?' " 

"That fellow ye've had working for yer arsked 
me for a job this mornin'. Was he steady, 
Ryan?" 

"He sure was. If he'd 'a' been any steadier, 
he'd 'a' been motionless." 

There was a man who owned a clock 

Whose name was John B. Mears. 

And every day he wound that clock 

For five and forty years. 

But when, at last, he found that clock 

An eight-day clock to be ; 

A madder man than John B. Mears, 

You would not care to see. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



189 



Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Supplies 
Guitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Music 
Music Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 



738 Cumberland St., 



Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 

See the New Fall Styles 

in 




The Shoeman 
•'The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For S\A/ell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 

see 

J* S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F^o. 




Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and porting 
Goods ? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E. M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



190 THE 

Lebanon Hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 
211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Hat Cleaning, Rebloching 

LADIES' and GENTLEMEN'S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 

GRANITINE 
WALL PLASTER 

COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitine Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders' Supplies 

Truscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENNA. 

STATIONERY 

PICTURES FRA M E5 
KOD A KS FINISHING 

Leather Goods 
Lamps and Shades 

HARPEL'S 

"YHFGIFT STORE OF LEBANON" 



CRUCIBLE 

C. G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 

43 No. 9th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE C*AR*\ OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



E J. SNAVELY <$ CO 

Sporting Goods 

Athletic Equipment 
Umbrellas, Trunks 
Hand Luggage, and 
Travelers' Requisites 
MARKET SQUARE 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



191 



Newgard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 
Dealers 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Harry Zimmerman, D. D.S. 
DENTAL PARLORS 

72 West Main St. Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them-- We Rebuild and Reweid Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
See if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 

2nd Walnut Streets HARRISBURG, PA. 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

W. R. WALTZ 

BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 

Cakes, Tobacco 
Oysters and Fish in Season 
E. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



190 



'THE CRUCIBLE 



THE 

CRYSTAL 

R staurant 

C. D. Papachristos 
John Boutselis 

OPPOSITE PENNSYLVANIA 
RAILROAD STATION 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sport 

Kodaks Toys 
Bicycles Guns 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 
205 MARKET STREET 

Harrisburg, Penna. 
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Furnishings 

KIN PORTS 

Annville, Pa 

Students' Discount 

Packard and American Lady 
SHOES 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



SPALDING 




Athletic 

Equipment 

For 

Every 

Indoor 

And 

Outdoor 

Sport 



BASKET BALL, BOXING 
GYMNASIUM CLOTHING 
ICE SKATES AND SHOES 

Send for Catalogue 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
126 Nassau St. N. Y. 



CLOTHING 

FOR 

Well Dressed 
MEN 

McFall & Son 

Third St Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 

CLOTHING 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


WI 7V\ Rohland 

! Fresh and Smoked Meats 
Poultry, Milk, Butter 

3 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


Remodeled Refurnished 
European Plan Rooms $1.50 

Hotel waiton 

Fred Ehrhorn, Proprietor 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Lebanon, 


Miss L. A. Krum 

luiiiinery 

And 

Exclusive Shop for Women 

119 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Harvey L Seltzer 

uuc riitc LIU unci 

And 

Men's Furnishings 

The House of Good Values 
769 Cumberland Street, 

Lebanon F^sl 


Fink's Bakery 

Best Baked Products 

Yon Pay for the Articles. 

Quality and Service Oost You 
Nothing ! 


Students 

Do You Want 

Room Furnishings 
Sporting Goods 

H VV^ Miller 

ANNVILLE, PA 


Quality Service 

Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hostetter 

217 E. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



"The Live Store" "Always Reliable" 
Everything Is Reduced at the Big 

DOUTRICHS 




DOWN 





All Manhattan Shirts are HALF Price 

All Neckwear is HALF Price 

All Hats and Caps are HALF Price 



All $40.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 

All $45.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 



$27.75 
$29.75 

All $50.00 Overcoats Jjj^^ 75 

$37.75 



and Suits Reduced to 

All $55.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 



All $60.00 Overcoats A\ ^TGZ 
and Suits Reduced to * O 

All $1.00 and $1.25 Silk Hosiery Reduced to 75 cts. 
All 60 ct. Monito Hosiery Reduced to 39 cts. 



DOUTRICHS 

304 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pentia. 



Press of Heliapfel Publishing Company. Cleona, Pa 



Mr. II. L. Swaager 

Lebanon Valley College 




Sophomore Number 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students 9 Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop 9 * 



$1.00 a Week 

WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 

Watch and Diamond 
CLUB 

The P. H. Caplan Co. 

The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 

206 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



H. J. COLOVIRAS C. S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS, 
CARAMELS, ETC 

SWEETLAND 

Light Lunches, 
Ice Cream and Sodas 

LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
ICENT ICE CREAM PAR- 
LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

331 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



193 



Lebanon Hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 

211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Hat Cleaning, deblocking 

LADIES' and GENTLEMEN'S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 



GRAN/TINE 
WALL PLASTER 

COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitine Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders' Supplies 

Truscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



S TA TI0NER Y 

PICTURES FRAMES 
KODAKS FINISHING 

Leather Goods 
Lamps and Shades 

HARPEL'S 



THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON* 



C. G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 

43 No. 9th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE CHARM OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



EJ. SNAVELY <£ CO 
Sporting Goods 

Athletic Equipment 
Umbrellas, Trunks 
Hand Luggage, and 
Travelers' Requisites 
MARKET SQUARE 

LEBANON, PA, 



194 



THE CRUCIBLE 



The House of Service and 
SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures. 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville 
National Bank 
Annville, Pa. 



Capital Stock, - 
Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, 



$100,000 



- $175,000 



Ask: to &&& our 

Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 

839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PAo 



Teachers for Schools. 



Schools for Teachers. 



NATIONAL 
TEACHERS 
AGENCY 

Incorporated 
D. H. COOK, MANAGER 

326-27-28 Perry Building, 1530 Chestnut St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Positions always open 
I have promoted over 15,000 teachers. 
Why not YOU? {Signed) D. H. COOK 



Both Phones 

Ask for Simon P. FEGAN 

Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon P. FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



"Say it with FLOWERS' 

The Flower Shop 

19 - 21 North Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front <Sc Map/e Sts Lebanon, Pa. 
Bell Phone 



Ail- American 

M YER'S 

Restaurant 

Eighth <£ Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 




John H. Hull 

The Harley-Davidson Agent 
Forge 6t Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENN. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

^ For Churches, Colleges, Residences, Theatres, 
Etc. Over three thousand in use. The high- 
est grade instruments. Every organ espec- 
ially designed and built for the place and pur- 
pose for which it is to be used and fully 
guaranteed. Every part made in our own 

factory under personal supervision. Booklets 
and specification on request. 

M. P. MOLLER 

HAGERSTOWN - - MARYLAND 

N. B. — Builder of three manual, electric organ in 
Lebanon Valley College. 



SATISFY YOURSELF 

— EAT — 
Burdan's Ice Cream 

at the 

IDEAL 
RESTAURANT 

The Student's Second Home 

L H. ROEMIG, Prop. 

LADIES' ROOMS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



195 

J. R Apple Co. 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 
120 E. Chestnut Street Lancaster, Penna. 

Manufacturers of 

Class and Fraternity Pins 
Rings, Medals, Cups 
Footballs - Basketballs 

Makers o'r 

1922, L. V. C. CLASS JEWELRY 

High Grade Chocolates 

Maillard's of New York 
APOLLO and REYMER'S 
Fancy Gift Packages A Specialty 

In ]/2» 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds 

Various High Grade Confections Always Fresh 
The Store with the Candy with the Snap 

SHOTTS 

127 N. 9th ST. LEBANON, PA. 

Bel 2 7- J 



196 

In stock now, and 
Coming through 
Daily. Low shoes 
For young men and 
Women, designed 
By this shop 
Particularly for 



THE CRUCIBLE 

Young Men and Women 
Who Demand Smart Footwear 
Go to the 

WALK- OVER 

226 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Our college 
Clientele. 
Imported Scotch 
Grain in heavy 
Stitched models. 
Your inspection 
Invited. 




For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can ISow Buy That Hart, Schaffner & Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit or Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



For Rtliable Clothing See 




Bros 



Tailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



THE 
CRUCIBU 



Volume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, April 15, 1921 No. 11 



Editor-in-Chief 

R. RHODES STABLEY, '22. 

Associate Editors 

CARL W. HISER, '22. 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22. 
JOSEPHINE HERSHEY, '22. 

Literary Editors 

MAE REEVES, '23. 
LUCILE SHENK, '23. 

Activity Editors 

PEARL SEITZ, '22. 
HEBER MUTCH, '23. 

Athletic Editors 

HAROLD LUTZ, '23. 
GEORGE HOHL, '23. 



Business Manager 

E. GASTON VANDENBOSCHE, '22. 

Assistant Business Managers 

J. DWIGHT DAUGHERTY, '22. 
ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23. 

Freshmen Representatives 
Editorial Staff 

ELSIE BROWN 
CYNTHIA DRUMMOND 
MARYAN MATUSZAK 
CHARLES SMITH 
MARY YINGER 

Business Staff 

DONALD EVANS 
RALPH MARTIN 



Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 
15c each. Address all communications to E. G. 
Vandenbosche, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Penna. Please notify in case of change in address 
or if you fail to receive your copy. 



EDITORIAL 

We are beginning a new regime. We are stand- 
ing on the threshold of a new year. We have 
taken hold of the reins. 

Pyschology teaches us that new adventures at 
the outset are always full of vision, occupied with 
high ideals and aimed at the highest star in the 
universe. Inspiration runs rampant and ambition 
to achieve something that has yet seemed impos- 
sible is at a full tide. It is here that men dream 
dreams of that which they are going to accom- 
plish; it is here that imagination paints its finest 
picture of fulfillment upon a canvas of golden 
threads; it is here that men breathe the air of 
Mount Olympus and gaze upward into the endless 
void of heaven in glad exultation. 

It is here that men become supermen. 

Now, in powerful oratory and fantastic sweeps 
of the pen, do men declare against the regime 
that has just passed. Bitter words accuse the 
leaders for their inability, their lack of foresight 
and their want of accomplishment. Men become 
bombastic in their efforts to disclose the utter fail- 
ure of the old order; nor does their grandiloquence 
fail when they attempt to eulogize their platform, 
their purpose and their ideals. Much is promised 
in contrast to the old system ; ideal flights of the 
imagination are lowered to a world of practicality ; 
and a complete revolution in method, in form and 
in thought is assured. 

It is here that men become gods. 

The new regime begins. Time passes. The 
casual eye of the keen observer detects a little 



The editors will be pleased to receive articles on 
any subject from professors, students or Alumni of 
the Seminary. 

Entered at the Annville Post Office as second 
class matter. 



dullness dawning upon the starry firmament of 
high ideals. Ambitions somehow do not appear 
so flagrant as they once did and inspiration no 
longer overflows the cup of deed and action. 
Dreams are less fantastic and fmagination uses 
paint of more sombre hue with which to paint 
upon a less costly canvas. The rising sun has 
lost some of its golden brilliance, and at even- 
tide, stars that once were plainly visible are 
vague and indistinct. 

It is here that men become mere men. 

We are at the beginning of a new regime. 
Not as superman do we stand and view our task, 
nor as gods do we eulogize the things we are 
going to accomplish, the new order of things we 
are • going to establish. But we stand as mere 
men. We are facing a big job and we feel our 
own weakness as all men eventually must. We. 
essay to climb to no celestial heights that we may 
save our dreams and aspirations the miserable 
fall to earth ; we stand on no Olympus to breathe 
the air of heaven lest we should soon come down 
to breathe the air of common men. 

MEN like criticism. Criticism means action; 
action means accomplishment. Where is the man 
without enemies who can boast of a single friend? 
Where is he who can say that he has the good 
will and liking of all men and yet show the great 
deeds that he has wrought? We are going to 
make enemies in our forthcoming efforts! We 
are going to make friends! Among our friends 
we shall number those who will tell us wherein 
we fail. We shall consider this the greatest com- 



198 



THE CRUCIBLE 



pliment You could pay us, We like sincerity; we 
hate insincerity ! 

The new staff is going to work hard. We are 
going to try to uphold the standards of our Alma 
Mater. We want your cooperation; we NEED it! 

—THE EDITOR. 

"HER BROTHER" 

Riencourt is a quaint little town situated in 
German territory, immediately across the border 
line of Lorraine, because of its location, its resi- 
dents, especially the -old gray-headed men with 
their long pipes, and the wrinkled old women 
clattering about in their wooden shoes, were still 
loyal Frenchmen. Most of them had lived for- 
merly in the bright, sunny land of France, but 
for various reasons, some to receive better occu- 
pations, others to buy better and larger farms, 
and still others, to escape the law, had moved to 
this town across the border, with its cobblestone 
streets. 

To the first class belonged Georges Dubois, who 
had moved his family from the little village of 
Neuville, France, to this town which flew the Ger- 
man flaer. He had been busy as a cobbler in the 
little village, an occupation at which he scraped 
and hammered from day to night, but which af- 
forded very meager pay as many of his customers 
were" very poor peasants. About six months be- 
fore the great war began, he had moved his fami- 
ly of one son and one daughter to Riencourt where 
he had received large wages at the great govern- 
ment steel works. His son. Arsene, had slipped 
across the border and enlisted in the rapidly- 
swellinor army of Poilus at the beginning of the 
war. This left the little house very lonely and 
quiet as Arsene with his hearty laughs and joy- 
ful songs had livened the whole wooden building 
and had been a great playmate of Lisette, his 
sister, with whom he strolled through his flower- 
covered garden, pointing out to her where he 
would plant the "Legumes" next spring. But 
now, Lisette, his blue-eyed sister, standing there, 
her golden, waving hair tinged with the fading 
rays of the summer sun, had waved a last good- 
bye to her brother with tears in her eyes and a 
smile playing on her lips. Her thoughts raced 
back to the day when her childhood friend, Pierre 
Delsart, had softly pressed her hand and with 
head hanging low, had murmured a faint "Good- 
by. Lisette." 

Lisette had looked longinorly into his big brown 
eyes and had whispered, "Don't be sad, Pierre, 
smile a little; I know we shall meet again." 

That parting was ten years ago, and today 
Lisette, a blithe, young girl of twenty, with her 
kind, mother-like heart was tenderly caring for 
and amusing some German war orphans, whose 
large cheekbones prominently protruded from their 
sallow faces, and whose glassy blue eyes stared 
from sunken, hollow sockets. This home for the 
orphans was situated a short distance down the 
dusty road from Lisette's home and she spent 
most of her spare time attempting to make them 
forget their homes, now empty, and to cheer their 
hearts with stories and games and food. She had 
succeeded in this to a considerable degree, for 
when the little orphans had seen her coming down 



the road with a basket hung across her arm and 
her hands full of violets, or maybe clothes, or per- 
haps books, 'with those funny pictures in', they 
would gather along the big iron fence and yell, 
"Here's Lisette coming; I bet she has some books. 
No, she has some cookies. Ah! She might have 
a pair of trousers for you, Friedrich." 

But this demonstration along the big iron fence 
was small compared to the hugging and squeez- 
ing and kissing and shouting and laughing of the 
orphans when she had entered the gate. Then 
Lisette would kindly order them to 'all sit down 
on the porch in a row." "Now I will give each 
one a cookie, and then I will tell you a story about 
a big bear — and — and, oh, that's right, Heinrich, 
I have a pair of trousers for you. Marie, I have 
a few stitches yet to sew and then your dress will 
be finished. But come now, hurry up and eat those 
cookies and then be quiet while I tell you a good, 
big story." 

After she had told the children the 'good, big 
story' which made the children stare with open 
mouths and gaping mouths until the pleasant end, 
when they all smiled and agreed that it was a 
'bestest' story, Lisette arose and gently placed 
little Margaret on the ground, saying, "Well, my 
dear little tots, I suppose I must leave you. Be 
good girls and boys till I come again tomorrow." 

When she had placed kisses on the foreheads of 
the smallest children, she reluctantly shut the 
iron gate, and strolled down a narrow path to a 
little clump of trees on the outskirts of the village. 
For several months the French had been slowly 
approaching the German border and were now 
onlv a short distance from Riencourt, which was 
still in German hands. This news had greatly 
pleased Lisette since it was the army in which her 
bio: brother, Arsene, and her boyhood friend. 
Pierre Delsart, had enlisted and then too, it was 
the army of her native country — the country that 
she loved. Just yesterday afternoon, a message 
had been brought to her stating that Pierre Del- 
sart was in the company which was now occupying 
the territory on the outskirts of the village. As 
she strolled slowly among the trees gathering 
flowers, she suddenly heard a gay little whistle 
behind her. Swinging around, she at once no- 
ticed a soldier, clad in the uniform of the French 
army, approaching. 

"Oh, it must be Arsene. But he does not walk 
like that. His movements are different. I won- 
der who he is." 

"Hello, Lisette. Don't you remember me," the 
soldier exclaimed. 

"Oh!," she gasped, "it is Pierre. How did you 
happen to be here? You certainly have surpris- 
ed me. Hurry and tell me." 

"Well, you see, I enlisted in the army and am 
stationed only a short distance away. It was very 
quiet all day today, and I stole away to look 
around. I knew that you lived in Riencourt, in 
fact, your brother is in the same company with 
me, and I thought that I might get a glimpse of 
you. But I never expected to talk to you. Tell 
me how everything is. Your father and your 
mother? Are they both well?" 

Lisette immediately began to tell about her ex- 
periences since she left her native country and 



THE CRUCIBLE 



199 



about her parents and about her work with the 
little German war orphans. Just as she finished, 
a crack of a twig and a shaking of a bush near 
rhem attracted their attention, and Lisette warn- 
ingly whispered, "I must go, Pierre, because it 
is against the German orders that girls living in 
German territory talk to French soldiers. That 
order was posted at the beginning of the week, 
i suppose the authorities thought that the Allies 
,TT nuld be in German territory soon. So, goodby, 
Pierre. I might see you again tomorrow." 

Pierre tenderly embraced her, but she was soon 
on her way home, her pleasant thoughts of the 
meeting with Pierre being clouded by the fearful 
thoughts of having been seen talking with a 
French soldier. Entering the small, lowly kitchen 
of their home, she kissed her mother and told of 
her seeing Pierre. "And, mother, I am going to 
meet him again tomorrow, but I am afraid some 
one will see me. But I am going to take a chance. 
I still have that much French spirit left in me." 

But the next morning, a loud, stern knock was 
heard on the door, and Lisette's mother, upon 
opening the door, was greeted by a big, brusque 
soldier in German uniform, accompanied by two 
other German soldiers. 

"We have been ordered to bring your daugh- 
ter before the army court-martial." 

"But, what for!," exclaimed Mrs. Dubois. 

"Lisette Dubois was seen talking to a French 
soldier yesterday in the little thicket of trees on the 
outskirts of the village. Is she in?" He brushed 
aside the old woman and entered the kitchen 
where Lisette was cooking the noon-day meal. 
"Young lady, you are ordered to come along with 
us to the court-martial to be tried for talking to 
a French soldier," he noisily shouted and grab- 
bing her by the arm he led her into the room. 
"Now get your coat and hat and hurry up," he 
puffed. 

Lisette was led away to the officers' headquar- 
ters where she was immediately sentenced to 
death, mainly because she was a French girl — 
the people whom they were fighting and whom 
they hated. Although she had daily and earnest- 
ly cared for the poor little German orphans, yet 
s^e was to be shot to death two days later for 
talking to a French soldier. 

Two days later as they were leading her out to 
the outskirts of the village, where all the convicts 
were shot, the officers and soldiers were somewhat 
alarmed to see some one come hurrying in the far 
distance from the direction in which the Allies 
were located. When this person had come near 
enough for them to distinguish that he had a 
French army uniform on, the lieutenant in charge 
lustily yelled, "Put your hands up, or I'll shoot," 
at the same time aiming his gun. But this did 
not frighten the soldier, who rushed speedily at 
them with his arms raised in the air. 

With a shout he stopped in front of the officer. 
"Hey, that's my sister — She was talking to me — 
I am in the French army. Yes, I am her brother. 
Here are my identification papers — from the gen- 
eral." 

The lieutenant slowly perused the papers, but at 
a slight motion of his handkerchief with which 
Pierre was wiping his perspiring brow a group of 



ten soldiers rushed from a thicket not far away. 
"Charge," he cried, "shoot them if they don't lis- 
ten to you." 

With loud cries of "Kamerad" the German sol- 
diers were hastily marched in the direction of the 
French lines. Lisette stood speechless, somewhat 
dazed by what had happened. Feeling her fore- 
head with her hand, she said dazedly "How did 
you know I was to be shot today, Arsene?" 

"Pirre Delsart told me that he had met you 
in that thicket there two days ago and that you 
were to meet him there yesterday. But he came 
back yesterday afternoon and told me that you 
had not come. As he said, "I wonder if she has 
gotten into any trouble. We might have been 
seen" the thought immediately came into my 
mind that you had been seen and I at once re- 
membered hearing about the German order for- 
bidding the girls to talk to French soldiers. So 
I concluded that you had been caught and had 
been sentenced to die, which is the punishment. 
I told the sergeant about it and he said that he 
would lead a squad of men into the thicket think- 
ing that you might be brought here to be shot. 
So we have been lying there waiting and watching 
all morning. But now, sister, you go back home 
and I will go back to the trenches. Tell mother 
that I shall soon be home and we expect to cap- 
ture Riencourt shortly. And Lisette, Pierre will 
stay with us too, Goodby." 

Arsene kissed her and she went home still con- 
fused by the hurried happenings. But a week 
after. Riencourt was captured during a drive of 
the Allies and was made the headquarters. Ar- 
sene and Pierre were welcomed with much em- 
bracing at the little household. The next day, 
there was still more celebration as Lisette was 
united in marriage to her boyhood chum, Pierre 
Delsart, by the army chaplain. 

—ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23. 

THE FIRST VIOLET 

While wandering on the trail, 

But freshly covered with its grass, 
I revelled in the dale, 

Beholding all that met my gaze. 
The trees were pouring out 

Their lately hidden tender leaves; 
And fragrance all about 

The place was strewn by all the trees. 
And here and there was traced, 

Against the azure-tinted sky, 
A scattering peach tree laced 

With color like the white hare's eye. 
But that which pleased me most 

'Twas not the sky. nor grass, nor trees; 
But 'twas the violet lost 

Among its palace-forming leaves. 

It peeped from its throne 

Of closely clustered leafy green — 
A priceless gem, alone — 

Of all this wakening world, the Queen. 
I gazed adoringly 

And feasted on the lovely sight; 
I went away, kingly — 

I'd seen a bit of godly light. 

— MARYAN MATUSZAK, '24. 



200 



THE CRUCIBLE 



FIT'S HONEST VERDICT 
VI. College Wreckreashun 

Wreckreashun may sound to you like a big word 
but after goin' to college awhile big words don't 
worry nobody much, but of course fer the good 
of the readers who was never at College I may 
state that it means ecksersize or just common run- 
ning jumpin' an' playin'. 

When I was a little codger at school I thought 
I'd like to be a big man an' never never play, fer 
who ever thought a man would play, but at col- 
lege all is changed. They play as much as babies, 
gray-haired perfessers an' all. They run acrost 
the field (in college we call it the campuss) like a 
pack of wild cats an' then back again, after nuth- 
in'. Just want to 'see who can get there first. 
Looks foolish at first but one boy told me it 'ud 
do more to keep me well than the "Granny pills" 
I take at nite an' the rattlesnake beads I wear 
aroun' my neck. Don't look like theys much 
cents to it but they all look husky and I've a mind 
to try it. 

They have a ball they kick. It looks like a 
cannon ball I saw oncet at a county fair, but that 
was made of iron an' this is made of leather. They 
fill it up with air whitch is more plentiful aroun' 
college than sum places. 

Then they have a man whitch they hit an' turn 
head heels over; he is first tied to a tree with a 
rope which won't break an' then they use him 
to train their fists on much like the men Uncle 
Sam used fer us to train our bayonets on in camp. 
Of course he is not a real man, but just as good 
an' the danger is greatly reduced, the trainer 
(that's the wreckreashun teacher) says. 

Sum of the Freshmen git much of there wreck- 
reashun at nite an' also aginst there will, but a 
Freshman's will is on the minority in College. 
Just another of their queer rules. I would say 
funny but they ain't always. 

Gittin' rails an' store boxes an' dead leaves fer 
bonfire's ain't my idea of sellebratin'. 

Down home I always wore a small sunflower 
in my coat, a red ribbon on my hat, wore my coat 
outside in - an' carried a flag in my hand every 4th. 
But in College they aren't no 4ths so they selle- 
brate after every big football scrap usually at 
nite whitch means a bad English lesson fer us 
Freshmen next day. Wreckreashun may be good, 
but one can overdoo anything. Don't you say so? 

Next time I'll tell you about our litter societies. 

—DAVID FIT. 

THE GOLD-TIPPED CIGARETTES 

The Havana Special was passing rapidly thru 
the state of Florida filled with people from the 
north who were going to Florida for the winter. 
As the train rushed on all the travelers seemed 
very much interested in the scenery. But this had 
little effect upon Richard Craig, who sat at the win- 
dow looking out into space. To him this view meant 
nothing. Craig had for many weeks planned to 
spend the Christmas season with his mother who 
lived in Milton, a little town north of New York 
City. But just as he was about to leave New 
York for home he received a telegram from Mr. 



Pierson, a rich New York banker, requesting him 
to come to Palm Beach at once. 

Craig was a detective and he had handled many 
cases for Mr. Pierson. Mr. Pierson and his six- 
year-old son were spending the winter months 
in Palm Beach. Craig could not imagine what 
need Mr. Pierson would have of a detective. But 
his suspense would soon be over as the train was 
backing into Palm Beach. He had wired ahead 
as to the time of his arrival and when he got 
off the train he found the banker's car waiting 
for him. In a few minutes he was at the Royal 
Poinciana, the banker's hotel. It was a magnif- 
icent hotel, but he had no time to observe the 
luxury of his surroundings. He went at once. to 
the banker's rooms. 

The banker greeted him with a nervous hand- 
shake and it was not difficult to see that he was 
laboring under an intense mental strain. 

"I can see that something serious has hap- 
pened," said Craig. "What is it?" 

"Craig," said the banker in a broken voice, 
"my little boy has been kidnapped." 

"What! Kidnapped, did you say?" 

"Yes ; he was taken Saturday morning while 
he was out with his nurse. I will call her at 
once and she can tell you the entire story. You 
must start at once to find him. Money is not 
to be considered ; I will pay you any sum at all, 
just so you brine: back my boy. This is no case 
for the police. That is why I sent for you. The 
work must be done secretly. You are the only 
man for the job. I know you will succeed. I 
will send the nurse in at once." 

In a few moments the nurse appeared. She was 
an extremely good-looking girl, smart and well 
dressed. The detective recognized in her frank 
face and clear, blue eyes an appearance of honesty. 

"Nell", said Mr. Pierson, "this is Mr. Craig. 
He is trying to get Conrad back for us. Tell him 
your story." 

The girl turned to Craig. "I cannot expect you 
to believe all I am going to say, yet I assure you 
that it is the truth." 

"Go ahead with your story", said the detec- 
tive. 

"On Saturday morning I left the hotel with 
Master Conrad and drove up Riverside Drive about 
a mile to a quiet little park called the Garden of 
Eden." 

"Just a moment, please", interrupted the de- 
tective, "How long have you been going to this 
park in that fashion?" 

"Over three weeks." 

"You always go at the same time?" 

"Always". 

"Does anyone else go along?" 

"No one but Willis, the chauffeur." 

Craig turned to Mr. Pierson. "Have you al- 
ways found Willis honest and reliable?" 

"Always", answered Mr. Pierson. 

"Go ahead, please. Miss Benson", said Craig. 

"When we reached the park Master Conrad and 
I got out at the place where we were in the habit 
of playing." 

"Did vou always stop at the same place?" 

"Yes." 

"Go on." 



THE CRUCIBLE 



201 



"We played ball on the grass for about one 
half an hour." 

"How far from the road?" 

"About three hundred feet." 

"Where was Willis?" 

"In the car reading the newspaper." 

"What did you do when you finished plaving 
ball?" 

"I was tired and sat on a bench and looked out 
over the river. The boy was playing ball. When 
I looked around again he was gone." 

"How long was your head turned from him?" 

"About a minute." 

"No more?" 

"No." 

"Did you look around in the park for the child?" 
"Yes, I called Willis and we looked everywhere 
for him." 

Craig left Miss Benson and went to interview 
the chauffeur. But he found the chauffeur a very 
odd character. All the information he got from 
Willis was that he fell asleep while sitting in the 
car and knew nothing of the stealing of the boy 
until the nurse called him to help hunt for the 
child. 

After a short talk with the banker, Craig re- 
turned to the nurse. 

"Mr. Pierson said you were suddenly taken ill 
while out walking yesterday. Tell me about it." 

"It was very mysterious, sir. I went out walk- 
ing along the Cocoanut Trail " 

"Alone", interrupted the detective. 

The nurse colored. "No", she faltered, "I was 
with a friend, but I cannot mention his name." 

"I am sorry, but I am afraid you will have to 
give me his name, Miss Benson." 

The nurse grew almost pale. 

"It was Max King", she answered slowly. 

"Max King", cried the banker. "That is the 
chauffeur I discharged last fall for dishonesty. 
He is your man, Craig." 

"No, No!" cried the nurse. "He has nothing 
to do with this." 

"That remains to be seen", said the detective. 
"When and where did you become ill?" 

"While we were sitting on a bench at the end 
of the Trail", said the nurse. "Then Mr. King 
got a car and I was driven to the hotel." 

"That will do, Miss Benson. Mr. Pierson, 
please have the chauffeur drive us to the place 
where the child was taken." 

It was late that night when Craig returned to 
his room. But the mystery of the kidnapping was 
far from being solved. He was at the park and 
after carefully examining the ground had found 
nothing but the stump of a gold-tipped cigarette. 
He could not understand how any person could 
kidnap a child at that place with the nurse sitting 
on a bench and the chauffeur only three hundred 
feet away. There were no trees or bushes of any 
kind nearby. The kidnapper would have to come 
right out in the open. 

The next day Craig went to the nurse and in- 
quired of her if Max King smoked gold-tipped 
cigarettes. He told her he had found the stump 
of a gold-tipped cigarette at the bench where she 
was sitting. 

He left her room and concealed himself in the 



hall close by. Soon a messenger boy entered the 
room and reappeared with a letter in his hand. 
Craig followed him out of the hotel into the 
street. Then he went up to the boy and grabbed 
him by the arm. He asked the lad for the let- 
ter but the lad refused. The detective showed 
him a five-dollar bill and again asked for the 
letter. The boy gave him the letter, took the bill 
and was gone. 

The letter was addressed to Max King, Room 
145, "The Breakers." "Destroy the cigarettes!" 
These three words comprised the entire contents 
of the note. But it at least gave the address of 
King and Craig was glad, as he wanted to talk 
to King. 

He went at once to "The Breakers." At the 
desk he found out that King was not in. He show- 
ed his card to the clerk, received a kev and went 
up to King's rooms. He entered the sitting room 
and was somewhat surprised to notice a box of 
gold-tioped cigarettes lying on the table. He 
was about to pick them up when he heard some- 
one at the door. He hurried into the bedroom 
and stationed himself behind the curtain which 
separated the two rooms. He couH see into the 
sitting room. A man entered and, af'er (dancing 
auickly around the room, went to the table, nick- 
ed iit) the cierarettes and was gone. But Craig 
coiled not understand why the man should come 
boldly into Kind's room and ret the ciearetts. for 
the man was Willis, the chauffeur. What did he 
want with the cigarettes and how did he know 
thev were there? 

Craif was puzzled. What was the mvstery of 
t^ese cigarettes? He tried to answer this ques- 
tion but could not get anywhere. 

The next day he went to the chauffeur's room 
and, as the chauffeur was not there, he searched 
the room but found nothing. Then he went to 
the hotel p-arage. He looked all thru Mr. Pierson's 
car. In the pocket of the left front door of the 
Packard he found the r^garettes. Feeling some- 
what nervous and tired. Craig decided to walk 
up along the Cocoanut Trail in order to rest. As 
he was sitting on a ben«-h at the very end of the 
T^ail he noticed something in the grass in front 
of him. He picked it up. To his surprise it was 
another partlv-smoked gold-tipped cigarette. Ac- 
cording to Miss Benson's description this was the 
place where she had suddenly taken ill. Craig 
had now in his possession a box of cigarettes with 
two cigarettes taken out and he had a'lso found 
two partly smoked cigarettes of the same kind. 
He was sure now that if he knew the secret of 
the cigarettes he would know more of the taking 
of the child. 

That night in his room the detective smoked 
one of the cigarettes. It gave him a pleasant feel- 
ing and later he started to dream. When he came 
to it was eleven o'clock and he had started to 
smokf at ten. The mystery was becoming clear- 
er. The cigarettes were doped. 

The next day Craig called upon the nurse. 

"Miss Benson, do you smoke cigarettes?" he 
asked. 

The girl looked at the detective for a little while 
and then slowly said, "Yes, I do smoke sometimes." 



202 



THE CRUCIBLE 



"You were smoking the morning the boy was 
kidnapped, were you not?" 
"Yes." 

"You were also smoking the day you were taken 
suddenly ill?" 
"Yes." 

"The smoking did not make you ill, did it?" 

"No, I smoked a cigarette and it made me 
dream. When I came to, I realized that the ciga- 
rette was doped. I then thought that the cigarette 
I smoked the morning the boy was taken was doped 
and that while I was under the influence of 
the cigarette the boy was stolen. It was that 
thought that made me sick." 

B. F. EMENHEISER, '21. 
(To Be Continued.) 

JUST FORTY YEARS AGO 
(A Parody) 

I've just been back to college, Tom, I've sat be- 
neath the tree, 
Where manya a nie:bt in the pale moonlight I 
studied astronomy, 

The old Dog-star was shining, Tom, and it seemed 
to twinkle so, 
As it did when we were younger, Tom, — Just 
Forty Years Ago. 

The sky was just as blue, Tom, the grass was just 
as green, 

But I don't believe that it's been cut since we 
were on the scene. 
The janitor's sleeping on the hill, (I hope he's not 
below) 

For you recall how good he was just Forty 
Years Ago. 

The college halls are altered some, the class chairs 

are replaced 
By new ones, very like the same, our pencils 

had defaced. 
But the same old Profs walk in the halls — they 

hobble to and fro 
And some are wearing the clothes they wore 

just Forty Years Ago. 
I went to find the treasurer — to make a friendly 

call, 

But he had seen me coming and stopped me in 
the hall. 

He took me to his office and then in tones quite 
low, 

He said, "You owe us yet a bill since Forty 
Years Ago." 

He used the same old pen, Tom, and filled the 

same old chair, — 
The room was just as stuffy, Tom, he breathed 

the same old air, 
I drew a paper from my coat, he gave a wail of 

woe, 

When I gave him the receipted bill of Forty 
Years Ago. 

I wandered by the Music Hall, the windows open 
wide, 

My poor heart stirred at the sounds I heard, of 

a murder committed inside, 
A girl was scaline the vocal heights — oh, how her 

bellows did blow, 
It sounded like the cats at night — Just Forty 

Years Ago. 



I went in to the dining hall and scanned the bill 
of fare ; 

The same spitballs were on the walls that we 
fellows had out there, 
The butter came from the same old cow — the 
bread from the same old dough, 
And the eggs from the same old hen we knew 
just Forty Years Ago. 
The coffee came from the same old grounds, tho' 
somewhat weaker and pale, 
The salt was just as Salty, Tom, and the crack- 
ers just as stale, 
I bit into a biscuit — a heavyweight of dough, 
I'm sure it was the last they baked just Forty 
Years Ago. 

My lids have long been dry, Tom, but tears came to 
my eyes, 

As I took a look at the dear old chef and the 
stocks of cakes and pies. 
The chef has grown quite old, Tom, his hair's as 
white as snow, 
He baked these same old cakes and pies just 
Forty Years Ago. 
Well, now we're growing old, Tom, our locks are 
gray and thin, 
Our hair came out without a doubt when knowl- 
edge was pounded in, 
And forty years from now, Tom, when our steps 
are shorter and slow, 
We'll find things just as then they were some 
Forty Years Ago. 

ETHEL M. LEHMAN, '22. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The Y. M. C. A. of Lebanon Valley College has 
passed another successful year under the leader- 
ship of its capable president, John I. Cretzinger. 
It has occupied a prominent position in all social 
events and college activities besides furnishing a 
nucleus for all religious and spiritual work. The 
Star Course was a complete success from every 
standpoint, especially financially and all were well 
pleased with the quality of the numbers on the 
course. Next year promises to be a banner year 
for the Star Course as the best combination of 
theatrical companies has already been booked. 

The new cabinet has already been installed 
with Rhodes Stabley as its chief executive and 
plans are already under way to make 1921-22 a 
worthy year. It has been decided upon to have 
men of note and position to address the men every 
week at the regular meeting, to be held every 
Sunday afternoon at one o'clock. The faculty 
promises hearty cooperation and support to the 
Y. M. in all she undertakes and the old cabinet 
wishes to take this opportunity to express its ap- 
preciation of the hearty manner in which the 
faculty aided the men of the Y. M. 

A notable advance has been made the past year 
when the two christian associations of the college 
decided to work together in all social enterprises 
and this ensures a greater success and achieve- 
ment for the coming year. In union there is 
strength! United we stand; disunited we fall! 

Pretty Co-ed (entering Mathematics Class — "Is 
this French?" 

Young Professor — "No, I'm sorry." 



THE CRUCIBLE 203 



THE ORATORICAL SOCIETY 

Students in the Department of Oratory will be 
interested to know that a Dramatic Arts Society 
has recently been organized for the purpose of 
furthering the study of the direction and present- 
ing of plays and all things necessary to bring 
success to the director, A constitution has already 
been drawn up and adopted under the lead of 
Miss Olive Darling with Professor Mae Belle Ad- 
ams of the Department of Oratory as advisor. 
Miss Edith Stager has been elected president, Mr. 
Russel Bowman, vice-president, Miss Mabel V. 
Miller, secretary, and Mr. Guy Moore, treasurer. 
A program committee, consisting of Misses Mil- 
ler and Garver and Mr. Bowman, have already 
planned interesting programs for the various 
meetings which are to be held every second and 
fourth Thursday of the month. Two programs 
have already been presented. The first of these 
on Thursday, March 10, included a discussion of 
the stage plot by Russel Bowman, Shakespeare on 
the Satege, by Roland Renn ; Review of Article 
on the Dramatic Movement in the Church by 
Katherine Hummelbaugh. The second program 
consisted of a "Resume of the Dramatic Events of 
the Present" by Guy Moore and "Making of the 
Hippodrome Show" by Miss Mae Morrow. The 
societv is open to new members and every one 
should avail herself or himself of the opportunity 
to further her or his knowledge of the Dram- 
atic Art. 

MAY DAY 

Plans for the annual May Day festivities held 
at Lebanon Valley College are well under way 
and the election of the May Queen and her at- 
tendants put new vigor and interest into the mem- 
bers of the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A.'s, who are en- 
deavoring as never before to make it the most 
successful event in the annals of the school. At 
the recent election, Miss Edith Stager of Lebanon 
was selected to be Queen of the May. Miss Sara 
Garver, also of Lebanon, will be the Maid of 
Honor. The Queen's other attendants include 
Misses Ethel Angus of Conemaugh, Emma Witmy- 
er and Gladys Fencil of Annville, Olive Darling, 
of Chandler's Valley, Mabel V. Miller of Reading 
and Mary Shettel of York. 

The committees appointed to carry out the work 
are as follows: 

Representatives from the Y. M. C. A. — Messrs. 
Edgar Hastings, Olive Heckman and Heber 
Mutch. 

Platform Committee — Miriam Cassel, chairman, 
Josephine Hershey, Maryland Glenn, Rachel 
Heindel, Mary Yinger, Esther Singer, Kathryn 
Balsbaugh, Blanche Lengle. 

Processional Committee— Josephine Stine, chair- 
man, Minerva Raab, Ethel Hartz, Verna Hess, 
Esther Brunner, Cynthia Drummond. 

Entertainment Committee — Pearl Seitz, chair- 
man, Meta Burbeck, Verna Pell, IVtae Reeves, 
Kathryn Kratzert, Katherine Hummelbaugh. 

Advertising Committee — Ethel Lehman, chair- 
man, Lucile Shenk, Agnes Merchitis, Mae Morrow, 
Ruth Oyer, Marie Steiss, Helen Hughes. 



Finance Committee — Verna Hess, chairman, 
Anna Stern. 

Demolishing Committee — Eleanor Schaeffer, 
chairman, Edna Baker, Laura Strickler, Anna 
Mae Stehman, Grace Maier, Elsie Brown, Rosa 
Stauffer, Lena Weisman, Florence Witman. 

Through the medium of the Crucible, the 
members of the Y. M. C. A. can ascertain the field 
in which their work toward making May Day of 
1921 the greatest and best success lies. 

MATH. ROUND TABLE CELEBRATES 
ANNIVERSARY 

On Wednesday evening, March 30, the Math. 
Round Table held it's anniversary meeting at 
Professor Lehman's residence. Before the meet- 
ing was called to order the members gazed at 
Venus and Jupiter thru the professor's fine tele- 
scope. Each member responded to roll call with 
a mathematical term of expression. 

Russell Shadel delivered an interesting paper 
on the "Organization of A Mathematical Club." 
He discussed in a clear manner the advantages 
such an organization gives to the members, distin- 
guishing them from those given by the regular 
work in the class room. 

An examination in Algebra was conducted by 
Prof. Lehman, Identical sheets with problems and 
answers were handed to each member. Wit com- 
peted against wit, brains against brains and only 
the brighter ones returned a perfect paper. 

Some of the traditions and amusing anecdotes 
about the most famous mathematicians were re- 
lated by Meyer Herr. 

An important spelling bee was held. The larg- 
est and most difficult words in the mathematical 
dictionary were picked out. Nevertheless, quite 
a bit of time elapsed before the spelling came to 
an end. Then each one had an opportunity to 
set forth any new mathematical trick or problem. 

Refreshments came next. Carrol Daugherty, 
the president, in behalf of the society, presented 
Professor Lehman with a box of choice bon bons 
in appreciation of his ever active interest in be- 
half of the organization. Selected music was 
rendered by the victrola. The meeting was the 
most enjoyable one of this term and the members 
are looking forward to the anniversary meeting 
of next year. 

THE SAINT PATRICK'S PARTY 

On Saturday evening, March 19, Clionian Liter- 
ary Society held its annual Saint Patrick's party. 
From the green decorations to the green design 
on the ice cream, the spirit of auld Ireland was 
predominant. 

The guests began to arrive about eight o'clock 
and were welcomed in a most cordial manner by 
good Saint Patrick himself, garbed in his priest's 
surplice. Then everybody had to hunt the Blar- 
ney Stone before they could enter the parlor. 
Much difficulty was involved in this, which in- 
cluded the journeys from Blarney Castle to Cork, 
to Dublin, to Killarney. and even voyages across 
the Atlantic Ocean to America. 

Then as each one accomplished his or her duty, 
everyone was allowed to enter the parlor. What 
a sight greeted each one's eyes! Visions of 



204 



THE CRUCIBLE 



shamrocks, pipes, hats, greens, here and there 
and everywhere. The white curtains were taste- 
fully arranged with white borders upon which 
were green cut-outs of pipes, pigs, hats, harps, 
shamrocks, and dear knows what. The "little" 
dining room scarcely recognized itself. So great 
was the change thereof. In the center of the floor 
upon which lay beautiful rugs, stood a table with 
a green shaded lamp upon it. At various places 
in the room were other tables at which presided 
girls, who interested one in trying one's skill in 
different contests, such as writing jingles and 
finding certain animals and peoples, etc., from the 
word, shamrock. 

First of all, everybody tried their luck at find- 
ing in the "Big" parlor such articles as corre- 
sponded to the names on a piece of cardboard, 
After that many tried their skill at these different 
tables. Groups were made, and each group had 
its own performance to do, with the obiect guess 
what the pantomines represented. After this, 
prizes were awarded to those who had written 
the best jingle, or had found the right names 
for the objects written on the cardboard, etc. 

Then came the last and best feature of the eve- 
ning. There was ice-cream with a little green 
shamrock design in the center and cake with 
green icing, and sandwiches. 

Finally the party broke up, and all went away 
with happy hearts — except the Demolishing Com- 
mittee. 

ATHLETICS 

Baseball prospects for Lebanon Valley for the 
coming season were given a decided boost when 
it was announced recently that Charles Kelchner, 
more familiarly known to Lebanon Valley folks 
as "Pop", had been secured to coach baseball. 
The coaching position was left vacant by Dr. G. 
Hobart Light when he resigned to accept a post 
as backfield football coach at his Alma Mater, 
University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Kelchner is an 
entirely competent man to succeed "Hobey" 
Light. He was formerly coach at Albright but 
has always taken a fatherly interest in athletics 
at Lebanon Valley and can now put that interest 
to practical use. His ability as a judge of baseball 
material and his knowledge of the game are at- 
tested by the fact that he is a scout for the St. 
Louis Cardinals and has been the discoverer of 
many young diamond stars who have made good. 
He is also industrial secretary at the Lebanon Y. 
M. C. A. 

Prof. Kelchner's selection has lent enthusiasm 
to the training for the coming season. A half 
holiday was given the Freshmen recently and they 
very neatly cleaned off the baseball diamond so 
that it is in excellent shape for the season. Each 
day the candidates are on the field and Captain 
Moore will have plenty of support in his efforts 
to win for the Blue and White. The schedule 
arranged by Student Manager Wolfersberorer has 
already been published in THE CRUCIBLE. The 
first fray is with Lehigh on Saturday, April 9. 

Minor sports are also receiving due attention 
under the supervision of Manager S. Meyer Herr. 
The tennis courts have been put in condition by 
Freshmen and have already become daily scenes 



of action. There are indications for a good track 
team to represent the Blue and White at Harris- 
burg in the Inter-collegiate Meet on May 30, as 
pole vaulters, high and broad jumpers, discus 
throwers, runners, etc., are in daily practice on the 
west end of the campus. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

With the advent of spring and Easter come the 
usual shower of engagement announcements. 
Among them are included the betrothal of Miss 
Laura Millard, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Millard of Millarden, west of Annville and Mr. 
Ernest D. Williams, '17, of Eutawsville, South 
Carolina. 

Also the announcement of the prospective mar- 
riage of Miss Catharine Hamilton, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hamilton, of Duncannon to 
Mr. Robert B. Morrow, '20, of Roaring Springs 
was brought to light at an Easter Tea held on Sat- 
urday, March 26, at Miss Hamilton's Duncannon 
home. 

Miss Emma Witmyer, of this place, announced 
her engagement to Mr. Cawley Stine, '20, of Bone- 
brake Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. Miss 
Witmyer is a talented musician and graduated 
from the Conservatory of Music in 1919 and is now 
pursuing a post-graduate course at her Alma 
Mater. 

President Harding recently appointed Mr. Reno 
Harp, '89, of Frederick, Maryland, to the position 
of United States Commissioner of Fisheries. Mr. 
Harp is well-known among the members of the 
Alumni Association and is very prominent in po- 
litical circles in Maryland. 

Lieutenant and Mrs. Alvin E. Shonk, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, announce the birth of a daughter, 
Mary Jeanette, on March 9, 1921. Lieutenant 
Shonk, who is a graduate of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, class of 1916, served during the world war 
with 334th Machine Gun Battalion and is now a 
first lieutenant in the Infantry Reserve Corps. He 
has been employed for two years in the Bureau 
of War Risk Insurance, but has recently accepted 
a position with the Traveler's Insurance Company. 

JOKES 

Here's An Idea 

I'm through with taxicabs and such, 
The cost of riding is too much 

For Me to bear; 
I've hit upon a better scheme, 
I bo't a 'lectric limousine, 

They charge themselves. 

— Exchange. 

Shadel — "What's the population of Swatara 
Station?" 

Ruth Oyer — "Three hundred — when the train 
goes through." 

Josephine Hershey had just finished describing 
a French kiss. 

Ethel Lehman-^If that's a French kiss, I'll take 
a "Dutch" one. 

Advice to Young Housewives 

If you can't buy milk or cream, use cold cream 
— available at any drug store. 



THE CRUCIBLE 205 

7 

Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Supplies 
Guitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Music 
Music Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 



See the New Styles 

in 




The Shoeman 
•'The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 

see 

J* S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F*ei. 



Need et new/ 

Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and Sporting 
Goods? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E. M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



206 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Newgard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 
Dealers 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Harry Zimmerman, D. D.S. 
DENTAL PARLORS 

72 West Main St. Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them— We Rebuild and Reweid Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
See if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 

2nd Walnut Streets HARRISBURG, PA. 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

W. R. WALTZ 

BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 

Cakes, Tobacco 
Oysters and Fish in Season 
E. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



THE CHUCIBLE 



207 



THE 



CRYSTAL 

Restaurant 

C. D. Papachristos 
John Boutselis 



OPPOSITE PENNSYLVANIA 
RAILROAD STATION 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sport 

Kodaks Toys 
Bicycles Guns 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 
205 MARKET STREET 

Harrisburg, Penna. 
Ladies 9 and Gentlemen's Furnishings 

KIN PORTS 

AnnvMe, Pa 

Students' Discount 

Packard and American Lady 
SHOES 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



SPALDING 



Athletic 

Equipment 

For 

Every 

Indoor 

And 

Outdoor 

Sport 



BASKET BALL, BOXING 
GYMNASIUM CLOTHING 
ICE SKATES AND SHOES 

Send for Catalogue 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
I 126 Nassau St. N. Y. 




CLOTHING 

FOR 

Well Dressed 
MEN 

McFall & Son 

Third & Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



208 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Q 
I) 
A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



QUALITY C 



E 
R 
V 
I 

c 

E 




SERVICE 



£ov>cr ^Prices 

(Dur Entire §toc^ of COocf ens 
3Cas 3c>eeT> 3Tlar^ecl Z)o\Ci\ 



Try US for 

NEW SUIT 

Sanest \0or^n>ai>sfyip cu>ci 
(Smartest <bt\|fes 



oWer 



5"cifor, ^Representing G^rowh\ing> 3*ving ai\ct ©o. 




Himt Ctes^ M©&ls 
N©wly FmimSskodI RcodDHims 
With MumnMg W&feir 

3tersfte^ s Superior 
C$ce ©ream 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 

CLOTHING 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


W 7VY Rohland 

l Fresh and Smoked Meats 
Poultry, Milk, Butter 

3 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


Remodeled Refurnished 
European Plan Rooms $1.50 

Hotel Walton 

Fred Ehrhorn, Proprietor 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Lebanon, Ir^a 


Miss L. A. Krum 

Millinery 

And 

Exclusive Shop for Women 

119 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Harvey L. Seltzer 

une riicc tioinicr 

And 

Men's Furnishings 

The House of Good Values 
769 Cumberland Street, 

Lebanon F^a. 


Fink's Bakery 

Best Baked Products 

You Pay for the Articles. 

Quality and Service Oost You 
Nothing ! 


Students 

Do You Want 

Room Furnishings 
Sporting Goods 

H Miller 

ANNVILLE, PA 


Quality Service 

Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hostetter 

217 B. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



"The Live Store" "Always Reliable" 
Everything Is Reduced at the Big 

DOUTRICHS 




DOWN 




All Manhattan Shirts are HALF Price 

All Neckwear is HALF Price 

All Hats and Caps are HALF Price 



All $40.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 

All $45.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 



$27.75 
$29.75 



;>ats <jj^^ 75 



and Suits Reduced 

$37.75 



All $55.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 



All $60.00 Overcoats 
and Suits Reduced to 



$41.75 



All $1.00 and $1.25 Silk Hosiery Reduced to 75 cts. 
All 60 ct. Monito Hosiery Reduced to 39 cts. 



DOUTRICHS 

304 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Petma. 



Press of Halzaptel Publishing Company, Cloona. Pa 



vrs. Edoi Swanger 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pa. 




APRIL 29, 1921 




Junior Number 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students' Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop'* 



$1.00 a Week 

WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 

Watch and Diamond 
CLUB 

The P. H. Caplan Co. 

The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 

206 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



H. J. COLOVIRAS C. S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS 9 
CARAMELS, ETC 

SWEET LAND 

Light Lunches, 
Ice Cream and Sodas 

LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
ICENT ICE CREAM PAR- 
LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

331 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



What Makes the Firefly Glow? 

YOU can hold a firefly in your hand; you can boil water 
with an electric lamp. Nature long ago evolved the 
"cold light." The firefly, according to Ives and 
Coblentz, radiates ninety-six percent light and only four 
percent heat. Man's best lamp radiates more than ninety 
percent heat. 

An English physicist once said that if we knew the fire- 
fly's secret, a boy turning a crank could light up a whole 
street. Great as is the advance in lighting that has been 
made through research within the last twenty years, man 
wastes far too much energy in obtaining light. 

This problem of the "cold light" cannot be solved merely 
by trying to improve existing power-generating machinery 
and existing lamps. We should still be burning candles if 
chemists and physicists had confined their researches to the 
improvement of materials and methods for making candles. 

For these reasons, the Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company are not limited in the scope of 
their investigations. Research consists in framing questions 
of the right kind and in finding the answers, no matter 
where they may lead. 

What makes the firefly glow? How does a firefly's light 
differ in color from that of an electric arc, and why? The 
answers to such questions may or may not be of practical 
value, but of this we may be sure — it is by dovetailing the 
results of "theoretical" investigations along many widely 
separated lines that we arrive at most of our modern 
"practical" discoveries. 

What will be the light of the future? Will it be like that 
of the firefly or like that of the dial on a luminous watch? 
Will it be produced in a lamp at present undreamed of, or 
will it come from something resembling our present incan- 
descent lamp? The answers to these questions will depend 
much more upon the results of research in pure science than 
upon strictly commercial research. 



GeneratllEi 



General Office O III U £1 II V Schenectady, N. Y. 



210 THE 

The House of Service and 
SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures. 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Annville 
National Bank 
Annville, Pa. 

Capital Stock, $100,000 

Surplus and 

Undivided Profits, - - : - $175,000 

Ask to see our 



839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PA 

Teachers for Schools. Schools for Teachers. 

NATIONAL 

TEACHERS 
AGENCY 

Incorporated 
D. H. COOK, MANAGER 

326-27-28 Perry Building, 1530 Chestnut St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Positions always open 
I have promoted over 15,000 teachers. 
Why not YOU? (Signed) D. H. <?OOK 



CRUCIBLE 

Both Phones 

Ask for Simon P. FEGAN 

Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon . FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 

"Say it with FLOWERS' 

The Flower Shop 

19 • 21 North Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front Maple Sts Lebanon, Pa. 

Bell Phone 

All- American 

M YER'S 

Restaurant 

Eighth & Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 




John H. Hull 

The Hurley-Davidson Agent 
Forge & Willow Streets 
LEB\N0N, PENN. 



Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 



THE CRUCIBLE 



211 



Newgard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 
Dealers 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



Harry Zimmerman, D. D.S. 



DENTAL PARLORS 



72 West Main St. 



Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them-- We Rebuild and Reweid Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
See if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 

2nd 9r Walnut Streets HARRISBURG, PA. 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

W. R. WALTZ 

BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 
Cakes, Tobacco 

Oysters and Fish in Season 
E. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 





THE CRUCIBLE 




In stock now, and 


Young Men and Women 


Our college 


Coming through 


Who Demand Smart Footwear 


Clientele. 


Daily. Low shoes 


Go to the 


Imported Scotch 


For youn£ men and 


WALK- OVER 


Grain in heavy 


Women, designed 


Stitched models. 


By this shop 


226 Market Street 


Your inspection 


Particularly for 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Invited. 



Lower Prices 

For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can Now Buy That Hart, Schaffner & Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit er Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

For Reliable Clothing See 

Lvawn Bros, 

Tailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



THE 
CRUCIBLE 

Volume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, April 29, 1921 No. 12 



Editor-in-Chief 

E. RHODES STABLEY, '22. 

Associate Editors 

CARL W. HISER, '22. 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22. 
JOSEPHINE HERSHEY, '22. 

Literary Editors 

MAE REEVES, '23. 
LUCILE SHENK, '23. 

Activity Editors 

PEARL SEITZ, '22. 
HEBER MUTCH, '23. 

Athletic Editors 

HAROLD LUTZ, '23. 
GEORGE HOHL, '23. 



Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 
15c each. Address all communications to E. G. 
Vandenbosche, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Penna. Please notify in case of change in address 
or if you fail to receive your copy. 



EDITORIAL 

In the comedy, "As You Like It", William 
Shakespeare has stated that the life of man is 
divided into seven ages. Each of these ages rep- 
resents an act in the drama of life, and could well 
be compared to a great play. Thus, we find the 
college life similar to this idea. We will call it 
a four-act play entitled, "The Perfecting Of An In- 
dividual", and will present in it four different 
scenes. 

The scene for the first act is a verdant meadow 
and there are many characters used in it. The 
actors for this first act are a timid, frightened- 
looking group, each one anxiously performing his 
part to suit the fancy of some superior individual. 
Their career is one greatround of examinations, and 
re-examinations, which accounts for the worried- 
looking expressions found upon their faces. They 
are learning the art of strenuous application in this 
act, endurance, humility and submissiveness to 
higher powers. Nevertheless, they regard life 
lightly and are careless and carefree in all that 
they try to do. 

The -second act is played upon a hill-top, and 
we find these same actors a complacent group with 
self-satisfaction written on all their countenances. 
They are proud of their superior position, and dis- 
play at every opportunity before their verdant 
brothers and sisters. Yet in spite of this hill of 
conceit upon which they are acting, they are play- 
ing a wiser and more serious part than they played 
in the first act, and are still learning the virtue of 
humility. 



Business Manager 

E. GASTON VANDENBOSCHE, '22. 

Assistant Business Managers 

J. DWIGHT DAUGHERTY, '22. 
ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23. 

Freshmen Representatives 
Editorial Staff 

ELSIE BROWN 
CYNTHIA DRUMMOND 
MARYAN MATUSZAK 
CHARLES SMITH 
MARY YINGER 

Business Staff 

DONALD EVANS 
RALPH MARTIN 



The editors will be pleased to receive articles on 
any subject from professors, students or Alumni of 
the Seminary. 

Entered at the Annville Post Office as second 
class matter. 



The scene for the third act is laid underground 
in an elfin workshop. The stage settings are com- 
posed chiefly of desks, stools, typewriters, print- 
ing presses and volumes upon volumes of books, 
quite weighty in their appearance. We see the 
players, although greatly decreased in numbers, 
yet a very busy group, buzzing about in haste, 
giving one the feeling of an undercurrent of sup- 
pressed excitement and actioa. 

In one corner, there is a busy group, some at 
tvpewriters, others writing furiously upon huge 
sheets of paper, with stacks of the same piled 
by their sides. We notice at the top of these 
sheets written the word "Quittapahilla." 

A few pre-occupied-looking characters are 
wielding a huge quill pen uoon a sheet of paper 
at the top of which the word, "Crucible", is writ- 
ten. 

This is on the whole a very busy act, each and 
every character having 1 some task to perform, or 
some duty assigned to him. 

The scene for the last act is one of ease and 
luxury. We see the actors, now a staid and dig- 
nified group leisurely strolling about with appar- 
ently nothing to do. They speak with authority, 
and the spirit of self-reliance and independence 
exudes from their entire being. They realize that 
although they have not acquired ideal individual 
perfection, they have gained it in part, and that as 
the curtain goes down upon this fourth and last 
act, and their little company disbands, they will 
have done their best to prepare to play their 
parts in this great world of competing actors. 



214 



THE CRUCIBLE 



SIGNS OF SPRING 

"Whew! Hanged if it Hain't rainin' agin! 
This tarnal wet weather sure does git in ones 
bones tho. Ye don't mind ef I stand me umbrelly 
thar b'the cracker barrel, do ye, Bill? Uh-huh. 
I jest thought I'd drop in to see ef ye had yer 
garden seeds in yit. Ye know spring plantin's 
here now. Eh? Not yit? Oh well, I guess we 
can't git much done in this kinda weather enny- 
how. Ugh! Ouch! — That rheumatiz got me yit, 
Bill." 

"Ye-a-ah, spring's here alright. I heard the 
birds singin' this mornin' 'fore breakfast. I sez 
to my wife, 'Sarah Jane, hear them birds? Wal, 
spring's comin' fast. We gotter git them seed 
'taters cut 'cause plantin' time'll be here soon. 
'N then there's the corn patch to git plowed'n 
that tarnal garden to spade. I jest know my 
lumbago'll come back agin if I spade thet whole 
garden arotn'. ' But Jane, she jest laughs 'n 
sez, 'Well! Sam, ye know they's always three 
things what tells me spring's here.' "What's 
them?' sez I 'n she sez, 'Ferst is when the birds 
git to singin' in the old pear tree by my winder 
every mornin'. Second is when the grass 'gins 
to git green 'n mossy like to yer feet 'n the buds 
peep outer the black twigs, 'n third is your reg'- 
lar spell of rheumatiz 'n lumbago.' Heh! Hen ! 
Thet's a joke on me, ain't it?" 

"I walked down to Hank Jones today to see 
'bout plowin' my corn patch. Hank's all het up 
'bout the warm weather we're havin' these days. 
Sez he 'spects to git all his hosses on the job soon 
es it dries off a little. Yes, Hank's a putty spry 
ole bird fer his age, too. Now I wuz layed up by 
the rheumatiz a coupla day 'count o' this wet 
weather. I hain't altogither over it yit, nuther. 
But, Hank! Gosh! he jest hops aroun' like he 
wuz a two year old. He's gitten out all his plows 
'n jiggers for this season so's he kin start right on 
the job. 

"Say Bill, d'ye read in yistiddy's paper 'bout the 
lightin' strikin' and burnin' down old John Gal- 
ley's barn up the country apiece? Sorter hard 
on the ole man, wasn't it? Thet storm sure was 
a surprise, the ferst of the season, too. Gosh ! I 
wuz jist airin' my rheumatiz 'n bang! she goes off 
almost scarin' me into a fit. Ennyhow, it's a sure 
sign o' spring meaning we ain't gonna have no 
more snows, ner frosts, ner freezes fer a spell. 
Wal, I can't say as I keer much. It'll do a fel- 
ler good to git outen the fresh air agin' after sit- 
tin' by the stove all winter, doncha think so, Bill? 

"Wal, I gotter be goin' now. Sarah Jane sez 
I must help her cut some 'taters this evenin'. 
Ow! my rheumatiz sure gits me when I stand 
up. Yes. Good-bye, Bill. Let me know when 
them seeds come in." 

CHARLES C. SMITH, '24. 

In men whom men condemn as ill, 
I find so much of goodness still ; 
In men whom men pronounce divine, 
I find so much of sin and blot; 
I hesitate to draw the line 
Between the two where God has not. 

— Millar. 



FIT'S HONEST VERDICT 
VII. Litter Societies in College 

Litter Societies is the kind a litter of boys be- 
longs to who are banded together fer the mutual 
consolashun of each other in college. Rube Slat- 
ter who calls himself the perfesser of nonsents 
told me so, though he doesnt teach nothing much, 
but still he seems to know it all 0. K. 

I joined the litter society after I learnt that 
it intended to invest the initiashun fee fer my 
development. They initiated me twiste, as they 
said the first one didn't take. It took my breath 
and my nerve of which I had a great deal an 
needless to say, it took my five dollars. 

They do many things of interest in the society 
besides inishiate you, (since its secret I cant tell 
about that part) among which are, calling rolls, 
singing and reading while the boys yawn or stick 
each other with pins to keep up interest, as they 
say. They said they was going to have a pant 
o mine one performance, but when I looked I saw 
very well it wasent none of mine. 

Ped Wingifry, one of the members, maid us a 
long speech one bitter cold night, which added 
to the bitterness of the performance, and when 
he was threw, one of the boys asked fer venti- 
lashun, owing to the closeness of the room. I 
guess Peds speech kind of hit him, as the sub- 
ject of his number was The injury of Slaivery, and 
the other feller's grandfather uste to keep slaives 
until the Civil war. 

They have parlimentory drill in litter Society. 
Its very much like army drill, only they drill you 
on your chair insted of on your feet, with your 
chair, bed and tent on you. Oncet during a drill 
a feller said I move you we paint the piahno 
green. Most of em laft, but the pres. just gently 
said, "Your out of order." I guess he was. Our 
pres. is a peach. He woodent hurt your feelins 
if he was a doctor. 

He wears a black gown something like Ant 
Mandy uste to wear after her man dyed of hy- 
drantfobia. He looks like a king on the chair 
where he sets, but he goes bareheaded. 

I am going to debate before long on the sub- 
ject of "Resolved, that folding beds are a detri- 
ment to this grate land of ours. I shall write my 
debate fer you to read next time. Fer any sug- 
gestshuns you may chance to offer I will be very 
grateful. 

DAVID FIT. 

THE GOLD-TIPPED CIGARETTES 

(Continued From the Last Issue) 

"But why did the chauffeur not see the kidnap- 
pers although you were sleeping?" asked Craig 
quickly. 

"He said he was asleep." 

"Miss Benson, I do not believe it. Do you know 
that he stole this box of cigarette* from King's 
room?" said Craig as he held the box before her. 

"But Mr. King had nothing to do with it." 

"Why did he have the cigarettes?" 

"He took them the day I got sick." 

"Why did you send him the note telling him 
to destroy them?" 



THE CRUCIBLE 



215 



"Because I thought if they were found on him 
he would be suspected." 

"Where did you get the cigarettes?" 

"Willis got them for me." 

"Does he usually buy your cigarettes?" 

"Yes." 

"I see", said Craig. "Miss Benson, Willis is 
responsible for getting you the doped cigarettes. 
He knows more about this case than he cares to 
tell. He knew that it would be very easy for him 
to get the child, with you under the influence of 
the doped cigarette. He is either the kidnapper 
or some tool for the kidnapper." 

"But why should he wish to take the child", 
inquired the nurse. 

"More for money than for anything else", 
answered the detective. "He knew that Mr. 
Pierson would pay any sum to get the child back." 

That night as Craig sat in his room by the win- 
dow smoking his pipe he was thinking hard. He 
had solved the mystery as to the way in which the 
child was taken and he was almost certain of the 
person who took the child, but the most difficult 
task remained. How could he prove it and get 
the child back? He was nervous and excited. 
This case had been an jitvtuI strain on :iim. He 
knew that sleep was impossible, so he went out 
into the garden around the hotel and sat down on 
a bench. He was about the only person in the 
garden, as it was almost midnight. While he was 
sitting there partly concealed by the shadow of a 
tree, he saw a familiar figure pass by. He looked 
the second time. It was Willis. Where could he 
be going at this time of night? Craig deter- 
mined to follow him and find out. He went along 
Palm Walk for a short distance and then com- 
ing to an orange grove he went in between the 
trees quickly. Craig kept as close as he could 
without being detected. On went Willis thru 
orange grove, fields and into a small woods. In 
the corner of the woods was a little cottage. 
Willis was making for the cottage. Upon reaching 
it he entered. The detective drew up as close as 
he could and hid behind a tree. He could see 
the interior of a room thru the open window. In 
the center of the room there was a table. He saw 
a little, dark-faced man place a lantern on the 
table. Then Willis and this man pulled chairs up 
to the table and began to talk. Craig drew a 
little closer and listened. 

"But you promised to relieve me of the child 
today", said the man. 

"I could not, but vou need not worry; there 
is no danger," said Willis. 

"No matter about the danger. I only agreed 
to come to the park and take the boy, and hot 
to keep him. I warn you that I will not keep 
him any longer than forty-eight hours." 

"Remember, Meconi, you took the child. Vou 
do as I say or I will expose you to the police", said 
Willis. 

"I took the child but if you don't get him away 
before forty-eight hour-; are up you will be ex- 
posed yourself. I mean to go straight from now on. 
Get me." 

Willis did get him. He knew that Meconi 
meant what he said. 

He turned to the little man and talked i,n so 



low a tone that Craig could not understand it. 
They talked in this manner for almost an hour. 
Then Willis left the cottage. Craig, not earing to 
run chances of being sjeen by him, kepi; far be- 
hind. 

Wh^n Craig called to see Mr. Pierson the next 
day he found the banker in great excitement. The 
banker handed Craig a letter which he was hold- 
ing in his hand. 

"Place a package containing One Hundred 
Thousand Dollars in the hollow of that big tree 
at the south end of Cocoanut Trail tonight at eight 
o'clock and make no effort to capture any one 
who may come for the money later. If no at- 
tempts are made to arrest anyone your child will 
be returned to you within two hours after you 
place the money there. If you fail to fulfill these 
conditions your child must die." 

The letter was written in a very poor hand. 
Craig knew that Willis had written it and then 
Meconi copied it off, as Willis's writing would be 
too familiar to send to Mr. Pierson. 

"What will you do about it", asked Craig. 

"Why, take the money out tonight, of course," 
said Mr. Pierson. 

"Just as I thought", said the detective. "You 
will give up that money to get the boy, and how 
about the rascals who have taken him?" 

"I don't care what becomes of them so long as 
I have my boy, and as for the money I can give 
it without missing it." 

"But I can get your boy without you losing the 
money", said Craig. And then he told the banker 
what he had found out <"he night before. lie told 
the banker that he had a plan to get the boy 
and the men. But the banker would not listen. 

"What if your plans should fail and my boy 
be killed", said the banker. "No, you must not 
interfere. I will fulfill the conditions of the letter 
and get my boy." 

Craig knew that it was useless to try to get 
the banker to give in. But as he left the banker's 
room he made up his mind that he would get the 
bov, and Willis as well, and recover the money. 
But he must work out some plan and also not in- 
terfere with the conditions set forth in the letter. 

An hour later he called the chauffeur. 

"Willis, drive me to the station." 

"Are you going north again?" asked Willis. 

"Yes, I am afraid the child is a goner, Willis. 
I have done my best but cannot locate him. It 
surelv is a mysterious case", said Craig, eyeing 
the chauffeur closely. 

The chauffeur took him to the station and saw 
him get on the Florida Limited bound for New 
York. Crai<? realized what effect this would have 
on Willis. He knew that the chauffeur would not 
be on his guard as much as if he would have re- 
mained in Palm Beach. At West Palm Beach 
Craig got off the train and went at once to the 
police station. He explained his case to the chief 
and asked him for a couple men for that nisrht. 
The chief gave him three of his best men. The 
detective knew it would not be safe to make a 
move until evening. But at seven o'clock he start- 
ed with his three men for the hollow tree. 

Thev made the trio in a car which he hired at 
West Palm Beach. He stopped within a quarter 



216 



THE CRUCIBLE 



of a mile of the tree, parked the car behind some 
bushes and then led the men closed to the tree. 
They concealed themselves as best they could be- 
hind trees or bushes. They had not been there 
very long until Craig saw Mr. Pierson come down 
the Trail with a package under his arm. He 
dropped it into the hollow of the tree and hur- 
ried away. About half an hour later another 
person came up to the tree. Craig wondered; it 
was not Willis. But then, of course, Willis 
would not come ; it would be too risky. Craig 
looked more closely and soon recognized it to be 
none other than Meconi. He signalled his men to 
follow about thirty feet behind him while he fol- 
lowed Meconi. Meconi hurried across the fields 
to the little cottage in the woods just as Craig 
had expected. When the little man entered the 
house, Craig told two of his men to stay out- 
side and guard while he and the third man went 
inside. He told them to use their guns in case 
anyone tried to escape. 

He entered the cottage, gun in hand, the other 
man following him. Meconi threw up his hands 
at once as he was covered by the detective's gun, 
but Willis, realizing his danger, sprang for the 
window. When he reached it he was surprised to 
find a revolver pointed at him thru the open win- 
dow. He could not see the person holding it, but 
he stopped. When the two men were handcuffed, 
Craig sent one of his men for the car which they 
had left close to the hollow tree. The other men 
guarded the prisoners while he searched the cot- 
tage for the boy. He looked thru the entire 
house but could not find any signs of a child any- 
where. What should he do? Mr. Pierson would 
never forgive him for interfering with his plans 
and then not returning with the child. 

He came to Willis and asked him where he had 
hid the child, but Willis would not open his mouth. 
Craig was in despair. He must find the child. 
He could not look the banker in the face again 
unless he got the boy. He searched the house 
once more, but without success. He returned to 
Willis, but the chauffeur was in an ugly mood 
and said he would never tell him. Then he turn- 
ed to Meconi. The little man at first was immov- 
able. Craig pleaded with him to tell where the 
lad was. At last Meconi said, "I was only a tool 
in this entire affair. If I tell you where the kid 
is will you promise to free me?" 

"I must hold you as a witness, of course, but 
after the trial is over, I promise you that you shall 
go free." 

Willis looked at Meconi and cursed him. "You 
yellow dog", he said, "So you will tell, will you?" 

The little man how showed his anger. "Shut 
up, you damn rascal. You led me into this, made 
me run the risk for you for the small sum of one 
thousand dollars, and now you want me to sit 
in jail for your wrong. But you are fooled. You 
may call me yellow, if you wish. I am going 
straight from now on." 

He turned to Craig. "The boy is in the cel- 
lar." 

"The cellar", said the detective. "How do you 
get to it. I don't see any door of any kind that 
leads to a cellar." 



"Move that couch away from the wall", said 
Meconi. 

Craig moved the couch and found a trap door 
which he opened. Taking a flashlight he hur- 
ried down into the cellar. He soon appeared with 
a boy in his arms. The boy was pale and thin. 
He had been crying when Craig found him. 

The policeman was back with the car and they 
all started for Palm Beach. Craig, who was at 
the wheel, drove the car at a high rate of speed. 
When they arrived at the hotel he hurried to Mr. 
Pierson's room, leaving the prisoners in charge 
of the policemen. He entered the banker's room 
with the child in one arm and the package of 
money in the other. 

Mr. Pierson saw only his son. He took him in 
his arms and kissed him again and again. Then 
Craig gave him the package. The banker was 
surprised. 

"Did you get the boy and the money?" 

"Yes, and the kidnapper also", said Craig. 

Then he told the banker the entire story. 

Mr. Pierson took the detective's hand and said, 
"I can never repay you for this service. My boy 
is my only joy and you cannot realize the service 
you have rendered me." 

"Was only too glad to do it for you, Mr. Pier- 
son", said Craig. 

"Craig, you are great", said Mr. Pierson, his 
voice a little broken. "I want you to stay here 
over Christmas as my guest." 

"I am sorry, Mr. Pierson, but I cannot stay. I 
want to spend my Christmas vacation with Moth- 
er. I just have time to catch the midnight train 
for New York", said Craig. And in a moment he 
was gone. 

THE POLES 

It is in comparatively-recent times that the 
Poles have become a christianized people. Of 
all the peoples of Europe, with the exception of 
the Scandinavians, they were about the last to 
accept the Christian faith. But it was not by 
peaceful or Christ-like means that this was ac- 
complished. Even today the people speak with 
bitterness in their traditions about the White 
Knights with the Red Crosses who came into their 
country, killing and plundering the people and 
forcing them to take up Christianity. This was 
the beginning of that hatred between the Poles 
and the Germans, for the Teutonic Knights 
wrestled away all of what is now known as East 
Prussia — their real aim having been to enrich 
themselves and to gain territory instead of a 
crusade for the Truth. 

Perhaps, the greatest international crime com- 
mitted in the history of the World was the parcel- 
ing of defenseless Poland among Germany, Russia 
and Austria-Hungary in the latter half of the 
eighteenth century. It was the most shameful, 
unpunished robbery ever committed by any nation. 
For the last two centuries and a half, Poland has 
been under the rule of these three robbers, until 
she again gained a separate existence by the 
Treaty of Versailles. 

After this partition, the Poles, who have al- 
ways been intensely liberty-loving people, tried at 
various times to throw off the yoke of their mas- 



THE CRUCIBLE 



217 



ters. Dissensions, however, always defeated their 
purpose. Only during the age of Napoleon did 
they seem to be on their way to freedom. But 
when that man broke his promise to the Poles, by 
which he had gained their support in that ter- 
rible campaign against Russia, the betrayed na- 
tion fell back into slavery, never to become free 
until the end of the Great War. 

The three despoilers, due to the efforts of the 
Poles against their oppression, instituted a pro- 
gramme of steady extinction of Polish thought, 
aspirations, and feelings. This programme of de- 
nationalization was furthest carried out by Russia 
and Germany, especially the latter, due to that 
country's "Inefficiency." It was this country's 
policy to forcefully destroy Polish individuality 
and by this means to compel the Poles to become 
Germans — a method which may be contrasted 
with that used by America, which allows its for- 
eign-born people, of their own will, without using 
any compulsion, to become Americans. In execut- 
ing this policy, Polish soldiers were sent into the 
most dangerous places in battles, particularly in 
the late European War, so that the Poles as a 
separate race would be wiped out. Polish men 
were not allowed to become officers in the army. 
They were also not permitted to occupy any po- 
sition that had to do with the government. In 
schools during the last two generations, the Polish 
language was forcefully abolished, the pupils be- 
ing fearfully punished if found using the Polish 
tongue. The high mortality rate of Polish school 
children was in part due to the cruelty and most 
unchristian and barbarous treatment given them 
by the German schoolmasters. 

In spite of the efforts of her conquerors, Poland 
has maintained a distinct individuality. Very lit- 
tle impression has been made upon her religion. 
Whereas the religion of Germany is mainly Pro- 
testant, there are only about two per cent, of the 
Polish people that do not belong to the Catholic 
Church. Though some very noted scientists have 
been Poles, the majority of the people still be- 
lieve in the old superstitions that were a part of 
the Christian belief of a century or so ago. God 
still voices His displeasure to them, especially to 
those of the older generation, in the sound of 
thunder and glimpses of heaven whenever 
lightning takes place. The theory of evolution is 
not even speculated upon by the mass of the peo- 
ple. The belief in magic and ghosts is still wide- 
spread. Sunday is a day that is still kept holy, 
though the younger people are rapidly approach- 
ing the view that Sunday was made for man, not 
man for Sunday, as more up-to-date countries do. 

Poland is noted in other countries for her art. 
She has produced many great musicians, singers 
and dancers. Music and dancing are national 
traits. These accomplishments, though of course 
in a humble way, are practiced everywhere by the 
people in their homes. Every boy learns to play 
some musical instrument or other and every girl 
knows how to dance. 

Poland has always been a land of peasants, 
though there are also many towns and cities. 
Since the country is rather crowded with people, 
the peasants have to use their land as usefully as 
possible, every inch of ground being under cul- 



tivation. Thus, the Polish peasants have become, 
perhaps, the most economical and efficient petty 
farmers in the world. 

The government that the new republic of Poland 
has recently adopted is one of the finest types 
of democracy. The government is truly in the 
hands of the people. There is a House and a 
Senate, whose members are elected by the peo- 
ple, any man or woman over twenty-one being 
eligible. The chief executive is the President, 
who is elected for seven years by the House and 
the Senate. Modern religious toleration is shown 
in the choosing of the President in that he may 
be either a Catholic or a Protestant, though there 
are only about two percent, of the people who are 
not Catholics. The Poles have even so far given 
free rein to their principles of liberty that the 
schools in the different communities will be con- 
ducted in the language that each particular com- 
munity desires, all schools to be partly supported 
by the government. Thus there will be no official 
attempt made to cause the people of Poland to 
speak but one language. 

Many people have emigrated from Poland to 
America. Here they have been readily assimilat- 
ed into the American race, since they are naturally 
intelligent and since they themselves are a liberty- 
loving people. They have contributed much to 
American art, especially, to music, in which they 
may be said to excel. The opera has been much 
enriched by men and women from Poland. The 
children of the immigrants, being but a step 
from Poland and knowing what it means to be an 
American, are grasping all the educational oppor- 
tunities that American schools offer. Thus it is 
that Polish names are distinguishing themselves 
everywhere in the realm of knowledge, especially 
in science. 

From the viewpoint of civilization and progress, 
the world owes much to Poland and her people. 
It was the Polish army under Sobieski that check- 
ed the tide of on-advancing Mohammedanism at 
Vienna. America owes much to the generalship 
of Kosciuzko and Puluski during the American 
Revolution. In very recent times Europe was sav- 
ed from Russian Bolshevism by the victory of the 
Poles at Warsaw. With this repulse, Bolshevism 
began its now rapid decline and another World 
War was averted. 

MARYAN P. MATUSZAK, '24. 
KALO ANNIVERSARY 

Friday, April 8, was the occasion of the Forty- 
Fourth Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary 
Society. Early in the year, plans were laid to 
make their anniversary one of note and, by the 
criticisms of its "invites", Kalo may well be proud. 

The principal attraction was the address by Dr. 
D. J. Cowling, a former Kalo and now President 
of Carelton College, Minnesota. During the year 
1918-19, he was President of the College Presi- 
dents' Association of the United States. Kalo 
was, indeed, fortunate to secure the services of 
such an eminent man. His theme was philsophi- 
cal and yet practical and his advise was sound. 
He urged all students, at this time of shifting of 
beliefs, to find something they can believe and 
cling to it. The manner in which Dr. Cowling 



218 



THE CRUCIBLE 



handled his audience showed him also to be a 
student of men. 

The remainder of the programme consisted of 
society talent, all of which did credit to the par- 
ticipants and to their society. Mr. Guy W. Moore 
presented a complete and interesting history of 
the literary club from earliest times to our pres- 
ent society. Mr. Ira M. Ruth then gave two pipe- 
organ selections of his usual fine quality. Last 
'of all, Mr. Benjamin F. Emenheiser sang beauti- 
fully, "Tommy Lad". 

The usual refreshments were served in the 
Alumni Gymnasium, an added attraction being 
the rendition of several vocal selections by Master 
Sickels, the boy soprano singer of Harrisburg, 
which were applauded repeatedly by the folks 
gathered in the gymnasium. And so the eventful 
occasion ended, whose spirit Dame Nature, in spite 
of her contrariness, could not dampen. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

Rev. Harry Kleffman, '16, of Baltimore, Md., 
who is pastor of the Fulton Avenue Presbyterian 
Church in that city, made an address before a 
group of about 500 visitors of the Masonic Order 
on the evening of Good Friday. Rev. Kleffman 
is progressing remarkably in all of the depart- 
ments of his church work. 

• Rev. Phares B. Gibble, of Baltimore, Md., had 
the honor of addressing the members of the Am- 
erican Oriental Society at the final session of its 
one hundred and thirty-third annual conclave, 
which met in the Civil Engineering Building at 
John Hopkins University, at Homewood. Mr. 
Gibble, who is a student of Professor Paul Haupt 
at John Hopkins, explained at length the fine 
points in the study of the old Hebrew and Arab 
languages which seemed to recommend slight 
revisions in the Bible. Mr. Gibble has been elect- 
ed to membership in this society, which is one 
of the oldest of American Societies for the dis- 
cussion of scientific matters. Papers were also 
presented by Dr. Edward Chiera of the University 
of Pennsylvania, Rev. Dr. James B. Nies, of 
Brooklyn, New York, and by Miss Eleanor F. F. 
Yeaworth of John Hopkins University. 

EURYDICE NOTES 

The Annual Concert of the Eurydice Choral 
Club of Lebanon Valley College will be held on 
Tuesday evening, April 26, 1921, at 8 o'clock in 
the Engle Conservatory of Music. Mr. Errol K. 
Peters, a baritone from New York, will be the 
soloist of the evening. 

We remember quite well the unusual pro- 
gramme the Eurydice presented us last year and 
we are hoping that this year's programme will be 
as good; in fact, we believe it will be hotter 
because much time has been spent in the prep- 
aration of the programme. 

ATHLETICS 

The Blue and White baseball team, under the 
able leadership of our coach, Charles Kelchner, of 
Lebanon, opened the season very auspiciously. If 
the brilliant playing of the team in the two games, 
which have been played, is considered, one 
of the most successful years for the baseball end 



of athletics may be predicted by the excellent 
showing made by the baseball tossers of Lebanon 
Valley in these two games. On Saturday, April 
9, the team journeyed to Bethlehem, escorted by 
Jacob Wolfersberger, the student manager. With 
the sting of the 13 — 3 defeat received at the hands 
of the Lehigh nine last year still fresh in their 
memory, they played their utmost, determined to 
wipe out that defeat and replace it with a victory 
or with a defeat bearing a smaller margin. The 
Blue and White team accomplished the latter de- 
sire and went down fighting to a 2 — 1 defeat. 
With Walter Wolfe, the brilliant southpaw of 
Lebanon Valley, pitted against Johnny Lees, the 
Lehigh thrilling battle was staged, which 

was not decided until the ninth inning, when Lees 
hit and was advanced by Rote and Savaria and 
scored on Homan's error. In the third inning, 
the Lebanon Valley tossers had put their forces 
together and Finn, the little left-fielder crossed the 
rubber with our one well deserved run. In the 
eighth inning, Wolfe reluctantly handed Donovan, 
who was batted for Rogers, a base on balls and 
after being advanced to third by his fellow-play- 
ers, he stole home, thus tying the score. The 
pitching of Wolfe was of mid-season style, his 
southpaw slants causing seven to fall by the strike- 
out route and he only allowed three men to reach 
base by walking. But the main cause of the de- 
feat was the meager amount of hits garnered by 
the rest of the team, as only Captain Giggs Moore 
and Catcher Scootie Matchton were able to touch 
Lees, each one scratching a single out of his fast 
ones. The line-up and score were : 

Lebanon Valley 





r. 


h. 


0. 


a. 


e. 


Cohen, ss 








2 








Finn, If 


1 





1 








Matchton, c 





1 


7 


1 





Moore, lb 

Smith, rf 





1 


11 


1 











1 








Nitrauer, cf 








1 








Homan. 3b 








1 


1 


1 


Uhler, 2b 








1 


4 





Wolfe, p 








2 


4 


1 


Totals 


1 

Lehigh 


2 


25 


11 


2 




r. 


h. 


0. 


a. 


e. 


Rote, ss, 2b 








3 


3 





Savaria, cf, 2b 





2 


1 








Yap, 2b, lb 





1 


1 


1 





Larkin, rf, cf 








1 








Norkiewicz, If 


. . . : o 





2 


1 


1 


Rogers, lb .... 








7 








Donovan, ss 


1 














Simpson, 3b 











2 


2 


Lee, rf 

















*Maginnes 

















Sehring, c 








11 


1 


1 


Lees, p 


1 


1 


1 


2 






Totals 2 4 27 10 4 

*Batted for Simpson in eighth. 
Lebanon Valley 00100000 — 1 
Lehigh 1 1—2 

Stolen bases — Donovan, 2; Matchton, 2; Cohen, 



THE CRUCIBLE 



219 



Finn. Bases on balls — Off Lees, 1 ; off Wolfe, 3. 
Struck out — By Lees, 9; by Wolfe, 7. Left on 
bases — Lehigh, 3 ; Lebanon Valley, 3. Umpire — 
McBride. 

With the defeat at the hands of the Lehigh nine 
spurring them on to greater deeds, and with a few 
more base-hits sticking in their bats, the Blue and 
White autoed to Mercersburg on Saturday, April 
16, and by the mercy of old Jupiter Pluvius were 
able to pack away in their bat case a 3-2 eleven- 
inning victory, which the old man above men- 
tioned did not allow them to do last year. This 
time, Leon Witmer, the other southpaw ace of the 
team, made his debut for this year and it may be 
truly called a first-class debut, as Lefty not only 
pitched in gilt-edge manner but he virtually pull- 
ed his own game out of the Lost-column when he 
poled out a home-run in the third inning after 
Henny Homan, the minature third sacker, had 
singled. Beside this record, can be placed the 
facts that Witmer struck out 15 men and granted 
only two free tickets to the eagerly-sought-for first 
base, and also the fact that the team played with 
the pep of a rookie before the eyes 'of a major 
league scout, clouting out 9 healthy swats and 
committing only two errors. But all the while, the 
strong Mercersburg Academy team were putting 
forth all their strength. They too gathered 9 
hits off the offerings of Witmer, two of which were 
triples by Caldwell, the Left fielder for Mercers- 
burg, who had a gala day with the bat as he 
smote out three hits and drove in both runs for his 
home team. Adams, the Mercersburg Academy 
hurler, also was working in tip-top fashion as he 
made 7 men churn the air and did not issue one 
lonely pass. The score and line-up were : 

Lebanon Valley 





ab. 


r. 


h. 


0. 


a. 


e 




5 





1 


2 


2 





Finn, If 


5 








1 








Matchson, c . 


5 





1 


15 


1 


1 




5 








11 


1 







4 





2 


1 










3 








1 










4 


1 


1 





4 





Uhler, 2b 


4 





1 


2 


2 







4 


2 


2 





3 


1 


♦Wolfe, 


1 

















Totals 


40 


3 


6 


33 


13 


2 




Mercersburg 












ab. 


r. 


h. 


0. 


a. 


e 


Trumbower, rf 


5 








1 








Boohecker, ss 


4 





1 


1 


4 


1 


Johnson, 3b . 


5 











1 





Hoffman, lb . 


5 


2 





14 


1 





Caldwell, If 


5 





3 


1 


1 





Paddock, cf . 


4 





1 


4 





1 


Heath, 2b 


5 











1 







4 





1 


12 










4 





1 





4 





Totals 


41 


2 


7 


33 


12 


2 



*Batted for Heiss in 10th inning. 



Mercersburg 0001000100 0—2 

Lebanon Valley, ...0020000000 1—3 
Stolen base — Paddock. Bases on balls— Off 



Adams, ; off Witmer, 2. Struck out — By Adams, 
7 ; by Witmer, 15. 

With a percentage of .500, Lebanon Valley can 
feel proud of its baseball team and can feel as- 
sured of a successful season. After the summer 
sun begins to send down its blistering rays, the 
bats will begin to pick up a few more base hits 
and the pitchers will have their desires as most 
of them favor the kind of weather that makesthem 
sweat. With the first appearance of the team 
several new faces were seen. Replacing the di- 
minutive Williams at short last year, is seen Rube 
Cohen, another midget, cavorting around capably 
in that difficult position; Finn and Smith, two 
newcomers, are helping Nitrauer and Heiss in the 
outfield, and Uhler is ably filling Bachman's shoes 
at second. Otherwise, the team lines up in the 
same manner as last year, with the reliable 
Matchton in the backstop position, the fast work- 
ing Captain Giggs Moore at first, and the two 
southpaws of last year, Wolfe and Witmer, tak- 
ing their turns in the box, but who will be ably 
supported by Whistler and Yake, both right- 
handers. On Thursday, April 21, the team leaves 
on an up-state tour, playing Juniata on Thursday, 
Bucknell on Friday, and the undefeated Penn 
State team on Saturday. This is the first of the 
several three day trips and the team is hoping 
to come back with two more victories for the 
Win Column. 

A LA STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Mary had a little man, 

His head was big, but hollow; 
And everywhere that Mary went 

That man was sure to follow. 

He tagged her to the "post" one day, 

Against all regulations; 
Conversing with her on the way 

With wild gesticulation. 

But though they lengthened out the time 

By languor's slow assistance, 
They found the road from "dorm" to "post" 

Was far too short a distance. 

And so they ambulated on, 

Till stars peeped out in heaven, 

And never started back again, 
Till after half-past seven. 

Now every evening, in her room, 

Poor Mary languishes; 
The man, reflecting on her doom, 

In perfect anguish is. 

The moral for all youths is this : 

If you your maid would keep, 
Treat her with manly courtesy, — 

But don't become a sheep. 

IVA C. CRETT. 

Adapted From Witmer's Notebook 

"Tell me not in truthful numbers, 

Love is but a happy game; 
For since I've had the sweet sensation, 

I never more can feel the same." 

Ruth Oyer: — Do you have Mary and everything 
else with you? 



220 



THE CRUCIBLE 



WHY NOT YOU? 

There are others about you, my brothers, 
Who are doing their best for the world ; 
They have taken their place in the army, 
Their battle flags they have unfurled. 

They face with a heart brave and sturdy 
The problems that need to be solved ; 
And the reason that they have done it, 
Is just because they resolved. 
Why not you? 

They toil thru sunshine and shadow, 
They keep right on in the fight; 
They are found at their place of duty, 
Not only by day but by night. 

It brings a success that is olden, 
Yet a success that is ever new. 
Be none of the many idlers; 
But just be one of the few. 
Why not you? 

Thru all the ages of mankind, 
But two classes are 'fore my sight; 
The one which was laureled the victor, 
And the other which failed in the fight. 

The world needs those who are ready, 
Not only to strive and to give, 
But those who have learned that their duty 
Is really and truly to live. 
Why not you? 

JAY ARNOLD, '22. 
A FABLE 

One fine Day in Heaven, a young Bell Hop, (I 
do not at once recollect the celestial Name for 
Bell Hops) came bouncing down the Street of Gold 
looking and calling for Saint Patrick. By Chance 
Saint Patrick was attending a Spiritualist Meet- 
ing in Saskatchewan and, of course, could not be 
found. Another Irishman, who in some Way or 
another had got into the Beautiful City, happened 
to be near by and offered to substitute for the 
grand old Saint. The Substitution was at once 
affected and Mike (that was the Irishman's 
Name) went to receive his Message. 

Now, Mike was not a particularly bright or 
clever Saint, though of course he was good at 
heart and loved his native land ardently. Con- 
sequently, when he fuond that a group of Men 
down below on the Emerald Isle wanted Saint 
Patrick's advice on how to get Home Rule in Ire- 
land, he was quite at a Loss. He had no Time 
to waste, so he quickly replied, "Fight, Boys, 
Fight. It's the only Way you'll, ever set auld 
Ireland free." 

It is Human Nature for Men, especially Irish 
Men, to do what the Spirits tell them. So these 
people began at once to do as they were told. 
There were no Englishmen present, so they fought 
each other and found the fighting so good that 
they did not bother to wait for the English. They 
have been fighting ever since and Home Rule for 
Erin's Land is a Thing still for the Irish to look 
forward to. 

Moral — Don't be a Spiritualist. 

—CYNTHIA DRUMMOND, '24. 



JOKES 

A June bug married an angleworm, 

An accident cut her in two ; 
They charged the bug with bigamy; 

Now what could the poor worm do? 

— Exchange. 

Love's Labor Frost 

I penned a purling poem to Nan, 
"Your eyes are stars", the thing began, 
"Your lips, your hair", and lots beside, 
I mailed it in a flush of pride. 

I got a letter soon from Flo, 
As cool as concentrated snow; 
"Your poem received", the note began 
And ended thus : "Some girl — This Nan." 

— Exchange. 

"The height of ignorance is to copy the name of 
the fellow sitting next to one in a written quiz." 

— Exchange. 

Ashes to ashes and dust to dust, 

If Jiggerboard doesn't get you, the Faculty must. 

Want Ads 

WANTED — At the library, one floor lamp, sev- 
eral easy chairs, and one extra-size davenport for 
socializing purposes. 

WANTED — By South Hall, an extra-size, heavy 
hose for ducking purposes. 

WANTED — A stop watch on Wednesday eve- 
nings, by Socializers and Company Limited. 

South Hall Chant 

"Faith, Hone and Charity, but the greatest of 
these is Love." 

Ed — I'd rather be a business man than a doc- 
tor. 

Mid— Why? 

Ed — Because a business man works while a doc- 
tor only practices. 

— Exchange. 

"One little kiss, just one," he plead; 
She shook her head — and then: 
"Why only one, poor fool?" she said 
And promptly gave him ten. 

— Brown Jug. 



Fordham Law School 

Wool wort H Building 

Co-educational 

CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 

AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 

Write for Catalog "V" 

CHARLES P. DAVIS. Registrar. 
"Wool worth Building 
NEW YORK CITY 



tHil CliUClSLE 



221 



Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Snpplies 
Guitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Music 
Music Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 



See the New Styles 

in 




The Shoeman 
•The Home of Good Shoes" j 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 

see 

J. S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F*ei. 




Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and Sporting 
Goods? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E. M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



THE CR 



UCIBLE 



Q 
I) 
A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



QUALITY § 




SERVICE 



E 



£<yu?er ^Prices 

Our Entire <§too^ of COoolens 
3Cas 5c>eei\ 3Tftar^e<l £)ov?n 

Try US for yowr 

NEW SUIT 

finest v^or^mansfyip ar\cl 
<§n\artest §t\jfes 



am 



5"ptfor, 'Representing drowning* 3^»ng cn>& ©< 
iiefe>ai)or\, ^Pa. 




eniwtfavj 

(SUnrftfe, 0c 

OgM Lmim<slh@s samd 
Firstf: Class M©als 

With Mmmmfo&g Wfflteff 

3Cersfte\j s Superior 

ream 



THE C 

Lebanon Hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 
211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Hat Cleaning, Reblocking 

LADIES' and GENTLEMEN'S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 

GRANITINE 
WALL PLASTER 
COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitine Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders' Supplies 

Truscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENNA. 

STATIONER Y 

PICTURES FRAMES 
KODAKS FINISHING 

Leather Goods 
Lamps and Shades 

HARPEL'S 

"THFGIFT STORE OF LEBANON" 



UCIBLE 223 

C. G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 
43 No. 9th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE CHARM OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



E J. SNAVELY 6c CO 

Sporting Goods 

Athletic Equipment 
Umbrellas, Trunks 
Hand Luggage, and 
Tra vellors * Requisites 
MARKET SQUARE 

LEBANON, PA. 



224 



The crucible 



THE 

CRYSTAL 

Restaurant 

C. D. Papachristos 
John Boutselis 

OPPOSITE PENNSYLVANIA 
RAILROAD STATION 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sport 

Kodaks Toys 
Bicycles Guns 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 
205 MARKET STREET 

Harrisburg, Penna. 
Ladies 9 and Gentlemen's Furnishings 

KINPORTS 

Annville, Pa 

Students' Discount 

Packard and American Lady 
SHOES 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



SPALDING 






Hi) i^fc 


Athletic 








Equipment 








/For 








Every 








Indoor 








And 








Outdoor 








Sport 




BASKET BALL, BOXING 




GYMNASIUM CLOTHING 




ICE 


SKATES AND SHOES 






Send for Catalogue 


A. G. Spalding & Bros. 


! 126 Nassau St. N. Y. 



CLOTHING 

FOR 

Well Dressed 
MEN 

McFall & Son 

Third & Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 

CLOTHING 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


W 7V\ Rohland 

i Fresh and Smoked Meats 
Poultry, Milk, Butter 

3 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


Remodeled Refurnished 
European Plan Rooms $1.50 

Hotel Walton 

Fred Ehrhorn, Proprietor 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Lebanon, Jr-*& 


Miss L. A. Krum 

Millinery 

And 

Exclusive Shop for Women 

119 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Harvey L Seltzer 
One Price Clothier 

And 

Men's Furnishings 

The House of Good Values 
76Q Cumberland Street, 

Lebanon Pa 


_ — 

Fink's Bakery 

Best Baked Products 

• 

You Pay for the Articles. 

Quality and Service Oost You 
Nothing ! 


Students 

Do You Want 

Room Furnishings 
Sporting Goods 

1 H W Miller- 

ANNVILLE, PA 


Quality Service 

Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hostetter 

217 B. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



"The Live Store" "Always Reliable" 
Everything Is Reduced at the Big 






DOWN 





All Manhattan Shirts are HALF Price 

All Neckwear is HALF Price 

All Hats and Caps are HALF Price 

All $40.00 Suits and Jj*^ 7 75 



Overcoats Reduced to 

All $45.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 

All $50.00 Overcoats 
and Suits Reduced to 

All $55.00 Suits and 
Overcoats Reduced to 



and Jjj2Q 75 

All $50.00 Overcoats <j)33 75 
All $55.00 Suits and ^^7 75 



All $60.00 Overcoats 7^ 
and Suits Reduced to H*^" 1 * A 

All $1.00 and $1.25 Silk Hosiery Reduced to 75 cts. 
All 60 ct. Monito Hosiery Reduced to 39 cts. 

DOUTRICHS 

304 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Petina. 



Preii of Holiapfel Publiihiag Company, Cleona. Pa 



vrs. Edna Sanger 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pa. 




MAY 13, 1921 




Faculty Number 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students 9 Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop" 



$1.00 a Week 

WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 

Watch and Diamond 

CLUB 
The P. H. Caplan Co. 

The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 

206 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



H. J. COLO V IRAS C. S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS, 
CARAMELS, ETC 

SWEETLAND 

Light Lunches, 
Ice Cream and Sodas 

LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
ICENT ICE CREAM PAR- 
LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

331 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



209 



THE 

CRYSTAL 

Restaurant 

C. D. Papachristos 
John Boutselis 

OPPOSITE PENNSYLVANIA 
RAILROAD STATION 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sport 

Kodaks Toys 
Bicycles Guns 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 
205 MARKET STREET 

Harrisbu rg, Penna. 
Ladles* and Gentlemen's Furnishings 

KINPORTS 

Annville, Pa 

Students' Discount 

Packard and American Lady 
SHOES 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



SPALDING 



Athletic 

Equipment 

For 

Every 

Indoor 

And 

Outdoor 

Sport 



BASKET BALL, BOXING 
GYMNASIUM CLOTHING 
ICE SKATES AND SHOES 

Send for Catalogue 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
126 Nassau St. N. Y. 




CLOTHING 

FOR 

Well Dressed 
MEN 

McFall & Son 

Third <S Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



210 THE 

The House of Service and 
SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures* 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville 
National Bank 
Annville, Pa. 

Capital Stock, $100,000 

Surplus and 

Undivided Profits, - - : - $175,000 



Ask: to &&& our 

Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 

839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PAo 

Teachers for Schools. Schools for Teachers. 

NATIONAL 

TEACHERS 
AGENCY 

Incorporated 
D. H. COOK, MANAGER 

326-27-28 Perry Building;, 1530 Chestnut St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Positions always open 
I have promoted over 15,000 teachers. 

Why not YOU? (Signed) D. H. COOK 



CRUCIBLE 

Both Phones 

Ask for Simon P. FEGAN 

Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon . FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 

"Say it with FLOWERS' 

The Flower Shop 

19 ■ 21 North Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front <£ maple Sts Lebanon, Pa. 
Bell Phone 

All-American 

MOYER'S 

Restaurant 

Eighth <£ Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 




John H. Hull 

The Harley-Davidson Agent 
Forge St Willow Streets 
LEB\N0N, PENN. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



211 



Newgard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 
Dealers 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



Harry Zimmerman, D. D.S. 



DENTAL PARLORS 



72 West Main St. 



Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them— We Rebuild and Reweid Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
See if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 



2nd f Walnut Streets 



HARRISBURG, PA. 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

W. R. WALTZ 

BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 

Cakes, Tobacco 
Oysters and Fish in Season 
E. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



212 


THE CRUCIBLE 




In stock now, and 


Young Men and Women 


Our college 


Coming through 


Who Demand Smart Footwear 


Clientele. 


Daily. Low shoes 


Go to the 


Imported Scotch 


For young men and 


WALK -OVER 


Grain in heavy 


"Women, designed 


Stitched models. 


By this shop 


226 Market Street 


Your inspection 


Particularly for 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Invited. 



Lower Prices 

For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can IVow Buy That Hart, Schaffner & Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit or Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

For Reliable Clothing See 

Lawn Bros, 

T ailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



THE 
CRUCIBLE 



Volume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, May 13, 1921 No. 13 



Editor-in-Chief 

R. RHODES STABLEY, '22. 

Associate Editors 

CARL W. HISER, '22. 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22. 
JOSEPHINE HERSHEY, '22. 

Literary Editors 

MAE REEVES, '23. 
LUCILE SHENK, '23. 

Activity Editors 

PEARL SEITZ, '22. 
HEBER MUTCH, '23. 

Athletic Editors 

HAROLD LUTZ, '23. 
GEORGE HOHL, '23. 



Business Manager 

E. GASTON VANDENBOSCHE, '22. 

Assistant Business Managers 

J. DWIGHT DAUGHERTY, '22. 
ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23. 

Freshmen Representatives 
Editorial Staff 

ELSIE BROWN 
CYNTHIA DRUMMOND 
MARYAN MATUSZAK 
CHARLES SMITH 
MARY YINGER 

Business Staff 

DONALD EVANS 
RALPH MARTIN 



Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 
15c each. Address all communications to E. G. 
Vandenbosche, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Penna. Please notify in case of change in address 
or if you fail to receive your copy. 



The editors will be pleased to receive articles on 
any subject from professors, students or Alumni of 
the Seminary. 

Entered at the Annville Post Office as second 
class matter. 



EDITORIAL 
INDIVIDUALISM 

It is interesting to note that in the life of a child, 
after a certain age, or more properly, a certain 
development has been reached, he begins to think 
for himself instead of taking the thought of others 
as final. He becomes more self assertive both in 
thought and act. His life experiences what it 
has not experienced before and what it can even 
now but dimly understand — the dawning of a new 
and distinct personality. The mere fact that he 
may recoil from some of his former opinions does 
not make him a revolutionist, although he may be 
one. He is merely asserting an inherent right 
as an individual. 

His personality is not exactly like that of any 
other person among a thousand millions, nor 
should it be. His likes and dislikes become pe- 
culiarly his own, and so they ought, for God never 
made two flowers exactly alike, and it would be 
the height of inconsistency to think of a world 
where folks were alike in every respect. 

It is true that during the age of hero-worship 
the child will appropriate certain qualities from 
those whom it admires, whether those qualities be 
commendable or otherwise. He will learn to do 
and say much by imitation and in the very act of 
imitation his own personality will be in the process 
of development. Perhaps his personality differs 
from that of any other partly because the com- 
bination of his heroes differs just a little from the 
combination that anyone else has chosen. Be that 
as it may, in all normal children the development 



of this individualism is obvious, and therefore it 
is not a thing to be suppressed nor directed into 
unnatural channels, but to be allowed to pursue a 
normal course to its proper conclusion. One's in- 
dividualism will express itself without conscious 
direction. The handwrite. the gait, the stroke 
on a musical instrument (if the subject be a mu- 
sician), the spoken and written forms of rhetoric, 
all exnress in their own peculiar way the indi- 
viduality of the person who makes use of them. 

Of course there must be restraints placed and 
limitations set uDon everyone's individualism if it- 
interferes with the free exercise of another being 
possessed of a similar right. "My privilege ends 
where the other man's nose begins" is an old 
maxim whose truth is almost universallv agreed 
with, but this does not give anyone a license to 
attempt to make me dispossess myself of those 
traits that make me a different person from any 
other instead of a mere cog of a great dead 
mechanism. It is equally disgusting for me to at- 
tempt to be another person than myself. If I am 
reasonably successful in playing the part in the 
great game of life of the fellow who is more 
successful than I, then I am a counterfeit and 
counterfeits are used to get something for nothing, 
and the very law of compensation will not al- 
low such a condition long to obtain. If I would 
be successful then, I must be myself and not the 
other man. Of course one's success on the stage 
lies in his ability to be the other man; but on the 
stage of life we are not imitators and counter- 
feits, but the original copy, if we would live up to 
the privileges of individualism that are ours. 



214 



THE CRUCIBLE 



INTERPLANETARY COMMUNICATION 

Is interplanetary communication possible? Can 
we harness the intangible forces of Nature and 
bid them carry our thoughts to distant worlds? 
To say it is impossible is too bold a statement. 
To prove its possibility would require evidences 
of actual thought transmission ; and so we re- 
main between the two fences in the field of dis- 
cussion. The foremost scientists of the day, among 
them Marconi, Edison and Tesla have expressed 
their opinions, some negative, others affirmative. 
The world but waits for some man to come for- 
ward who has the initiative and means to put the 
question to actual test. 

For interplanetary communication we must 
first have someone to communicate with. In other 
words, we must be sure that other planets are 
inhabited. This has come to be an accepted fact 
by most scientists and astronomers. And why 
not? It is not unreasonable to believe otherwise? 
We believe that God's primary object in the crea- 
tion of the universe was to provide a dwelling 
place for humanity. This fact He clearly indi- 
cated when He created man in his own image. 
It is foolish then to believe that He has confined 
man's development to so comparatively small a 
body, for after all the Earth is but a speck in 
limitless space. An atom lost in an infinity so 
vast that the wisest cannot fathom it, hurled 
through space by the unseen hand of cosmic 
forces. Consider that the single star, giant Betel- 
guese, is equal in volume to fifty-two trillion of our 
earths, and you have a slight conception of its in- 
finitesimal size. The distribution and develop- 
ment of life would not be limited to one single 
planet. 

Our communication, however, would be limit- 
ed to our own solar system. To the present time 
the maximum velocity attained by any object or 
vibration is that of light, which is about one- 
hundred-eighty-six thousand miles per second. 
Therefore, using light as our medium, it would 
take four and a third years to reach Alpha Cen- 
tauri, the nearest star to our own solar system. 
Very little progress could be made if we had to 
wait eight and a half years for an answer to every 
message we send. 

Within our own system too, we would doubtless 
be limited. Mercury is too close to the sun and 
is doubtless a dry barren waste baked hard by 
the enormous heat of the sun. Saturn with its 
mysterious rings is but a fiery mixture of gases 
and molten matter, a planet still in its youth and 
not sufficiently cooled for habitation. Jupiter, the 
biggest of our system has a very dense atmos- 
phere. This, and also its greater distance makes 
observation rather difficult so that we can only 
guess at is surface conditions. Uranus and Nep- 
tune are too far removed for a trial attempt at 
communication. There remains only Mars and 
Venus. Both of these, as far as astronomers can 
tell have the necessary elements for the develop- 
ment of living organisms. Venus however has 
such a thick layer of clouds that observation is 
rather difficult. The favored planet then, for 
the first attempt, would be Mars. But again there 
are grounds for doubt. Assuming that there are 



inhabitants on Mars, how do we know thatthey 
have sufficiently advanced in civilization to inter- 
cept our messages and answer intelligently? 

Mars to us appears as a dull red star. In a 
large telescope this color or rather a reddish 
brown is still predominant. At the poles only 
is there any marked difference in color. Some 
astronomers in interpreting these facts explain 
that the greater part of Mars is a barren desert, 
just as the Earth has great oceans, so Mars has 
her vast deserts. The lighter portions at the poles 
are probably snowcaps since they vary in size 
with the changing seasons. If, the, the develop- 
ment of Mars has been analogous to that of the 
Earth, she must have passed our present stage 
long ago and be approaching the period of i so- 
called old age. Can we assume that their civil- 
ization and culture has advanced proportionately 
with the increased age? If the canals discovered 
there are not illusions we have reasons to be- 
lieve they are very intelligent. Without a doubt 
such a network of systematically arranged canals 
would not be cut out by Nature. Expert engi- 
neering could be the only explanation. We might 
then imagine the Martians as a race of super-men 
who would consider our greatest discoveries as 
mere elementaries. They may have mastered 
arts of which our wisest men have never dreamed. 
The puzzling question then arises, if they are so 
far advanced, why have they not attempted to 
open communication with us already? For sure- 
ly they must know of our existence. Marconi 
and Tesla, noted radio experts, claim that they 
have frequently heard signals which could not 
come from Earth stations. Attempts have been 
made to find out definitely but only negative re- 
sults have been obtained. 

What shall be our medium of transmission? 
Our thoughts turn first to light, for it was that 
which first disclosed to us the other planets. It, 
too has the maximum velocity as mentioned before. 
Several methods have been suggested by scien- 
tists for the use of light as a means of transmis- 
sion. While some may seem plausible, the diffi- 
culties to overcome make most men doubt the pos- 
sibility of their application. For instance, some- 
one suggested the construction of immense mir- 
rors, so placed that the rays of the sun could be 
reflected in daytime to the night side of Mars, 
while messages could be received on our night 
side from Mars. This would necessitate a system of 
stations encircling the Earth. Another sugges- 
tion is the use of a vast bank of powerful search- 
lights with suitable blinking apparatus. Still 
another was the construction of immense geo- 
metrical figures on the Sahara Desert. Since 
geometry is a subject which is likely to be under- 
stood on Mars the inventor thinks it would form 
a medium between the languages of the Earth 
and Mars. So dozens of plans might be named, 
and in each, one can pick out weaknesses and 
flaws. The use of Selenium cells however offers 
promising prospects. Selenium is very sensative 
to light and is already used in the study of light 
rays and light intensities. In it we find possi- 
bilities of not only detecting code signals but even 
voice and music as well. Another medium of 
communication would be wireless telegraphy. As 



THE CRUCIBLE 



215 



before mentioned, Marconi and Telsa claim to 
have heard wireless signals from Mars. The be- 
havior of wireless impulses in interplanetary space 
is not known but it is believed that with a very 
powerful transmitting station impulses could be 
sent out sufficiently powerful to reach Mars. It 
has been suggested that all the powerful stations 
of the United States combine their energy into 
a single unit which could be controlled by one 
key. Waves from such a source would be picked 
up by the supermen of Mars if there be such. 

The final requirements is making ourselves in- 
telligible to the Martians. Can two races with 
widely different languages devise some means of 
mutual understanding? Some time ago a Yankee 
and a Chinaman whose only means of communica- 
tion was a telephone line tried to work out a code 
by which they could understand each other. 
When starting, neither knew a word of the other's 
language. After several month's efforts they gave 
it up without having made a bit of progress. How 
much more difficult would it be to work out an 
interplanetary code between Mars and the Earth? 

Summing all up we find that with our limita- 
tions, at least at present, to Mars or Venus, the 
uncertainty of an intelligent inhabitant there, the 
difficulty of securing an adequate medium of trans- 
mission, and finally the establishment of an inter- 
planetary code, our chances of striking up Mar- 
tian acquaintances are slim indeed. 

CHARLES SMITH '24. 

THE LADY AND THE SCARLET FAN 

Claire Hammond spent most of his time out of 
office hours at his club. Discussions among business 
men and the reading of newspapers and business 
journals formed ample diversion for him. Enter- 
tainment of the lighter social nature, that is, 
ladies, love, theaters and parties, found little wel- 
come in his grave life's routine. It might be said 
that Claire Hammond lived a colorless existence. 
The sun had already risen every morning when he 
rang for his solemn servant to pull up the shade 
in his room. Breakfast was served in the dining 
room of the lonesome mansion — a dining-room, 
heavy with rich mahogany furniture, ancient sil- 
ver, oriental rugs and draperies. The outlook 
from the dining-room windows was not, however, 
too unattractive. It was woody and mossy, and 
stony and gloomy — but in the spring the violets 
sprang up there and the birds sang there, and in 
the winter snow-birds came. Only the sun sel- 
dom sent any of his beams to lurk there, and even 
if he had, Claire Hammond would not have ap- 
preciated it. His mind never noticed anything be- 
yond his immediate occupation, and that, at break- 
fast-time was centered about fruit, rolls and cof- 
fee, served on a silver service by his solemn ser- 
vant. 

This breakfast ceremony took place every 
morning, promptly at nine and lasted until the 
clock on the stairway boomed nine-thirty. Claire 
Hammond alwavs took a final sip of coffee at this 
signal, rose deliberately and walked to the living- 
room. He he was met by his solemn servant who 
extended to him his coat, hat, gloves and cane and 
escorted him to the door. 



Promptly at ten o'clock, he reached his office, 
where his stenographer was already busily en- 
gaged. His stenographer fitted in well with the 
rest of his office appointments. Her 1 air was 
black as the black oak furniture, and lier person- 
ality was quiet and gray as the atmosphere of 
the office. As far as Hammond was concerned, 
she was an ideal stenographer. She returned his 
formal "Good morning" with a nod and resumed 
her work. 

Hammond directed himself to his mail and later 
became thoroughly engrossed in his office routine. 
When he finished his work it was already late in 
the afternoon and his stenographer had left. He 
adjusted his papers, looked at his watch and de- 
cided to go to his club for dinner. His meal- 
hours, though peculiar, were regular — breakfast 
at nine, dinner at six, and supper at eleven. 

This is a summary of Hammond's daily exis- 
tence, but on the evening fo October 30th, Hal- 
lowe'en night of the year 1918, his quiet evening 
was broken by the preparation for the Hallowe'en 
Ball. He was a trifle annoyed at this occurrence, 
* but one of his business friends persuaded him in- 
to an agreeable attitude and be a spectator. The 
club-room was gorgeously decorated, the cos- 
tumes were exquisite and the music was excellent. 
The ball had been in progress an hour, when, on 
the stair-way entrance to the room appeared a 
feminine figure in a gorgeous scarlet and black 
costume. A scarlet fan, attached to a striking 
bracelet of brilliant ruby jewels, which seemed 
to sparkle and flash fire, hung from her wrist. 
Her escort was masked and was unrecognizable 
to any of the club-members. The lady tripped 
Jiorhtly down the stair-case, flaming in scarlet — an 
indescribable shade of scarlet, an almost tangible, 
fierv color which seemed to strike the eye with a 
live force. If it would have been a trifle stronger, 
it would have been repulsive. As it was, it was 
overwhelmingly attractive. Her feet were black- 
clad. Her hair was raven black and arranged in 
a simple coiffure of coronet' braids. The contour 
of the head was maintained and it was a remark- 
ablv well-shaped head. 

Many eyes followed the flashing fi>ure in scar- 
let, but she seemed elusive. She flitted like a bird, 
poised, for a moment and flitted again in her es- 
cort's arms. 

Twelve o'clock brought a shower of confetti 
and streamers. Every one was entangled in bril- 
liant-colored paper strings. The waltz continued. 
The lierhts were dimmed and couples moved on 
in semi-darkness. 

The lights flickered. Masks were removed and 
people became recognizable. All eyes looked for 
the scarlet figure. 

It had disappeared. 

Claire, too, from his position on one of the side 
balconies, had watched the scarlet figure. It had 
startled him on its first appearance, and had 
drawn his eves irresistably the entire evening. He 
had lost sight of it. however, during the waltz in 
the darkness, for although at times a flame seem- 
ed to strike his eye, it did not leave a path to be 

And now it had disappeared! It had been a 



216 



THE CRUCIBLE 



bright gleam in his gray mind. Was it real? 
Could he pursue it? 

He rose quickly, bade "good-night" to the 
group and hastened out to his car. 

That night he slept badly. The gleaming figure 
appeared. He reached for it. It was gone ! 

It was the last day of the old year and the 
group of the Narcissus Club members planned 
a stag party to the theater. Claire Hammond 
joined them after some persuasion. It was a gala 
theatrical night — this last night of the old year, 
the women's gowns and jewels were rich and 
precious. As Claire glanced up from his pro- 
gramme a short time after his entrance to the 
theater, his eye fell directly upon the lady of the 
group of the first box. He leaned forward sud- 
denly, for he spied a flashing ruby circlet about 
the arm of the lady. He looked a moment long- 
er. Yes, — there it was! The scarlet fan! 

He strained his eyes in the direction of the first 
box. He hoped the lady would turn her head. 
But no ! All that he could see was that the woman 
wore a rich, black velvet gown, handsomely 
fashioned and that her black hair was arranged 
in a coronet coiffure. 

Sometimes the fan fluttered and then the ruby 
lights danced. Sometimes the lady turned her 
head a trifle — but not enough to expose her pro- 
file. The rest of the box party was unknown to 
Hammond. 

When the play was over, Hammond's hopes 
soared. Surely, she must look out once upon the 
audience. 

She rose ! 

Her escort lifted her cloak and placed it about 
her. 

She turned her back and was gone ! 

With the New Year Hammond's duties became 
still heavier. He engrossed himself in his work 
and forced more work upon his competent steno- 
grapher. She was ever-dependable and he re- 
lied upon her implicitly. Suggestions which she 
made startled him ; they exhibited remarkable in- 
sight into affairs. , But she was just an appoint- 
ment of his office. 

His life was still dull and gray. The scarlet 
fan and rubies were quite forgotten. Then, one 
June morning, he was eating breakfast in his dis- 
mal dining-room when he heard a light swish in 
the direction of the window. He looked up and 
saw a scarlet tanager poise on the ledge a second, 
look directly at him and flit away. Hammond 
waited very auietly a few moments, hoping it 
would return. But it was gone ! It had appear- 
ed and disappeared as quickly and lightly as the 
owner of the scarlet fan. 

The clock boomed the half-hour and Hammond 
rose from the table. His solemn servant handed 
him his hat and cane and he set out for his of- 
fice. 

When he reached the office he found that his 
stenographer had not yet arrived. This tardiness 
was unprecedented and the fact irritated him, es- 
pecially when he thought of his unsorted mail. 
There was nothing left for him to do, but sort 
it himself. A long, narrow box confronted him 
with the usual pile of letters. He did not glance 



at the name or address, but tore off the wrapper 
and opened the box. 

In it was the scarlet fan ! 

Hammond started back and then leaned for- 
ward to touch it. He looked hurriedly around 
the room and lifted the box. Trembling a trifle 
he pulled open the second drawer of his desk 
and placed the box in it. 

He slid the drawer shut and turned to the rest 
of his mail. But he didn't remember a word of 
what he read. The sheets seemed to be hidden 
by a scarlet fan and the ruby jewels blinded him. 
In desperation he rose from his desk and seized his 
hat and cane. 

The telephone rang. 

He answered. 

"Mr. Hammond's office?", inquired a woman's 
voice over the telephone. 

"Yes, this is Mr. Hammond speaking", he re- 
plied crisply. 

"Miss Deland will not be able to be at her work 
on account of illness. She will be at the office to- 
morrow as usual." 

"Thank you," answered Hammond shortly and 
hung up the receiver. 

He left his office and wandered down to his 
club. No one was there and the fact irritated 
him. He needed someone to whom he could 
talk. That scarlet fan could not be forgotten. 
It fluttered in his mind and the jewels gleamed. 
Then an awful thought struck his mind. What 
should he do with it? For the present it was 
safe, but it could not remain there forever. 

All that day and night the thought of the scar- 
let fan literally haunted him. The next morning 
he set out for his office in an indescribable frame 
of mind. 

His stenographer was there. His mail was 
sorted. Everything was as usual except for what 
he knew was hidden in his second desk-drawer. 
He sat down uncomfortably in his chair and reach- 
ed toward the second drawer. He opened it a 
trifle, gained courage and drew it open all the way. 

The fan was gone ! 

Was he mad? Or had he really received the 
scarlet fan yesterday? If, where was it? Could 
his stenographer have seen it? 

He dared to ask no questions. She would think 
him crazy. He looked up. She was standing at 
his side. Her big, black eyes seemed to smile 
down upon him in a friendly way. Did she guess 
he was annoyed about something? What a won- 
derful complexion she had ! He stared quite fix- 
edly. Did her cheeks become scarlet or was it 
part of his scarlet-flooded imagination? His eyes 
scanned the high forehead and fell upon the 
raven-black hair. It would make a wonderful 
coronet coiffure. 

While these thoughts rushed through his head, 
she had returned to her desk without the mail, 
which she perceived was as yet unread. 

Then Hammond did an extradordinary thing. 
He leaned forward and pulled his waste-paper 
basket from under his desk. He reached for a 
torn white wrapper. He read and was satisfied. 
He walked over to his stenographer and said, 

"Miss Deland, will you take dinner with me 
this evening?" and he added hesitatingly, "Won't 



THE CRUCIBLE 



217 



you wear the black velvet gown and the bracelet 
to which is attached the Scarlet Fan?" 

She smiled "Yes" for she saw in his hand a 
crumpled wrapper with Bailey, Banks and Bid- 
die seal which was addressed to 

Miss Lenore Deland, 

The Wharton Building, 

New York City. 
CJo Mr. Claire Hammond. 
And from that time on, whenever the Scarlet 
Fan needed to be repaired, Bailey, Banks and 
Biddle returned it directly to Mr. Claire Ham- 
mond. 

—MISS CHRISTINE HAPPEL, '21. 

FIT'S HONEST VERDICT 
VIII. My First College Debate 

My English perfesser said that he wanted me 
to take the affirmative side to the debate that I 
spoke of before, so here it is. If you know how 
to make it better before next Friday night I will 
be mighty glad. 

Rezolved that folding beds are a detriment to 
this grate land of ours. Now honerable debaters, 
and otherwise, this is a very grate subject even 
if it may sound small and I want you as well as 
the govermint to know that I have no use for 
a folding bed. Now I know you will say that 
when house room is so scearce that they are in 
grate need of being used to save valuable space, 
but I want to tell you that there are other things 
worth more than space. 

My pints are based on the constitooshen of our 
grate nation whereby every man is given life, lib- 
erty and the pursoot of happiness. Now the in- 
venshun of the folding bed has been a violashun 
of our American Independents from first to last. 

Pint 1st. Because many a man's life has been 
untimely cut short without due notice by said 
deadly invenshun. Therefour it does not make 
ones life last longer, and again scints folding beds 
cannot get fresh air in the daytime they shorten 
life by making ones health in grave danger ( which 
means in danger of the grave) . 

Pint 2nd. Because many a man's liberty has 
been taken away by sleeping in a folding bed, for 
if it didn't kill him outright when it folded it made 
him a prisoner until death (unless found) which is 
worser. 

Pint 3rd. Because many a man has been de- 
prived of his pursoot of happiness by the bugs and 
varmints who hid in the darkness of his folding 
bed but who would be afraid to show themselves 
on an open bed. 

An now to the last pint! I want to prove that 
the argyment about a folding bed savin room will 
crumble into dust befour I am through. Now if 
necessity is the mother of invenshun then the trun- 
nel bed is an invenshun that will close like a clamb 
every dissentin mouth. But O ! you say. There 
only for babies. So is a baby carriage ; but I guess 
you could make them big enough for grown ups if 
society denanded it. Now if room is as scearce as 
I believe you'll try to prove, then I say with a 
pounded fist and a stomped foot and all my Am- 
erican patriotic zeal that in order to save space 
an no longer violate the constitooshen of this grate 



land, society begs the trunnel bed to replace the 
death-trap. 

Next time I'll expose how college student's 
study. 

DAVID FIT. 

SPRINGTIME 

The vernal tide has brought delight, 
And set each creature's heart a-glowing, 
In sylvan shade and sunny glade, 
The fragrant flowers of Spring are blowing. 

O! Hark! O! Hear! How sweet and clear! 
The songster's in the woodland trilling, 
How 'mid the flowers and leafy bowers, 
Their tales of love each heart are thrilling! 

O blessings lie 'neath every sky, 
And joy is found in every season, 
But fairer far than sun or star, 
Are vernal hopes that bring fruition. 

—JUDGE EMERSON, '23. 

AN L. V. FABLE 

ONCE Upon a time 
THERE was 
AN Aristocrat. 
OFT HE WAS seen 
ON THE campus 
. AT L. V. C. 
IT WAS a 
VERY familiar 
SIGHT 
TO SEE him 
PARADING 
To and fro. 
SOMETIMES taking 
HIS time 
BUT usually 
GOING HIS best. 
ALL HE lacked 
Was humanity 
AND wings, 
FOR HE was 
ONLY REX. 
HOW LIKE him 
ARE ALL the 
FOLKS 
WHO chase 
THE birds 
THEY KNOW they 
CAN'T CATCH! 

— C. W. HISER, '22. 

Drink Postum. "There's a reason." 
Drink Home Brew. "There's a reason." 

— Ex. 

Advertisement: Here's a book that will do 
half your work for you. 

Freshman : All right, give me two. 

— Ex. 

Father: What do you expect to be when you 
are of age, my son? 

Small son : Twenty-one. 

—Ex. 



218 



THE CRUCIBLE 



GLEE CLUB 

With eighteen concerts already presented and 
one more to be given, the Men's Glee Club can 
rightly lay claim to having had an unusually brill- 
iant and highly successful season. By its popular 
and pleasing program it has upheld the reputa- 
tion made by previous clubs and by the gentle- 
manly conduct of its members it has maintained 
the standard and traditions of its Alma Mater. 
Perhaps it can be said to have bettered the reputa- 
tion of Lebanon Valley glee clubs for one auditor, 
who holds a high office in the United Brethren 
church and who has been a delightful listener to 
Lebanon Valley concerts for a number of years, 
declared this year's program to have been the 
best presented by a Lebanon Valley Club in five 
years. Two other pastors who entertained the 
Club affirmed it to have been the best program 
ever given by Lebanon Valley Club. 

The program which thus proved so attractive 
and popular was a varied, and yet well-balanced 
one, and to the director, Prof. Ray Porter Camp- 
bell, who arranged the program and trained the 
Club to present it properly, is due a large measure 
of the Club's success. No little credit goes also 
to Prof. T. Bayard Beatty of the English Depart- 
ment, who coached the two sketches, which every- 
where elicited favorable comment. 

The final tour of the Club took place April 14- 
24 and included Harrisburg, Dillsburg, Millers- 
burg, Shamokin, Mt. Carmel, Tremont and Eiiza- 
bethville. The tour was a complete triumph for 
the Club, as its concert was appreciated and 
lauded everywhere. Mt. Carmel had never had 
a concert by a Lebanon Valley Club before and it 
was up to the Club to make a name there; it did. 
Dillsburg, Tremont and Elizabethville had not 
heard concerts by the Club for several years but 
they were delierhted with the work of the gleers. 
Harrisburg, Millersburg and Shamokin are annual 
stands and will continue to be such if the apprecia- 
tion manifested can be considered an augury. In 
Shamokin, his home town Prof. Campbell enter- 
tained the club at a party following the concert, 
and the affair was a source of enjoyment and de- 
light to every member of the Club, not only be- 
cause of the pretty and charming girls which the 
professor selected but also because of the de- 
licious eats which he and his helpmate (to-be) 
dispensed. 

The Club will conclude its season on Tuesday 
evening, May 10, when it will present in the col- 
lege chapel its program without charge for the 
benefit of the college Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation. 

The last assemblage of the 1921 Club will take 
place in the Berkshire Hotel in Reading on Friday 
evening 1 . May 27, when the members of the Club 
and their fair friends will partake of their annual 
banquet, hear toasts, award pins and bid farewell 
to six members of the Club, who graduate this 
year, Messrs. Farrell, Spessard, Cretzinger, 
Daugherty, Sherk and Nitrauer. 

Prof. : I suppose your father will be all un- 
strung when he hears your grades? 
Senior: No, I wired him last night. 

—Ex. 



ATHLETICS 

After a trip to the central part of the state, 
where they played Juniata, Bucknell and Penn 
State, the record of the Blue and White diamond 
squad stands thus: Won, 2; lost, 3; percentage, 
.400. 

This is one instance, however, of the failure of 
the percentage to indicate properly the playing 
ability of the team, for of the three games lost two 
were lost by a margin of only one run, while the 
third, that against Penn State, was lost by only 
three runs. It is not really the fast playing or 
hitting of the team which has made all of the 
games so far this season close ones, but the su- 
perb pitching of the two southpaws, Walter Wolf 
and Leon Witmer. To date Witmer has pitched 
two games, winning one of them, while Wolf has 
been followed by hard luck and has lost two of 
three which he twirled. Let the Bucknell game 
of April 22 serve as an instance of Leon's hard 
luck. The first man to face him hit a home run; 
after that Bucknell got but one hit off Witmer's 
delivery, but won withal because that home run 
was the only tally of the entire game. 

Both pitchers have been hard put because of 
weak offensive behind them. As a fielding team 
Coach Kelchner's aggregation has shown up 
splendidly; their support has been all that could 
be desired 'by any moundsman. But in the 
striking line, their value is low, although inten- 
sive batting practice under "Pop" Kelchner's tute- 
lage is expected to improve that end of the game. 

On April 21, Captain Moore's men met Juniata 
on the diamond at Huntingdon and left that place 
for Bucknell with a victory tucked under their 
arms, the score having been 6 to 2, Wolf allowed 
the Huntingdon boys but four bingles, while he 
himelf and Cohen, Matchton and Homan did some 
heavv stickwork to account for L. V.'s six counters. 
Wolf in this game performed the feat of striking 
out sixteen men. 

The next day the team met with a 1 to re- 
verse at Bucknell in the manner hereinbefore de- 
scribed. The Blue and White representatives 
outhit and outfielded the Lewisburgians but their 
hits were wasted. Witmer tried to duplicate 
Wolf's deed of the day before, but amassed only 
thirteen trike-outs. 

Penn State on the 23rd gave Kelchner's pro- 
teges the worst beating they have received this 
year — and that was not so bad, only 3 to 0. Mel- 
linger, the State flinger, was the chief obstacle to 
the visitors; they couldn't nick his shoots at the 
proper time and emerged from the fray scoreless, 
although with three hits in their "H" column. 
Wolf twirled winning ball and held the hard-hit- 
tincr Nittany Lions to only six singles. 

Rain caused the cancellation of the first home 
game of the season which was to have been play- 
ed on the college athletic field at A*nville on Fri- 
day, April 29. Consequently the first opportunity 
for the students to witness their players in real 
action comes May Day, Saturday, May 7, when 

Bucknell plays a return game. 

* * * * 

Baseball is not the all-engrossing athletic at- 
traction at Lebanon Valley these days. There is 
scarcely a sunny day that does not find all of 



THE CRUCIBLE 



219 



the tennis courts in use, especially in leisure hours. 
And during all the playing on the courts there has 
been developing a tennis team, the real stars of the 
institution being brought to light and to the atten- 
tion of Coach David Fink. Owing to rain during 
the early days of May, the students' tournament, 
arranged for the purpose of selecting the best 
material for the team, has not been carried out 
so that positions are not yet filled for the initial 
tournament which will take place with the Juniata 
College team on the Lebanon Valley courts on the 
morning of May Day, May 7. Among those who 
are candidates for the team are: Moore, R. Stab- 
Jev. E. Stabley, Glick, W. Wolfe, Garland, Hynson, 
Fields, Stauffer, and Herr. Two other games are 
on the season's schedule, May 20, Drexel at Phila- 
delnhia, and May 21, Moravian at Bethlehem. 

Everv day also finds track candidates training 
for various events on the campus or athletic field. 
The track team has no schedule but will be repre- 
sented in the inter-collegiate track meet at Harris- 
burg- on Monday, May 30. There are numerous 
candidates for the various positions and a repre- 
sentative track team is anticipated. 

JOKES 
How Many? 

He : Every time I kiss you it tends to make me 
a better man. 

She : Oh — you angel. 

— Ex. 

Nature Lovers 

She : Isn't Mary Lovely? 

He : Who told you about her? 

When The Glee Club Goes Away 

Yes. we meet but then we miss them, 
There are now some vacant chairs; 

We will linger there to miss them, 

When we form the Wednesday evening pairs. 

Pleasant Mistake 

"When William got a letter this morning, he 
frowned and said that he supposed it was another 
of those notes from his mother beginning, 'Billy, 
don't.' " 

"Was it," 

"no, it was a billet-doux." — Exchange. 

The Way It Really Is 

I used to think I knew I knew, 

But now I must confess; 
The more I know I know I know, 

I know I know the less. 

— Exchange. 

There was a Prof, in our school 

And he was wondrous wise, 
Our grades he ranged in columns 

From E's and F's to I's. 

There was a smart boy in our school, 
Who thought he knew more than the rule; 

But, when neat and prim, 

He sat under Grimm, 
He learned he was only a— n ordinary fellow. 



In An "Education" Test 

The spirit is willing, but the line is weak. 

Carl Hiser — I feel all unstrung. 

Freshman — Why, did the string break? 

Yes, I was a Freshman, too — in fact, some of 
the happiest years of my life, I spent as a Fresh- 
man. — Exchange. 

As of others will remind us, 

We can make our grades sublime; 
If in a test, to the Professors 

We can give a "right, good line." 

(A super-fat man had just passed.) 
Agnes: — Isn't he cute? 
Kathrin: — Cute? What do you call cute. 
Agnes (blushing) : — Why, "Fat", of course. 

Prof. Haring : When a tennis ball hits the girls' 
heads it never hurts them because there are so 
many waves there. 

Co-ed : Better the waves than the beach, Prof. 

Farrell : Mose, you can surely hold your own. 

Mose (Looking at his arms reminiscently) I've 
never held my own yet, but I've held lots of other 
people's. 

"Ivy, why don't you cling to me?" 
"I will ; I think you're a brick." 

—Ex. 

May I hold your Palm Olive? 
Not on your Life Buoy. 

— Punch Bowl. 

"I hope you miss me, dear," he sighed, 
"And be as lonesome as can be." 
"And when you come back," she sweetly said, 
"I hope you Mrs. me." 

— Ex. 

Irate Customer: See here, waiter, I found a 
button in the salad. 

Waiter: Well sir, that's just part of the dress- 



Senior: I'm so broke I can't even pay atten- 
tion. 

—Ex. 



Fordham Law School 

Woolworth Building 

Co-educational 

CASE SYSTEM 
THREE-YEAR COURSE 

AFTERNOON CLASS 
EVENING CLASS 

Write for Catalog "V" 

CHARLES P. DAVIS, Registrar, 
Woolworth Building' 
NEW YORK CITY 



i»i What Is Research? 



SUPPOSE that a stove burns too much coal for the amount of 
heat that it radiates. The manufacturer hires a man familiar 
with the principles of combustion and heat radiation to make 
experiments which will indicate desirable changes in design. The stove 
selected as the most efficient is the result of research. 

Suppose that you want to make a ruby in a factory— not a mere 
imitation, but a real ruby, indistinguishable by any chemical or 
physical test from the natural stone. You begin by analyzing rubies 
chemically and physically. Then you try to make rubies just as 
nature did, with the same chemicals and under similar conditions. 
Your rubies are the result of research — research of a different type 
from that required to improve the stove. 

Suppose, as you melted up your chemicals to produce rubies and 
experimented with high temperatures, you began to wonder how hot 
the earth must have been millions of years ago when rubies were first 
crystallized, and what were the forces at play that made this planet 
what it is. You begin an investigation that leads you far from rubies 
and causes you to formulate theories to explain how the earth, and, 
for that matter, how the whole solar system was created. That would 
be research of a still different type — pioneering into the unknown to 
satisfy an insatiable curiosity. 

Research of all three types is conducted in the Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company. But it is the third type of research — 
pioneering into the unknown — that means most, in the long run, even 
though it is undertaken with no practical benefit in view. 

At the present time, for example, the Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company are exploring matter with X-rays in order 
to discover not only how the atoms in different substances are ar- 
ranged but how the atoms themselves are built up. The more you 
know about a substance, the more you can do with it. Some day this 
X-ray work will enable scientists to answer more definitely than they 
can now the question: Why is iron magnetic? And then the elec- 
trical industry will take a great step forward, and more real progress 
will be made in five years than can be made in a century of experi- 
menting with existing electrical apparatus. 

You can add wings and stories to an old house. But to build a 
new house, you must begin with the foundation. 




THE CRUCIBLE 



Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Snpplies 
Gnitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Mnsic 
Mnsic Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cnmberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 



See the New Styles 

in 




The Shoeman 
•The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 

see 

J. S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F*ei. 



Need a new 

Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and Sporting 
Goods ? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E. M. Hottenstein, Cumb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Q 

U 

A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



QUALITY C 

BURDAN'S r 
ICE V 

CREAM lc 

E 



SERVICE 



£cv?er ^Prices 

Our Entire <§tocl? of (jDoolens 

Try US for yomr 

NEW SUIT 

finest \Ccr^n\ai>s^ip ax\& 
Smartest <bt\jf 



.es 



oWer 



JTcifor, <R epresei\tit\g 35roWt>lt\g, 3*\ii\g ai)cl (Bo. 



HAMMER/MITH 
KORTMEYER (Q 

ARTl/TV, 
ENGRAVERS 
PRINTERS 
M I LVVAUKEB* 
W 1 S\ 



I 1 ill "1^3 I 



<TfW 9 



(Slnn^itf e, a. 

Hirst Ctess M©gals 
With. Mumming W&feir 

3CersSW^ s Superior 

ream 



THE CRUCIBLE 



223 



Lebanon hattery 

EUGENE ERBY 
211 No. 8 St. Lebanon, Pa. 
HatCIeaning, Reblocking 

LADIES' and GENTLEMEN'S 

New Hats and Caps 

Open till 8:30 p. m. 

GRANITINE 
WALL PLASTER 

COMPANY 

B. F. Patschke, Prop. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Granitlne Wall Plaster 

DEALERS IN 

Builders' Supplies 

Truscon Water Proofing Products 
Miners and Shippers of 

Building Sand 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



C. G. Campbell 

Hardware and House 

FURNISHINGS 
43 No. 9th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 



STATIONERY 

PICTURES FRAMES 
KODAKS FINISHING 

Leather Goods 
Lamps and Shades 

HARPEUS 

"YHFGIFT STORE OF LEBANON" 



THE CHARM OF INDIVIDUALITY 
MARKS EVERY PORTRAIT 
Produced by 

The GA TES Studio 
Lebanon, Pa. 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICETED. 



E J. SNAVELY <£ CO 

Sporting Goods 

Athletic Equipment 
Umbrellas, Trunks 
Hand Luggage, and 
Travel lor s 9 Requisites 
MARKET SQUARE 

LEBANON, PA. 



224 T ft E 

MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

€jj For Churches, Colleges, Residences, Theatres, 
Etc. Over three thousand in use. The high- 
est grade instruments. Every organ espec- 
ially designed and built for the place and pur- 
pose for which it is to be used and fully 
guaranteed. Every part made in our own 

factory under personal supervision. Booklets 
and specification on request. 

M. P. MOLLER 

HAGERSTOWN - - MARYLAND 

N. B. — Builder of three manual, electric organ In 
Lebanon Valley College. 



SATISFY YOURSELF 

... EAT — 
Burdan's Ice Cream 

at the 

IDEAL 
RESTAURANT 

The Student's Second Home 

I. H. ROEMIG, Prop. 

LADIES' ROOMS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



CHUCIJ3LE 

J. F. Apple Co. 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 
120 E. Chestnut Street Lancaster, Penna. 

Manufacturers of 

Class and Fraternity Pins 

Rings, Medals, Cups 
Footballs - Basketballs 

Makers or 

1922, L. V. C. CLASS JEWELRY 

High Grade Chocolates 

Maillard's of New York 
APOLLO and REYMER'S 
Fancy Gift Packages A Specialty 

In 1 /2» 1 , 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds 

Various High Grade Confections Always Fresh 
The Store with the Candy with the Snap 

SHOTTS 

127 N. 9th ST. LEBANON, PA. 

Bel 2 7- J 



Jacob Sargent 
Merchant Tailor 

READY-TO-WEAR 

CLOTHING 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


W 7VY Rohland 

Fresh land Smoked Meats 
Poultry, Milk, Butter 

3 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


Remodeled Refurnished 
European Plan Rooms $1.50 

Hotel Walton 

Fred Ehrhorn, Proprietor 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Rooms With Bath 

Ivebanon, Pa 


Miss L. A. Krum 

Millinery 

And 

Exclusive Shop for Women 

119 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Harvey L. Seltzer 
One Price Clothier 

And 

Men's Furnishings 

The House of Good Values 
769 Cumberland Street, 

Lebanon Pa 


Fink's Bakery 

UeST DdKeu riOQUCTS 

You Pay for the Articles. 

Quality and Service Cost You 
Nothing ! 


Students 

Do You Want 

Pnnm PiirtiichiflOTQ 
1TUU111 rUllllMinigs 

Sporting Goods 

H Milieu- 

ANNVILLE, PA 


Quality Service 

Full line of groceries 
Fresh candies 
All fruit in season 
Pretzels, cakes, crackers 
Cigars and Cigarettes 

A. S. Hostetter 

217 E. Main street, Annvillo, Pa. 
Both Phones Prompt Service 



"The Live Store" "Always Reliable" 

The Store Everybody Is 
Talking About 

Everything Is Greatly Reduced at 

DOUTRICHS 

We Can Sell You 

Guaranteed Clothes 

That Will Give You Satisfaction 

or 

Refund Your Money 

This is the Harrisburg Home 

of 

Hart, Schaffner and Marx; 

and 

Kuppenheimer Society Brand Clothes 
304 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Penna. 

Press of Holzapfel Publishing Company, Cleoaa. Pa 



JUNE 10, 1921 




Commencement Number 



The Finest Things in College 
Creations Come From 

The 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Students 9 Headquarters 

Pennants, Cushion Tops, Literature 

Stationery, Novelties 
"The Official Blue and White Shop" 



$1.00 a Week 

WILL MAKE YOU A MEMBER OF OUR 

Watch and Diamond 

CLUB 
The P. H. Caplan Co. 

The Different Kind of Jewelry Store 

206 Market Street 

Harrlsburg, Pa. 



H. J, COLOVIRAS C. S. DIAMOND 

Manufacturers 

OF ALL KINDS OF HIGH GRADE 
CHOCOLATES, BON BONS 9 
CARAMELS, ETC 

SWEET LAND 

Light Lunches, 
Ice Cream and Sodas 

LARGEST AND MOST MAGNIF- 
ICENT ICE CREAM PAR- 
LOR IN CENTRAL PA. 

331 Market Street 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



225 



Pianos Player Pianos Victrolas 

Victor Records Victor Snpplies 
Gnitars Violins Banjos 

Ukeleles Sheet Mnsic 
Mnsic Books and Bags 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



COME ! 



See the New Styles 

in 




The Shoeman 
•'The Home of Good Shoes" 

847 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



For Swell 

Young Men's Clothing 
and 

A Square Deal to All 

see 

J. S. Bashore 

Lebanon, F*ei. 



Need et new 

Trunk, Bag, Suit Case, Travelling Case 
Leather Goods, Bicycle, and Sporting 
Goods? We carry a fine line. 

Price Right Quality Right 
E. M. Hottenstein, Climb. St., Lebanon, Pa. 



226 



THE CRUCIBLE 



The House of Service and Both Phones 



SPECIAL LOW PRICES. 

Smith & Bowman 

Carpets, Rugs, Matting, Draperies, 
and Fixtures* 
Come and look over our large 
variety of Household Goods 
758 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon Pa. 


Ask for Simon P. FEGAjN 

Soft Drinks 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Simon . FEGAN 

536 North 8th Street 

LEBANON, PA. 


/\nnviiie 
National Bank 
Annville, Pa. 

Surplus and 

Undivided Profits, - - : - $175,000 


"Say it with FLOWERS', 

The Flower Shop 

19 • 21 ISorth Eighth Street 

J. L. Bernstein, Prop. 

NURSERIES 
Front <£ maple Sts Lebanon, Pa. 
Bell Phone 


z\ to s&& our 

Students' Special 

Photographs 

Blazier's Studio 

839 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PAo 


All-American 

MOYER'S 

Restaurant 

Eighth £ Willow Streets 

Lebanon, Pa. 


College Men 

WITH 

"PUNCH ' ■- "PEP" 
"PERSONALITY" 

What do you intend to do this vacation? 
Your opportunity to make BIG MONEY. We 
will teach you the business, and you earn 
while learning. Business honest, clean and 
dignified. For particulars call or write: 
FRANK S. FITE, 
204-205 Yoffee Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 


John H. Hull 

The Harley-Davidson Agent 
Forge St Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENN. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



227 



IXewgard & Tice 

Coal and Feed 

Dealers 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



A. S. CRAUMER'S 

"Store For Men" 

C. F. HILL, Mgr. 

HATS SHIRTS HOSIERY 

TRUNKS UMBRELLAS 
SWEATERS PURSES UNDERWEAR 

777 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



Harry Zimmerman, 



d ds W. R. WALTZ 



DENTAL PARLORS 



72 West Main St. 



Annville, Penna. 



Others Fix Them— We Rebuild and Reweid Them 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
SHOES BUILT FOR DEFORMED FEET 

Save Money by Seeing 

DETWEILER 

The Leading Cobbler and Shoe 
Builder of Annville 
13 EAST MAIN STREET 



BARBER SHOP 

West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



BRUNSWICK 

PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

TONE! TONE! TONE! 

That's the Keynote of Brunswick Quality 
See if you can find the Equal of Brunswick Tone 
HEAR! THEN COMPARE 
PRICES, $125.00 to $750.00 

REGAL UMBRELLA CO. 

2nd 9 Walnut Streets HARRISBURG, PA. 



J. R. MOYER 

The Up-to-date Grocer for Good Things to Eat 

Candies, Fruits, Nuts, 

Cakes, Tobacco 
Oysters and Fish in Season 



E. Main Street 



Annville, Pa, 



D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Dealers in 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



228 


THE CRUCIBLE 




In stock now, and 


Young Men and Women 


Our college 


Coming through 


Who Demand Smart Footwear 


v^nenxeie. 


Daily. Low shoes 


Go to the 




For young men and 


WALK -OVER 


Grain in heavy 


Women, designed 


Stitched models. 


By this shop 


226 Market Street 


Your inspection 


Particularly for 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Invited. 



Lower Prices 

For Reliably Made Clothes 

You Can Now Buy That Hart, Schaffner <Sc Marx, or Society Brand 

Suit or Overcoat at Big Savings 

Cost You No More Than Ordinary Clothes 

Manufacturers' Clothing Company 

Lebanon's Most Dependable Clothiers 

725 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

For Reliable Clothing See 

Lawn Bros. 
Tailors and Clothiers 

812-814 Willow Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



Tin 




1 



Volume IX Annville, Pa., Friday, June 10, 1921 No. 14 



Editor-in-Chief 

R. RHODES STABLEY, '22. 

Associate Editors 

CARL W. HISER, '22. 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22. 
JOSEPHINE HERSHEY, '22. 

Literary Editors 

MAE REEVES, '23. 
LUCILE SHENK, '23. 

Activity Editors 

PEARL SEITZ, '22. 
HEBER MUTCH, '23. 

Athletic Editors 

HAROLD LUTZ, '23. 
GEORGE HOHL, '23. 



Business Manager 

E. GASTON VANDENBOSCHE, '22. 

Assistant Business Managers 

J. DWIGHT DAUGHERTY, '22. 
ROBERT W. LUTZ, '23. 

Freshmen Representatives 
Editorial Staff 

ELSIE BROWN 
CYNTHIA DRUMMOND 
MARYAN MATUSZAK 
CHARLES SMITH 
MARY YINGER 

Business Staff 

DONALD EVANS 
RALPH MARTIN 



Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 
15c each. Address all communications to E. G. 
Vandenbosche, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Penna. Please notify in case of change in address 
or if you fail to receive your copy. 



The editors will be pleased to receive articles on 
any subject from professors, students or Alumni of 
the Seminary. 

Entered at the Annville Post Office as second 
class matter. 



EDITORIAL 
How Best Spend Vacation 

Our school year is fast drawing to a close. It 
has been a year of delightful associations and of 
profitable schoolwork. We are saddened when 
we think that in a few weeks we will be leav- 
ing these halls for our homes and perchance, 
various places of employment. Our happy times, 
friendships and work are ended for a short 
period. 

But our superiors, the worthy Seniors, have 
completed their course and must take their places 
elsewhere in this busy world. They have had their 
round of hard, earnest work ; they have won their 
laurels; and they have enjoyed the social ad- 
vantages of their school. So as they go out from 
us, we extend our heartiest and sincerest wishes 
for their success in the future. 

All, therefore, look forward eagerly to the 
months ahead for all will have a recreative period, 
indeed, and the question awaiting a decision, is 
"How ought we best spend our vacation?" 

After a year of school work one feels the need 
of a vacation. The summer vacation is the time 
to build up new physical power and force, as well 
as mental reserve. Strong minds and vigorous 
bodies enable us to perform fitly the tasks and 
duties which naturally arise each day. No vaca- 
tion is well-spent which does not recreate us in 
body, mind and spirit. 

Then, too, the vacation period is a splendid 
time to earn money to pay school bills for the 



ensuing year. This may not be a need at all, 
yet the dignity of labor gives appreciation and 
grace to the soul. Some institutions lessen their 
school year to enable many of their students to 
work in order to further their education. 

Another good way to spend vacation is to be- 
come a "booster" for our school. All of us will 
come in contact with undergraduates among our 
acquaintances, many graduating from our re- 
spective high schools and we ought to introduce 
them to Lebanon Valley College. We should ac- 
quaint them, too, with the standard of our school, 
see that they meet the members of our faculty; 
we should go over the variety of courses with them 
and show them the equipment in the various de- 
partments; in other works, show them how all 
departments are so organized as to give to the 
student what he or she most desires and needs. 
Such vacation boosting will bring to Lebanon Val- 
ley a large number of new students next fall. It 
is the new student who puts "pep" into the stu- 
dent body and enlivens the organizations each 
year. 

Let each of us return next September with re- 
newed strength and vigor of body and mind to do 
bigger things then ever and help enthusiastically 
to make our college the best and greatest in her 
class and also dedicate our lives to the best prep- 
aration possible. 

May the vacation period bring to us all the pres- 
ent, personal enrichment, the joy of an unselfish 
devotion in behalf of our school, and the glory 
of a vacation well-spent. 



230 



THE CRUCIBLE 



EDITORIAL COMMENTS 

The best wishes of the school follow you, 
Seniors, when you don the cap and gown next 
week and bid a final farewell to the college that 
has claimed four years of your career. You are 
now ready to embark upon the rough voyage of 
life and we wish you Godspeed. Put into prac- 
tice the ideals that the dear old school has striven 
to teach you, never lose sight of the true pur- 
pose of all life and living, and smile! If you 
Seniors, fellows and girls — we should rather say, 
young men and young women — have learned to 
think, to control yourselves and to smile consis- 
tently — you have gotten all that any college edu- 
cation can give. 

Now for some constructive criticism. 

Some of you Seniors have failed. You have 
gone thru four years of college life and you have 
not gotten what you should have taken. You 
have left some of the essentials behind. Oppor- 
tunities have knocked at your door but you were 
too sleepy to get out of bed and let them inside. A 
few of you pursued your studies diligently — from 
behind; you passed by the fraction of a percent 
mixed with a strong solution of feeling and sym- 
pathy on the part of the professors. You can't 
look back on your college days with a great deal 
of pride becvuse you have done very li'tfe A f>w 
more of you, who were good students and have 
class room records to show, missed just half of 
your college opportunities. When you had walked 
out of your classroom and got your compliment 
from the professor, you breathed a sigh of relief 
and self-satisfaction, and there, lo, and behold! 
your activities came to an abrupt end. Your 
motto was "Let the other fellow do it" and we 
congratulate you on the way you lived up to your 
motto. You may have had the school in your 
head but you didn't have the school in your heart. 
You were afraid you might do a little bit more 
than somebody and not be heralded all over the 
campus for your brave deeds. When you did do 
something for your Alma Mater you did it with a 
feeling of reluctancy and had to be pushed and 
led and coaxed and then nutured. Where 
glory didn't flaunt its banners, you were con- 
spicious for your absence. 

Some of you have made good on parade, but 
weren't much when it came to the trenches. A 
few of you were addicted to blowing your own 
horn and it seemed that there was a never end- 
ing amount of steam present somewhere in your 
anatomies. There are some of you who have not 
proven sincere; you have considered friendship 
nothing more than a means to an end. A few 
of you would not bear examination under a char- 
acter X-ray. A few more of you wore out a 
hammer every other week, knocking everything 
and everybody but yourself. You have made 
emeritus grades in gossiping. Again some of you 
did not have the courage of your conviction, ac- 
countable for most of the shortcomings of the 
past year in general and the student governing 
function in particular. 

The above criticism is meant in all kindness. 
We are not trying to knock you, but we want to 
show you to yourselves as you have been seen so 



that you won't depart college with the idea that 
you have "pulled" something over. You know to 
which of the above classes you belong, and you 
alone can remedy your faults. Remember the 
mark of distinction of the real true friend is he 
who points out your deficiencies and failures. 

Yet, upon many things you are to be compli- 
mented. As a whole you have furnished to Leb- 
anon Valley a bunch of clean-cut and honorable 
students and workers. Many of you were at all 
times interested in the college, and your endeav- 
ors, though they may have been of the minor va- 
riety, have not gone unnoticed. Many of you can 
look back with pride upon your college days and 
the future can present no less brilliant a spectacle. 
You have turned out a good "Quittie", likewise a 
splendid "Play" ; you are to be commended for your 
interest in the christian activities of the school 
and the part you have taken in literary society 
work. The three anniversaries this year were not 
of a mediocre character, but they were unique and 
well-prepared. The societies themselves have 
lost much of their brilliance and worth in the reg- 
ular routine of meetings. Of course you are not 
entirely to blame for this condition. Much has 
been said in criticism of the student governing as- 
sociation on both sides of the house, but not all 
of it has been merited when one considers the dif- 
ficulty of the proposition. Our hats are off to 
those of you who have fought it through to the end 
regardless of failure or success. 

Seniors, as you say farewell to dear old Alma 
Mater, Lebanon Valley, next week, remember 
that we the undergraduates are with you one and 
all in a hearty wish for your success. May those 
of you who have done nobly, keep up the good 
work and yours shall be the reward. May those 
of you who have not done so nobly, renew your 
covenant to yourselves and turn over a new chap- 
ter in your history. 

We, Juniors, Sophomores, Freshmen, wish you, 
Seniors, good luck, success, and Godspeed! 

Resume and Outlook of the Y. M. and the Y. W. 

Nothing about our school has been so perfect 
the past year as to merit no criticism and the Y. 
M. and the Y. W. come in for their share of it. 

The activities under the joint or separate direc- 
tion of these organizations were on the whole suc- 
cessful and deserving of praise. The Star Course 
showed a marked improvement both in quality of 
numbers and in management and the May Day 
exercises proved to be something unusual and 
extraordinary under the direction of Miss Adams 
and Prof. Beatty. The various receptions were 
well presented and the week of prayer bore great 
fruits. Surely the fellows in particular can never 
forget the wonderful awakening that occured in 
the dormitory. 

The proposition facing the Y. M. and Y. W. 
is that of maintaining a good attendance at the 
weekly meetings. The Y. M. has not had a suc- 
cessful year in this respect although it, has not 
fallen off from the standards of other years. 
One contributing cause of this condition is the 
fact that there are a number of other regular 
weekly meetings which tend to subtract interest 
from the christian organizations. There seems to 



THE CRUCIBLE 



231 



be no week night, available for this purpose and 
Sunday with its many church services and other 
attractions does not offer an auspicious time for 
these meetings. There may be some way of 
working ourselves out of this dilemma next year. 

A need is felt at this time for separate quarters 
for both organizations in the form of a building. 
For various reasons, it is not advisable to con- 
sider the building project, at the present and the 
idea will have to lie dormant until conditions have 
reached a more static position in the course of 
a few years. Both organizations are without 
doubt greatly handicapped due to the lack of 
proper headquarters and suitable means for con- 
gregating. 

Extensive plans are under way for next year. 
The handbook will be materially improved upon 
and will be put out upon a cooperative basis by 
the two organizations. The Star Course under 
the capable direction of Russel Shadel promises to 
be the best ever given at our college. The town 
of Annville has decided to co-operate and they 
have done so in a magnanimous way, most of 
the tickets for the coming season having been dis- 
posed. The reception to be held at the open- 
ing of the school for the interests of the new 
students is under the direction and sponsorship 
of Mr. Willard and something novel is going to be 
attempted. 

Juniors, Sophomores, Freshmen, the Y. M. and 
Y. W. request your cooperation for the coming 
year. May yours be a happy vacation. 

The Crucible for 1921-22 

The Crucible the past, year has made consider- 
able progress over former years. From a mere 
pamphlet, called the College News, it has jumped 
to a considerable sized college magazine. 
However, there are criticisms too numerous to be 
mentioned concerning our paper which we are 
hoping to eliminate in the near future. 

First of all, a reduction in size will take place 
since the paper as it now stands does not make a 
goojd appearance. The contemplated size is 7 
by 11, the size of the most popular magazines. In 
view of this reduction, an increasexof pages will 
take effect with the result that there will be more 
reading material in proportion to the advertis- 
ing matter. There has been the criticism more or 
less prevalent that the Crucible has been an ad- 
vertising medium. This is a fact, but when you 
consider that the life of the paper depends 
largely upon the support of our merchants and 
dealers, you will criticize mbre leniently. The 
paper will be issued by-monthly as heretofore 
and no increase in subscription rates is contemplat- 
ed. . , , . . 

Secondly, the paper will be divided into sepa- 
rate departments. Editorial, fiction, poetry, athe- 
letics, activities, alumni, jokes and exchanges. 
One of the features of the editorial section will be 
the page of invectives under the title of the "Mir- 
ror" where everything about college will be pic- 
tured as it actually is. Credit will be given 
where credit is due, and criticism will be given 
where such action is called for. Nobody will be 
excluded Members of the faculty, college of- 



ficials, students and organizations will be treated 
alike. Another feature we anticipate is the ap- 
pearance of pictures and photos from time to 
time. 

We can have a good college paper if you say 
so ! 

MY OUTLOOK 

"Oh, sad fate to wander, sad to wander out in 
the wide world" ? Do things merely hap- 
pen? Well, then many accidents must occur be- 
fore the veil of obscurity is annihilated. In the 
first place, I am penniless minus debt. Now some 
heathen genius said, "If I had but two loaves of 
bread I would sell the one and buy flowers to feed 
my soul." Alas! Where is my soul and where 
are my flowers? Will the people strew flowers 
in my path? I am optimistic enough to believe 
that they will, but there will also be just a few 
thistles and other pricks thrown in for good 
measure. I am an advocate of "what we look for 
we find.". If I look forward to teaching school 
as a mechanical process, I'll soon become a 
steam engine and puff all my energy away on the 
little pests in the school-room. My map will soon 
portray innumerable contours, which will lead to 
the paths of downrighteousness and utter destruc- 
tion of a fair young mortal. However if I think I'll 
be a charming success the lines on my face will 
all radiate upward to meet the blessed sunshine 
and glory of this world. Why should people look 
at the ash-heaps and garbage cans when they 
can feast their eyes on the marvelous beauty of 
the ever-changing sky? Neither an optimist nor 
a pessimist will I be, but a melorist. Doubtless, 
you all know what a melorist is, but for the sake 
of par value, I'll explain. A melorist is a per- 
son who sees the thorns and the roses at the same 
time. 

Where am I going to teach and how much 
salary shall I receive? Those trifling questions I 
cannot answer nor do they fret me into a fried 
fritter. I only know I am going out into the surg- 
ing mass of humanity and conquer, not with my 
diploma, but by the aid of God, my friends, and 
my own back-bone. "Course, the child is young 
and does not know the cruel world" my readers 
are thinking in an all wise fashion. But, see here. 
I do know that this moving panorama of a "rag- 
time jazz world" of ours is searching for happi- 
ness. " Some do not find this gift for look at the 
pitiful turned-down mouths the next time you get 
on a train and see the restlessness of the people. 
They are like mere children. They want this toy 
and- that toy. When they get it they break it 
immediately and throw it away. Yes, the writer 
is young and knows not of what she writes* for she 
is no authority on any subject. But one thing I 
do know — that true happiness comes in serving 
others. 

I intend to adapt myself to my environment. 
Don't think I'll become a wall-flower and reveal 
a conventional pattern for, like Sinclair Lewis, I 
do not believe in "village vines." Nevertheless, 
I'll try to see things from an understanding out- 
look of my environment. I'll try to like my work 
better than my salary. It is true that one should 
first fall in love with their work for I read that 



thought somewhere, sometime, from some authori- 
ty. 

What is "My Outlook?" Pardon my egotistical 
manner, but don't you know there is no subject; 
more interesting than self. From my present look- 
out I have one aim, and that one aim I am going to 
hold on and clinch like a crab clinches its prey 
with its pinchers. I will not loosen my grip until I 
have materialized that dream, for why should I let 
my ideals topple over and become lost in the debris 
of this generation? Everyone should try at least 
to be a "Leaning Tower of Pisa." 

My aim is to be a medical missionary. Why 
am I going to take up this work? Because it is 
the biggest work I know. My course will require 
five more years of training. Again, I am optimis- 
tic enough to believe I'll get through. Surely I 
have not found so great a faith in all Israel" — or 
so great stupidity. At the present rate of liv- 
ing it will cost me $800.00 per annum at school. 
By mathematical computation I find that in four 
years at the same rate it will be necessary to pass 
through my hands $3200.00. At the present 
rate of income it will take me until the millenium 
dawns to find this sum. However, suppose I 
have this invisible sum. Imagine in six years 1 

emerge from the University the Doctor 

A. B., M. D. I am educated, a person of deep 
understanding and of profound wisdom. I shall 
render my services to the "sickly few" for 
$1800.00 per year. I am now at the age of 35. 
By further mathematical calculation, I arrive at 
the fact that it will take me until I am 40 years 
of aere to get out of debt. By that time I am 48 
or 50. Barring sickness and accidents, I shall be 
able to purchase a Ford. In this beautiful omn- 
bus I and what is left of mine shall ride around 
and enjoy. 

However, the foregoing recital is somewhat 
overdrawn. Yet, it is not entirely an "ancient 
Roman jest." I do believe this is the only course 
I could follow and feel satisfied in later life. 
Nevertheless, if I find out that the medical work 
is not, my wlork, I'll gyrate until I find the place 
I can do the most good and even if it is a street 
sweeper. 

Make the city beautiful and keep it clean! 
Build thee more stately mansions, oh my soul." 

—MARY E. BORTNER, '21. 

WHAT FOUR YEARS OF ATHLETICS HAVE 
DONE FOR ME 

At the present time when physical training is 
coming into its own in the curriculum of the high 
school, i.t might not. be amiss to give a few remin- 
iscences of my four years of participation in this 
form of activity at Lebanon Valley College. 

During my four years training in this field I 
have partaken of athletics in every form and I 
can honestly say that I have been greatly bene- 
fitted and as yet cannot, say that athletics have 
been a drawback in any way. 

In as brief a manner as possible, I shall try to 
show in what manner I have been helped. 

In the first place, I have been greatly bene- 
fitted in health. My appetite is wonderful, have 
no trouble sleeping and at no time have I been 



CRUCIBLE 

seriously ill. _ Anybody doubting my statement as 
to the appetite and the sleeping need but watch 
the food disappear before a group of athletes or 
try to waken the boys in the morning. 

Then, too, the athlete learns the lesson of co- 
operation and there is seldom any friction be- 
tween the true athletes and the faculty. At every 
turn the athlete is usually willing to cooperate 
and help the school along. 

Mentally an athlete is usually keen after a 
night's practice for he gets plenty of fresh air 
and is refreshed by getting plenty of exercise. 

Then, too, football, basketball, baseball, track, 
or whatever sport it may be tends to cement the 
bonds of friendship among the members of the 
teams which last forever. Sports also tend to de- 
velop a moral courage peculiar to athletics for it 
takes nerve to battle against teams superior in 
many respects to your own. They also tend to 
develop a philosophy of life hard to beat. 

But the benefit I prize most highly is the love 
of the school which athletics have instilled within 
me. I have been privileged to visit many schools 
and no matter how much I enjoy the trip I am 
always glad to get back to Lebanon Valley. Had 
it not been for athletics I would have loved my 
Alma Mater but not in the manner in which I do 
now. 

As I leave the institution which I hold dear, I 
shall always look forward to the time when I can 
come back and pay it a visit and I shall always be 
anxious to read about the school's athletics and 
its progress in other lines. As a parting thought 
I would advise everyone to participate in some 
form of athletics for I think that, it will prove 
of inestimable benefit in later life, not only in the 
manner which I have tried to point out, but in 
many other ways. 

GUY W. MOORE,, '21. 
FIT'S HONEST VERDICT 

Number 9. — How We Study in College 

Mebby you wonder how we study, so in this 
last issue I shall make all plane. We don't study 
like we kids ust to at the old country school house. 
We wore overalls there but here in the boys dor- 
mitory we sumtimes wear even less than that. 
Some boys study in their rooms by day but most 
of them study in the halls at night. It is the cus- 
tom for them to study out loud and sometimes 
I hear em in my sleep sayin you win, or you tell 
em. I guess there spellin or the teacher is givin 
another the chance to tell what he thinks he 
knows. 

My roommate says I dont study none. You see 
I study when he is at class soes I can fool him, then 
when he comes in he finds me studyin pensman- 
shin and he thinks I'm killin time or something. 

There is a lot of studyin goes on around col- 
lege, but most of it is iust to learn how to keep 
from studyin harder. 

They uste to call us schollars at, the little old 
log school house but here they call us students. I 
herd the other day that some college president 
was a grate schollar. I never knowed before that 
Schollars was grate. That, bein' the case I had 
better have stayed in the old log school house for 
there I musta been grate and didn't know it. I. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



233 



thought it was grater to be in college; but some 
of the boys says if I go back to the log school 
house they might make a college president out 
of me. Of course I wouldent mind the job but 
I'd have to buy so many things that I don't have 
an then I'd hafto study mighty hard to keep stayin 
smarter than those under my keeping an care. 

Study is all well an good, but some felloes 
here think that it. spoils ones college to study 
much, and so they diversifigh, as they say, keep- 
in a few books on hand to keep up appearances. 
They say if you no it anyways whats the use 
of readin it. Well I from experients don't be- 
lieve you can know too much of it, so to use the 
words of the grate and immortal George Wash- 
ington, I care not what others may choose but 
as for me give me study or give me no branes. 
Study may be named as one of the few and rare 
virtuse of the boys' dormitory which I described 
before. Goodby, at least until next year. 
Ever the same, 

DAVID FIT. 

A CRUCIBLE BRINGS FORTH "THE CRUCIBLE" 

If you can imagine an army winning victories 
without guns, a carpenter erecting buildings 
without, a hammer, a farmer raising crops without 
a plow or a writer producing best sellers without 
a pen or typewriter, then you can perhaps con- 
ceive of a small college making progress and ac- 
quiring growth without a daily, weekly, bi-week- 
ly or even monthly publication to represent it to 
its friends and keep its doings before its students 
and its alumni. To a struggling educational in- 
stitution publicity is an essential and for it a stu- 
dent magazine or journal will provide better ad- 
vertisement than a full page in a metropolitan or 
urban newspaper. Nowhere can there be record- 
ed to better advantage the athletic, literary, social, 
musical or other events which take place from day 
to day within the confines of a college campus. 
By no other means can the literary talent of the 
institution's students be more successfully devel- 
oped and more advantageously displayed than by 
the college's own periodical. Every progressive 
college recognizes these facts and it is because of 
the recognition of the value of such periodicals 
that there are circulated throughout the country 
such clever, entertaining and informative maga- 
zines as the Princeton Tiger, Pennsylvania State 
College Froth, Harvard Lampoon, Pennsylvania 
Punch Bowl and Pitt Panther. 

Almost continuously since its establishment in 
1866 Lebanon Valley College has had a periodical 
of better or worse make-up to represent it. This 
publication for a long period known as the Forum 
but during the several years preceding 1919 it had 
the somewhat common and abstract name of the 
College News. That this weekly sheet was a well 
-ordered and well-edited journal of the college 
happenings is not disputed, for in the limits of its 
eight twelve-by-nine pages it contained a concise, 
yet comprehensive, review of the events of the 
week at the institution. But its field did not ex- 
tend beyond the simple conveying of news; in 
that it, lived up to its name quite remarkably. The 
literary element was sadly lacking, although it did 
give space occasionally to the publication of a 



particularly creditable manuscript submitted by 
some student, reader, w<ho thus evinced a desire 
both to help the publication by providing it with 
material of real literary value and to extend his or 
her own popularity or reputation through the pub- 
licity brought about by the appearance of the com- 
position in the student sheet. 

This weekly visitor to the dormitory rooms and 
to the homes of numerous alumni and friends of 
Lebanon Valley was strictly a student product. 
That was the misfortune of it. It was admitted- 
ly a good little paper, but not nearly so good as 
it might have been with a dainty dash of super- 
vision and advice from the faculty. The mem- 
bers of that august aggregation, however, evinced 
not the slightest interest in the students' efforts. 
They did each year, it, is true, appoint two advisers 
from their number to serve on the staff of the pub- 
lication, but that didn't mean anything. The 
names of the advisers were tacked onto the mast- 
head, and then the advisers forgot and were for- 
gotten. 

The staff too owed its appointment, but not, by 
any means its existence, to the faculty, but its 
appointment was like that of the two faculty ad- 
visers — a mere matter of form. Once appointed 
the staff was thrown upon its own resources; it 
plodded its weary way alone. Fortunately for 
the institution, the editors-in-chief were as a rule 
capable voung men or women and their own ca- 
pability, coupled with that of the other members 
of the staff, such as the associate editors, social 
editors, athletic editors, music editors and alumni 
editors, carried the little journal through to suc- 
cess year after year. The college itself evinced 
its slight interest in the venture by donating one 
dollar from the matriculation fee of each student 
pach year, but this amount was totally inadequate 
for the publication of the sheet and had to be 
supplemented by a canvass for advertisements and 
for the subscriptions of alumni and friends on the 
part, of the business managers. 

Sad to relate, the apathy towards the worthy 
news purveyor was not restricted to the faculty 
alone. There was not a whole lot of enthusiasm 
shown by the student body. The students received 
their copies each week, read them, comment- 
ed upon them — perhaps — and then laid them 
aside. There their interest, terminated; they sel- 
dom thought of aiding the weekly in any possible 
way. 

It was inconceivable that this deplorable state 
of affairs could continue indefinitely. There 
must come an awakening and it did come at last. 
It remained for an entirely new member of the 
faculty to start the ball rolling — a professor who 
had ideas and ideals and who set about quick- 
ly to put into operation some of those ideas and 
ideals in the life of Lebanon Valley College. The 
faculty had reviewed the News each week and 
found no fault with it, no praise for it. They 
were content to allow it to struggle on in its own 
sweet way without criticising it either constructive- 
ly or destructively. But the newcomer in their 
midst, himself an alumnus of Lebanon Valley and 
a successful instructor in high schools in Red 
Lion, Pa., and Pittsburgh, Pa., and later teacher 
of English in the Carnegie Institute of Techno- 



234 



THE CRUCIBLE 



logy at Pittsburgh, saw at once wherein the heb- 
domadal journal could be bettered. Being a 
man of initiative and purpose, he did not hesi- 
tate to take steps toward its immediate improve- 
ment. 

The new professor did not work alone in his 
efforts to infuse new blood into the paper. One of 
his first acts was to call into consultation the 
editor-in-chief and other members of the staff. 
With them he discussed the condition of the 
journal and he had no trouble in making them 
agree to a change in the policy of the student 
news chronicle. They believed with him that a 
transformation of the News might not only im- 
prove the weekly sheet itself but stir the student 
body, as well as the faculty, from their insalutary 
inertness. The transformation, it was determin- 
ed, should be complete, should include an increase 
and partial change of staff, change of name, 
change in size of publication and change in time 
of publication. 

Perhaps none among the members of the facul- 
ty was better able to determine the fitness of stu- 
dents to be on the staff than the English professor, 
who supervised the composition work of fresh- 
man, sophomore, junior and senior. From the 
freshman class were selected two of the most 
promising writers and added to the editorial staff. 
Two first year men who exhibited not so much 
literary ability but an appreciably greater 
amount of initiative were placed on the business 
staff. In the same manner two sophomores were 
selected, one for the editorial staff and the other 
for the business staff. Hitherto the paper had 
been operated by upperclassmen only; now it was 
to become democratic and members of every class 
were to have a share in its preparation. With the 
addition of these students, a new 1 department — 
the literary — was created ; one of the associate 
editors was transferred to it and one of the new 
writers placed there as her assistant. To the oth- 
er departments of the journal which had a super- 
reminence of work were assigned the other new- 
comers and when the distribution and reorganiza- 
tion was completed there was as well-balanced a 
staff as any magazine or newspare could desire. 

Now the entire staff was taken into the con- 
fidence of the few who had decided upon a trans- 
formation of the student paper and they seconded 
the decision of the few to alter the name. Here 
psychology intervened and it was agreed that the 
staff should not select the new name but that a 
contest should be staged among the students and 
a prize offered for the best suggestion for a name. 
This contest would have a secondary effect in the 
kindling: of interest in the publication. 

But if the staff was to ask for a new name, there 
must be some cause for doing so. Consequently 
a change in the form and size of the publication 
was suggested. The News as then published was 
in the most inexpensive form; to change it would 
mean increased expense. The News Was not a 
money-making proposition ; enough advertise- 
ments and subscriptions had been secured to cover 
its current expenses, but that was all. How then 
could a change be made which would advance the 
expenses of the publication? The business man- 
ager made report of the total of funds on hand 



and he was then sent to ascertain the costs of 
various sizes into which the News might be con- 
verted. His findings were disappointing but the 
staff did the best it could in consideration of its 
finances and when the News next appeared it was 
in the form of a sixteen-page magazine, nine inch- 
es by six inches, and was announced as a bi- 
weekly publication. 

This first issue of the transformed publication 
bore on its front covers a big interrogation point 
and somewihere between its covers it announced 
the decision of the staff and the contest which 
was to provide a new name for the reorganized 
magazine. The students became interested, 
scores of names were submitted and from them 
all emerged "The Crucible." 

The newly-christened magazine was cordially 
received by the students. It aroused comment 
and an appreciable degree of interest, scarcely 
great enough to be called enthusiasm. Their 
interest was quickly put to the test. The funds 
on hand and in prospect were insufficient to meet 
the increased expenses of the new magazine and 
some effort had to be put forth to add to the 
treasury. The business staff set out to secure 
additional advertisements but the advertisements 
forthcoming were few and small, so that some 
other endeavor was necessary. This other en- 
deavor took the form of another contest among the 
students. The contest was made known just be- 
fore Christmas vacation and each student was 
asked to seek out alumni and friends of the insti- 
tution in his or her home town and its environs and 
endeavor to add their names to the list of sub- 
scribers. Prizes were offered. But evidently the 
students were too busy enjoying themselves dur- 
ing the holiday period to think of their task and 
when the reports of the students were called in, 
there were not more than thirty new names to be 
entered on the circulation books. 

With economical dealing and careful manage- 
ment the Crucible weathered the year, but the 
new business managers faced a gloomy prospect 
for the next term. The new size of the publica- 
tion was unsatisfactory; it was not what the staff 
desired, but the best they could do. Now the 
question was, should the magazine return to its 
former size and shape or should it be enlarged 
and made a really representative publication? Of 
course, the latter proposition was favored, but 
during the year printing costs had increased, pa- 
per had advanced in price and it was difficult to 
secure a printer to issue it at any price. 

An indefatigable business staff launched forth 
to make or break the magazine. They made an 
urgent drive for advertisements and landed an ap- 
preciable number. Then they figured up their re- 
sources and proceeded to secure a printer to issue 
the publication. Diligent search was rewarded 
and they found a man whose charge was remark- 
ably reasonable. To him they gave the contract. 
They chanced upon a bargain in cover paper and 
seized it. But when all this had been accomplish- 
ed, they found themselves again short of funds. 
The advertising possibilities had been exhausted, 
the amount which would be received from the 
students' matriculation fees had been figured 
upon, the probable number of outside subscrip- 



« 



THE CRUCIBLE 



235 



tions was added in and still the pot was short. 

To all appearances the only way to fill the pot 
again was by obtaining additional subscriptions. 
But how? The contest of the previous year had 
proved little more than a semi-success and there 
was nothing to indicate that it would result any 
better this time. The business manager himself 
wrote to many alumni and received in return a 
number of checks and money orders which pleased 
him. Then the idea struck him that, perhaps 
he might gather some subscriptions from the 
members of the supporting United Brethren Con- 
ferences, the East Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania, 
which were to hold their annual sessions shortly 
after the opening of the college year. He under- 
took the task of rousing the East Pennsylvania 
members and after a short speech before that 
body succeeded in securing seventeen subscrip- 
tions. The following week one of the athletic 
editors who happened to be quite well acquaint- 
ed with many of the pastors and laymen of the 
Pennsylvania Conference visited the annual sit- 
ting of that organization. He likewise addressed 
the session in behalf of the Crucible and his ap- 
peal, coupled with the offer of a reduced sub- 
scription rate to the conference members ; brought 
in forty-seven more subscriptions. 

Despite the fact that the treasury still lacked 
sufficient money to put the magazine across for 
the term, when the first issue of the Crucible for 
the 1920-1921 term appeared it was a surprise to 
the students. It was no longer the eight-page 
news sheet, nor yet the little nine-by-six maga- 
zine, but a sixteen-page, twelve-by-nine publica- 
tion clothed in a beautiful and substantial cover. 
Its type was larger, it was much more systema- 
tically arranged and was indeed a delightful im- 
provement, over either of the former publications. 
The staff had again been increased, a department 
of jokes and exchanges had been added and the 
magazine was without a doubt more nearly rep- 
resentative of the institution than any previous 
publication put out. by either school or student 
body. 

Perhaps the Crucible is not yet all that it should 
and could be, but it is still in its infancy and its 
prospects are bright. It has now a hardwork- 
ing staff, which each year draws from the incom- 
ing class the best literary and business talent. 
It has no faculty advisers on its staff, but the 
English department of the institution is giving it 
both assistance and supervision. The members of 
the staff still hold their office by appointment 
of the faculty but only the recommendation of the 
English department will secure such appointment. 
This same department has it in its province to 
pick from the staff and recommend each year 
a student for the position of editor-in-chief, but it 
is probable that within another year the seeker of 
that position will have to secure it by surpassing 
his colleagues in a literary competition. How- 
ever, this exalted post is never open to anyone 
who is not specializing in English. That is a 
regulation of the English department promulgat- 
ed after experience had taught that one special- 
izing in science, mathematics or any course other 
than English is not sufficiently interested in a 



venture such as the Crucible to give it the proper 
and necessary time and effort. 

The editor-in-chief for the coming term is one 
whose literary, and particularly poetic, ability has 
been recognized by various magazines throughout 
the country who have accepted and published his 
verse. He is a ministerial student but his particu- 
lar hobby is^ English and it is a safe venture that 
the Crucible wiill have in him both a capable 
executive and a fluent writer. Four willing, earn- 
est freshmen were added to the staff during the 
past term and four more will be added early in 
the coming term, so that as the staff loses its 
most experienced members each year by gradua- 
tion, there have been others in training to step in 
and fill the breach — a condition which was not 
true of the old College News edited and managed 
by seniors and juniors only. 

The size and make-up of the staff, the time of 
publication and the size of the magazine have 
all been changed, but after all the greatest change 
has been in the policy of the journal. It has be- 
come a publication of the students, by the students 
and for the students, and it shall not perish, nor 
even retrograde, however trying may be the strug- 
gles through which it may yet have to pass. It 
is established once and for all. 

HAROLD T. LUTZ. 

ATHLETICS 

Of eight games participated in by the Blue 
and White nine between May 7 and June 1, five 
were checked up as victories and three as defeats 
with the result that Lebanon Valley's percentage 
for the season now stands at 538, with seven games 
won and six lost. During the interim since the 
last, issue of THE CRUCIBLE Pop Kelchner's 
diamond stars have beaten Villanova twice, Buck- 
nell once, Drexel once and Dickinson once, while 
they have in turn been conquered once each by 
Ursinus. Washington College and Georgetown 
University. 

Perhaps it was the glowing success of the May 
Day exercises which spurred Captain Moore and 
his men to bring the holiday to a glorious finish by 
trimming Bucknell, thereby getting revenge for 
the 1 to defeat which Bucknell tacked onto 
Lebanon Valley at Lewisburg on April 22. The 
fray was called immediately after the May Day 
exercises and it early resolved itself into a hurling 
duel between Bellack of Bucknell and Wolf, the 
Blue and White southpaw, with the latter having 
at all times the better of the argument. For 
eierht innings the game was nip and tuck, then 
Uhler got next to Bellack for a single to deep short, 
was sacrificed to second by Wolf and tallied when 
Cohen poled out a long one for three bases. 
Cohen likewise crossed the rubber when the 
squeeze was worked with Roman at the bat. Kos- 
tos, the visitors' third sacker, was the onlv op- 
ponent who could connect safely with Wolf's 
slants, while Bellack was nicked for five hits. 

The following Wednesdav, May 11, the team 
easily trounced Drexel Institute at, Philadelphia 
10 to 2, with Witmer doing mounding duty and 
Captain Moore directing the team in the absence 
of Coach Kelchner. Witmer fanned sixteen and 
allowed only two hits. The Blue and White 



236 



THE CRUCIBLE 



players came through errorless, while DrexePs er- 
rors totaled no less than nine. Reaction set in 
the next day at Collegeville, however, and Ursinus, 
by nicking Wolf for eight bingles registered a 7 
to 2 victory. Howells the Ursinus twirler, was 
hit harder than Wolf but the home boys' hits 
were not as timely. Smith led the Blue and White 
stickers with three hits, two of which were 
doubles ; Wolf had a three-bagger, which was the 
longest hit of the game and Moore also hit one 
for two bases. 

Kelchner's tossers put on the reverse on May 
13 at Villanova and triumphed over the Catholic 
collegians 6 to 5. Witmer's effectiveness in the 
pinches, coupled with four errors on the part of 
Villanova, spelt defeat for Villanova. The field- 
ing behind Witmer was airtight, not a miscue be- 
ing recorded. 

The team arrived home Friday night and on 
Saturday, May 14, put the Dickinson nine to rout 
by a 5 to 2 score. Heller's hurling for the visitors 
was anything but effective and he was relieved 
in the seventh by Hennen, Dickinson's pitching 
ace, who held the Blue and White hitless in the 
seventh and eighth frames. Wolf allowed but 
five hits, no two of which came in the same inning. 
Cantain Moore's slashing triple accounted for two 
of Lebanon Valley's runs in the initial period. 

The most disastrous trip of the season was that 
of the following week, when the team journeyed 
to Washington College, Chestertown. Md., and 
Georgetown Universitv. Washington, D. C. Gal- 
Jandet cancelled and left but the two games. At 
Washing-ton College on the 19th, Witmer was off 
color and lost 7 to 4. Yake relieved Witmer but 
the came was already lost. Witmer's malady of 
weakness was contagious and Wolf suffered a 
similar fate the next day at Georgetown, when 
the Capitol City collegians struck him for thirteen 
safeties and counted eight runs, while Moore's men 
were unable to solve Bissouette's delivery and 
fame awav scoreless. The fielding on both sides 
was erratic, the Blue and White making six mis- 
cups wMle Georgetown misplayed five times. 

For the second time of the season the Blue and 
White nosed out Villanova by a one-run margin 
when, on Saturday, Mav 28, at Lebanon, Wolf 
turned back the heavy-hitting Catholics with a, 
S to 4 score. Walter Wolf got away to a bad 
ptart when he walked three men in the very first 
innincr. With the bases filled Connolly rapped 
nut a lone: sintrle to right and. partly because of 
Vp ke's poor return of the ball, three runs were 
tallied. After that Wolf settled down and was 
an enigma to the opposing batsmen, fourteen of 
"^om were benched by the strike-out route. 
"Pvpnnan. t^e visitors left fielder, led the visitors' 
sticking with a brace of triples, while Moore had 
twn nice singles, both of which drove in runs. 

Three more games are scheduled for Pop Kel- 
rhner's team. On June 1 they play Dickinson at 
Ooviisip- June 4. Susnuehannan at Lebanon, and 
June 14. alumni at Annville. 

On May 20 the tennis team played its only 
tournament of the season, when it lost to Moravian 
College at Bethlehem 4 to 2. Drexel was sched- 
uled for the 19th but found itself unable to play 
when the team arrived there and cancelled the 



tournament. The tournament scheduled with 
Juniata for May Day was postponed because of 
wet courts. 

Manager Herr took with him for the Moravian 
matches R. Stabley, E. Stabley and Glick. In the 
singles Hoffman, Moravian, defeated R. Stabley, 
6 — 1, 6 — 2 ; Kemper, Moravian, lost to Glick, 7 — 5, 
6-4 ; Houser, Moravian, won from E. Stabley, 6 — 4, 
6 — 4 ; Meinert, Moravian, won from Herr, 6 — 3, 
6 — 1. In the doubles Hoffman and Kemper, 
Moravian, won from R. Stabley and Glick, 6 — 1, 
3 — 6, 6 — 4; Houser and Meinert, Moravian, lost 
to E. Stabley and Herr, 6 — 0, 6 — 3. 

Although without a track coach and without 
having made any special efforts towards the ac- 
auiring and training of a track team, Lebanon 
Valley gamely entered a team for the First Annual 
Central Pennsylvania Collegiate Track Conference 
held at Harrisburg on Memorial Day. Because 
it was unprepared for such an event, Lebanon 
Valley did not expect to figure prominently in the 
scoring and in this particular its expectations were 
fulfilled, for it emerged from the meet with one 
lone noint, that scored by Calvin Fencil '23, who 
was tied for third place in the high jump. 

A team of eight men was sent to the meet, the 
members including R. Smith' 23. W. Wolfe '24, 
W. Beattie '23. J. Arnold '22, R. Renn '21, N. 
Risser '23. C. Fencil '23 and J. Glick '24. Of 
these Smith and Wolfe were entered for the 100 
and 220 yard dashes but both failed to qualify 
for either event when the trial heats were staged 
in the morning. In the one — and two-mile runs 
Beattie and Arnold were entered but both made 
a poor showing against the athletes from compet- 
ing institutions. 

Both Risser and Fencil were entered for the 
running high jump but Risser was eliminated in 
the preliminaries during" the morning. Fencil 
cmfllified and in the finals in the afternoon tied 
with two other jumpers for third place, thereby 
winning Lebanon Valley's lone point, in the meet. 
Wolfe oualified for the pole vault but lost out in 
t>>e finals. Glick, who was entered for this event, 
fai^d to qualifv. 

Two Blue and White athletes were entered for 
the s^ot, nut and discus throw. Renn was elimi- 
nated and Glick qualified for the shot put and 
in R t tbf onnosite was true in the discus throw. 
Renn. Wolfe and Risser tried for the running 
bro^d iump but only Renn qualified. 

After the meet, it was decided bv the executive 
committee, of which Prof. Paul S. Wagner, gra- 
duate manager of Lebanon Vallev athletics, is 
a member, that next year's meet should be held 
at Harrisburg on the last Saturday preceding Me- 
morial Day. 

Rumors t>iat, Henry ("Hinkie") Haines, star 
athlpte of Pennsvlvania State College, was to 
coach athletics at Lebanon Valley next year were 
officially confirmed on the night of Mav 24 bv the 
athletic council and a thrill of joy and confidence 
massed through the veins of all loyal Lebanon Val- 
lev students and alumni. 

"Hinkie" is coming back to the place where he 
learned football to teach others how to play it 
^s successfully as he did. Haines, wlho is a Red 
Lion boy, never played football until he came to 



THE CRUCIBLE 



237 



Lebanon Valley in 1916 and it was Coach Guyer 
who then set him on his way to gridiron success. 
"Hinkie" made the scrub team that year and was 
good enough to get in a few minutes of play in the 
game with Lehigh which ended in a 3 to 3 tie. 
In 1918 he left Lebanon Valley and entered Penn 
State where he at once proceeded to make a 
name for himself in all athletics. He became a 
football player of the highest caliber, a speedy 
and clever basketball man and a hard-hitting, 
dependable baseball player. His playing on the 
diamond has been of such a high grade that he 
has been signed by the New York Club of the 
American League. 

It is no wonder that the securing of the services 
of an athlete of such remarkable ability should 
inspire confidence in Lebanon Valley followers. 
The new coach will come here to begin Work on 
September 12, 1921. 

Negotations looking toward the signing of 
Haines as coach had been in progress for some 
time before terms were agreed upon. On May 24 
a conversation between President Gossard and 
Haines resulted satisfactorily and, with Haines 
having indicated his willingness to accept, the 
athletic council on that evening unanimously rati- 
fied his election. Coach Haines paid a visit to 
Lebanon Valley on Sunday, May 29. 

TO MOTHERHOOD 

Ah, thee! 

How far the light of dawning life 

Doth scatter love thru eyes 

That see and understand, 

That yet apace 

Hath visions of the land 

Where spirits roam, 

None built of earthly mire can say! 

And yet 

When blood of blood and part of life 

Revile and honor not 

The aching years when strength 

Was born of Love, 

Thou chideth not though tears 

Like glistening dew 

Do drop from eyes ne'er closed in sleep. 
To thee, 

Repentant, seeking grace, a world 

Of fool forgetfulness 

Doth bend an aching knee; 

In joy doth pour 

A healing oil to mend 

The wounds of years! 

The potion fails! Yet thou dost love! 

R. RHODES STABLEY. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

At the recent, meeting of the general Conference 
of the United Brethren Church held at Indian- 
apolis, the Rev. Dr. Arthur Clippinger of Dayton 
Ohio, a member of the class of 1905, was elected 
bishop to succeed the late Bishop Matthews. 

Bishop Clippinger is a native of Franklin coun- 
ty Penna., and after a course of training m the 
Cumberland Valley State Normal School at Ship- 
pensburg, followed by several years of teaching, 
he entered Lebanon Valley College, graduating m 



1905 in the same class with Professor T. B. Beatty 
of the department of English. 

After graduation he preached at New Cumber- 
land and later entered Yale Divinity School from 
which institution he was graduated with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Divinity. After preaching in 
Dayton, Ohio, he was elected Superintendent of 
the Miami Conference which position he held un- 
til chosen a bishop. 

Bishop Clippinger is in the early forties, and 
is one of the youngest men ever elected. He is 
a forceful speaker and possesses marked qualities 
of leadership. 

Some years ago after graduation from college 
he married a classmate, Miss Ellen W. Mills, 
daughter of the late Bishop Mills. A brother, Dr. 
W. G. Clippinger, class of 1899, is President of 
Otterbein College. 

.The Crucible congratulates Bishop Clippinger 
and calls the attention of its readers to the fact 
that the election was predicted while he was in 
college as witness the following lines taken from 
the 1905 annual : 

There was a young man named Clip. 
And he is wondrous wise; 
To poney would be a sin, says he; 
To trot he never tries. 
To be a bishop is his aim 
A noble start he's made. 
Ray G. Light, Esq., class of 1906, has announced 
his candidacy for the Republican nomination for 
District Attorney for Lebanon County at the Sep- 
tember primaries. Mr. Light completed his legal 
studies in Washington, D. C, and since his admis- 
sion to the bar of Lebanon County has won an 
enviable record as a trusted legal adviser and as 
an able advocate. As a student Mr. Light showed 
himself a clear thinker and a forceful and logical 
debater. If elected, he will fill the position with 
credit. 

Professor H. H. Baish, class of 1901, head of 
the state teachers retirement board of Penna., 
and a member of the board of trustees of the 
General Conference of the United Brethren at 
Indianapolis a plan for preachers retirement fund 
for the church which was adopted. 

Rev. W. H. Washinger, 1891, was re-elected 
Bishop at the recent General Conference. For 
many years he was superintendent of the Penna. 
Conference. 

Rev. P. M. Holdeman, preached the Baccau- 
laureate sermon to the graduates of the Eliza- 
bethville High School, May 29. 

The Pittsburgh-Lebanon Valley College Alumni 
Association organized with 169 members at the 
Hotel Chatham Saturday night, and held its first 
banquet. The association comprises Western 
Pennsylvania and Eastern Ohio, and has its head- 
quarters in Pittsburgh. 

Dr. George Daniel Gossard, President of Leb- 
anon Valley College made the principal address. 
Toasts were responded to by John F. Milliken, 
Esq., Pittsburgh; Horace W. Crider, Esq., Home- 
stead; Rev. W. A. Sites, Braddock; David J. 
Evans, Wilmerding; Rev. Howard L. Oleweiler, 
Wilkinsburg and Harold White, Pittsburg. The 
chairman was David B. Pugh, of Pittsburgh, and 
the singing was in charge of Mwt Gertrude K. 



238 THE CRUCIBLE 



Schmidt, of Monessen, who also sang several solos 
to the delight of all present. 

The following officers were elected for the next 
year: President, L. B. Harnish, of Slippery Rock; 
1st Vice-President, Miss Gertrude K. Schmidt; 
2nd. Vice President, David J. Evans, Wilmerding; 
Secretary, Miss K. Ruth Loser, of Greenville ; and 
treasurer, David B. Pugh, Esq., of Pittsburgh. 

THE GLEE CLUB BANQUET 

On the night of Friday, May the 27th, 1921 was 
held the third annual banquet of our Men's Glee 
Club. The hotel Berkshire was the scene of fes- 
tivities. A more delightful formal affair was 
never held by any of our college organizations. 

The private banquet hall was attractively dec- 
orated with roses and our college colors. Twenty- 
three couples were present including President 
and Mrs. Gossard, and Professor and Mrs. T. B. 
Beatty. 

The menu which when served was a master- 
piece in culinary art included cherry stone clams, 
salted nuts, celery, green olives, mock turtle soup 
au maderia, lobster newburg, boiled one-half 
spring chicken au cresson, French fried potatoes, 
asparagus, Waldorf salad, Neopolitan ice cream, 
strawberries, assorted cakes and coffee. 

After the dining a varied program was enjoyed. 
Professor R. Porter Campbell, faculty director and 
pianist, of the club, filled the role of toastmaster 
with finesse, and eclat. After several mirth pro- 
voking remarks, he presented Dr. Gossard for 
"Greetings from our President." Then under the 
head of "That Reminds Me", R. E. Boyer enter- 
tained the crowd with amusing ancedotes of the 
Hagerstown trip while R. O. Shadle told of the 
Baltimore trip and H. T. Lutz of the Shamokin 
trip. 

After several well received selections by the 
club quartette, Orin. J. Farrell, president, of the 
club gave a very illuminating little talk on "What 
Four Years on the Club Have Done For Me," in 
which he outlined the great benefits in training 
and social accomplishments, which occur from 
glee club activities. "Echoes From the Eurydice 
Choral Club" were given by Miss Ethel Angus, 
President of that sister organization. 

Professor Beatty entertained us with a most 
delightful and well presented reading, "Pro and 
Con." The next number was a one-act skit "After 
the Concert", written by R. R. Stabley. This was 
a parody on the popular syncopated court-room 
sketch which made such a hit everywhere, and 
portrayed the action of glee club after the con- 
cert in front of the theatre when in quest of fair 
ladies. The same eight men of the original skit 
took part m this one and their laughable presenta- 
tion was greatly enjoyed. The characters were: 
Glee Club men — Messrs. C. R. Daugherty, Ni- 
trauer, Spessard and Miller; town girls — Messrs, 
Stabley and Boyer; detective — Mr. Willard; 
policeman — Mr. Shadel. 

The final feature of the evening was the grant 
ing of certificates, pins and gifts to Club members - 
The two four year men, Mr. Farrell and Mr. Ni 
trauer, received handsome gold watch charm!. 
Certificates and gold pins of the Glee Club "LV 
were presented to the three year men, Messrs. . 



T. Spessard, C. R. Daugherty, A. D. Miller, J. W. 
Snider. J. D. Daugherty, R. O. Shadel and S. M. 
Herr. The two year men R. E. Boyer, R. R. Stab- 
ley, L. R r Willard, H. T. Lutz, G. O. Hohl and C. 
B. Sherk were rewarded with silver pins, while 
bronze pins went to the yearlings, C. C. Leber, S. 
D. Evans, J. J. Frank and R. C. Herb. 

Mr. Farrell then presented Professor Beatty 
with twenty dollars in gold as a token of apprecia- 
tion for the splendid services he rendered the club 
in so efficiently coaching the two sketches. Pro- 
fessor Campbell also presented a gold pen knife 
to C. R. Daugherty, business manager, in behalf of 
the club in recognition of the services he per- 
formed. 

The banquet was a fitting climax to the most 
successful year, financially and in enthusiastic re- 
ceptions of programs in the history of the club. 
The well balanced program, at once popular and 
classical, was presented nineteen times and every- 
where acclaimed as the best Glee Club program 
heard in years. Credit for such success must go 
to director Campbell, Prof. Beatty, and the loyal- 
ty of cooperating members of the Club. 

THE JUNIOR RECITAL 

On Tuesday evening, May 17, 1921 the Junior 
Recital was held in the Engle Conservatory of 
Music at 8 o'clock. There was a good atten- 
dance, and everyone present surely enjoyed the 
program. All those who participated in the pro- 
gram acquitted themselves in a creditable manner, 
showing by their work that there is some real 
talent at Lebanon Valley College. 

Miss Florence Stark, in her piano selections, 
proved to us that she is well on the way to be- 
come a master of the piano. Miss Minerva Raab 
showed her invincible skill as a pianist and also 
as an organist. Miss Pearl Seitz's voice was never 
more beautiful than that night. Its clear reson- 
ance, sympathetic quality, ample power, and per- 
fect ease and freedom was predominant in every 
selection. Miss Olive Darling delighted the audi- 
ence with her splendid skill. Miss Josephine 
Hershey's selection showed her regular oratorical 
ability in her humorous reading. 

SENIOR RECITAL 

Miss Catharine Rosemary Engelhardt, pianist, 
and Miss Katharine M. Hummelbaugh, reader, 
gave a joint, recital in the Engle Conservatory of 
Music on Tuesday evening, May 24, 1921 at eight 
o'clock. Miss Engelhardt's selections took us 
away from Lebanon Valley College upon flowery 
beds of ease to far away lands where live only 
beauty, music and joy. She delighted all those 
present and proved that she really is a talented 
musician. Miss Hummelbaugh's readings were 
absolutely flawless. Her position and voice con- 
trol were fine. She captivated her audience from 
the beginning and held them charmed through- 
out the entire program. Miss Hiummelbaugh 
showed us what a true reader is, one who dis- 
regards self and lives in her impersonation. Her 
reading, "The Servant in the House", was a spen- 
did representation and Miss Hummelbaugh inter- 
preted each character with intense feeling and 
sympathy. The closing selection, "At the Sign of 



THE CRUCIBLE 



239 



the Cleft Heart", was a pleasing and entertain- 
ing selection, very cleverly handled by Miss Hum- 
melbaugh. 

THE SENIOR PARTY 

Joy ! Joy ! Joy ! An invitation in rhyme from 
Dr. and Mrs. G. D. Gossard. At last Thursday- 
night came sauntering in. The halls cleared of 
the stately forms of the seniors of '21. Slowly 
and majestically this band wound their way from 
North Hall around the tennis court to the verdant 
bowers of Dr. Gossard's porch. The usual con- 
vential greetings and the first streak of timidity 
vanished. From the walls penants blazed their 
'21's till every member present was thrilled and 
awed by their old class flag — the "Blue and the 
White of '21." 

After the novelty of seeing our class all assem- 
bled for the first time in their Sunday best wore 
off, pencils were darted at each individual. Brows 
began to contract for now the seniors were to be 
tempted and tried. Would they as a class be 
found dangling in the balance? Four groups were 
formed and a menu of the evening's fun was 
handed to each chap. It read something like 
this : — 

Outside leaflet — "Five Senses Worth of Fun, 
Lebanon Valley '21/' 

1st page — "Take a Whiff — Your nose knows. 
Numbers respectively 1 to 21. 

2nd page — "Taste and See". Numbers 1 — 10 
in correct order. 

3rd page — "Seeing is Believing." Numbers 1 
— 50 respectively. 

4th page — "Can You Trust Your Feelings?" — 
blank. 

5th page — "Dio You Know When You Hear?" 

Small vials, each containing a number on out- 
side, a plug of cotton and a substance on inside, 
were juggled around. The chemistry students 
shone for their noses were cultivated. 

"Blind Man's Buff" played with tooth picks and 
morsels of unknown foods came next, taking the 
tasting course. Screams and gurgles of delight 
accompanied this feeding of the animals. 

In the next scene two small tables laden with 
everything from a pin to a camel appeared. In 
the two minutes the curtain was drawn and the 
"feast of the eyes" was over. Pencils j ambled 
across the papers recording what eyes saw. 

"Can You Trust Your Feelings" was the most 
exciting feature. Feelings are strange things, 
you know, and the class of '21 revealed this fact 
vividly. 

Everyone knew when they heard, for none can 
fail at "College Songs" with Miss Witmeyer at the 
piano. 

Food and drinks followed. Such feasting never 
was seen except in the movies. 

Renewing of old acquaintances, fond farewells, 
and yells, and this jolly senior party was all over, 
but the memory of this lovely party given by Dr. 
and Mrs. Gossard will go down in history and live 
forever in the hearts of '21. 

How Strange! 

Miss Adams — He was just as big as the man 
who was no smaller than he. 




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